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  • Author or Editor: Patrick Wefstaedt x
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Abstract

Objective—To investigate the effects of benazepril and heparin on renal function and blood pressure in dogs with chronic kidney disease.

Design—Randomized controlled clinical trial.

Animals—26 dogs with chronic kidney disease.

Procedures—Dogs were randomly assigned to receive benazepril hydrochloride (0.5 mg/kg [0.23 mg/lb], PO, q 24 h; n = 10), benazepril and heparin (150 U/kg [68 U/lb], SC, q 8 h, for the first 6 days; 10), or a placebo (6) and were followed up for 180 days.

Results—Health status score at the end of the study (ie, day 180) was significantly higher for dogs in the 2 treatment groups than for dogs in the placebo group. In addition, glomerular filtration rate was significantly increased and the urine protein-to-creatinine ratio was significantly decreased, compared with baseline rates, at the end of the study for dogs in both treatment groups but not for dogs in the placebo group. Systolic and diastolic blood pressures were significantly decreased on day 6 for dogs in both treatment groups.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggested that administration of benazepril had beneficial effects in dogs with chronic kidney disease but that short-term administration of heparin in conjunction with benazepril did not appear to provide any additional benefit.

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the accuracy and reproducibility of left ventricular (LV) volumetric and function variables determined via contrast-enhanced cardiac CT and cardiac MRI in healthy dogs.

Animals—10 healthy Beagles.

Procedures—Cardiac MRI and cardiac CT were performed in anesthetized Beagles; both examinations were conducted within a 2-hour period. Cardiac MRI was performed with a 3.0-T magnet, and contrast-enhanced cardiac CT was performed with a 64-row detector CT machine. Data sets were acquired during apnea with simultaneous ECG gating. Short-axis images were created to determine functional variables via the Simpson method.

Results—Cardiac CT values for mean end-diastolic and end-systolic LV volumes had excellent correlation (r = 0.95) with cardiac MRI measurements, whereas LV stroke volume (r = 0.67) and LV ejection fraction (r = 0.75) had good correlations. The only variable that differed significantly between imaging modalities was end-diastolic LV volume. For each pair of values, Bland-Altman analysis revealed good limits of agreement.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—The 3-D modalities cardiac CT and cardiac MRI were excellent techniques for use in assessing LV functional variables. Similar results were obtained for LV volume and function variables via both techniques. The major disadvantage of these modalities was the need to anesthetize the dogs for the examinations.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the use of retrospectively ECG-gated, contrast-enhanced, multi-detector row computed tomography (MDCT) for assessment of left ventricular function in dogs and to compare the results with those obtained by use of 2-D and M-mode echocardiographc techniques.

Animals—10 healthy Beagles.

Procedures—Dogs underwent MDCT (performed by use of a 64-detector row CT system) and echocardiography under general anesthesia. Left ventricular end-systolic volume (ESV), end-diastolic volume (EDV), and ejection fraction (EF) were determined in MDCT-generated multiplanar reformatted images by use of Simpson and biplane area-length calculation methods. Results were compared with left ventricular ESV, EDV, and EF determined in echocardiographc images by use of Teichholz and bullet method calculations. Results were evaluated via Deming regression analysis and Pearson correlation tests. Bland-Altman analysis was used to assess limits of agreement and systematic errors between the 2 methods.

Results—Mean values for EDV and ESV determined by use of MDCT were highly correlated with those determined by use of echocardiography, regardless of the calculation methods compared (r = 0.91 to 0.96); volumes determined by use of MDCT appeared to be higher than those determined by use of echocardiography, although most differences were nonsignificant. Mean EF determined by use of MDCT with the Simpson calculation method was highly correlated with that determined by use of echocardiography with bullet method calculations (r = 0.90).

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggested that assessment of left ventricular volume and function in dogs is feasible with MDCT. To estimate left ventricular EF with MDCT. use of the Simpson calculation method is advised.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To quantify left ventricle (LV) volumes by use of 1-D, 2-D, and 3-D echocardiography versus MRI in dogs.

Animals—10 healthy Beagles.

Procedures—During anesthesia, each dog underwent an echocardiographic examination via the Teichholz method, performed on the basis of standard M-mode frames (1-D); the monoplane Simpson method of disk (via 2-D loops); real-time triplane echocardiography (RTTPE) with a 3-D probe; and real-time 3-D echocardiography with a 3-D probe. Afterward, cardiac MRI was performed. Values for the LV end-diastolic volume (EDV), end-systolic volume (ESV), and ejection fraction (EF) were compared between each echocardiographic method and the reference method (cardiac MRI).

Results—No significant differences for EDV, ESV, and EF were detected between RTTPE and cardiac MRI. Excellent correlations (r = 0.97, 0.98, and 0.95 for EDV, ESV, and EF, respectively) were found between RTTPE and values for cardiac MRI. The other echocardiographic methods yielded values significantly different from cardiac MRI and results correlated less well with results of cardiac MRI for EDV, ESV, and EF. Use of the Teichholz method resulted in LV volume overestimation, whereas the Simpson method of disk and real-time 3-D echocardiography significantly underestimated LV volumes.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Use of RTTPE yielded excellent correlations and nonsignificant differences with cardiac MRI and is a suitable method for routine veterinary cardiac examination.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the load redistribution mechanisms in walking and trotting dogs with induced forelimb lameness.

Animals—7 healthy adult Beagles.

Procedures—Dogs walked and trotted on an instrumented treadmill to determine control values for peak and mean vertical force as well as verticle impulse for all 4 limbs. A small sphere was attached to the ventral pad of the right forelimb paw to induce a reversible lameness, and recordings were repeated for both gaits. Additionally, footfall patterns were assessed to test for changes in temporal gait variables.

Results—During walking and trotting, peak and mean vertical force as well as vertical impulse were decreased in the ipsilateral forelimb, increased in the contralateral hind limb, and remained unchanged in the ipsilateral hind limb after lameness was induced. All 3 variables were increased in the contralateral forelimb during trotting, whereas only mean vertical force and vertical impulse were increased during walking. Stance phase duration increased in the contralateral forelimb and hind limb during walking but not during trotting.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Analysis of the results suggested that compensatory load redistribution mechanisms in dogs depend on the gait. All 4 limbs should be evaluated in basic research and clinical studies to determine the effects of lameness on the entire body. Further studies are necessary to elucidate specific mechanisms for unloading of the affected limb and to determine the long-term effects of load changes in animals with chronic lameness.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research