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  • Author or Editor: Patrick C. Carney x
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Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To retrospectively investigate the safety of canine therapeutic IA injections, describing and correlating adverse events with the number of injections per visit, joint injected, signalment, body condition score, type, and volume of injectate.

SAMPLE

There were 505 joint injections across 283 visits for 178 client-owned dogs, including the shoulder, elbow, carpus, hip, stifle, tarsus, and metacarpophalangeal.

PROCEDURES

A search was performed of the Cornell University Hospital for Animals medical records for relevant data, identifying dogs treated with therapeutic joint injections and rechecked between 2010 and 2022.

RESULTS

Minor complications were noted in 70 of 283 visits and included transient soreness (18.4%, lasting a median of 2 days; range, 1 to 20 days) and gastroenteritis (6.8%). One case of septic arthritis (1/505 joints), which possessed risks of a hematogenous source, was the only potential major complication. Soreness was not correlated with the number of joints injected per visit. Larger volumes of injectate normalized to body size were more likely to be associated with transient soreness in the stifle and tarsus. Across injectates, only stem cells had significantly increased odds of soreness. Gastroenteritis was not associated with the type of injectate.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Therapeutic joint injections in dogs are safe, with an extremely low risk of major adverse effects. Transient soreness is a commonly expected minor adverse event. The use of stem cells or larger injectate volumes (confined to the stifle and smaller distal joints) may be more likely to invoke discomfort.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To report the complication rate of dogs undergoing oral oncological surgery when using a bone-cutting piezoelectric unit for osteotomies.

CLINICAL PRESENTATION AND PROCEDURES

Retrospective cohort evaluation of medical records from 2012 through 2022 for canine patients that underwent mandibulectomy or maxillectomy for the treatment of oral neoplasia at the Companion Animal Hospital at Cornell University. Cases were included if osteotomy was performed using a piezoelectric unit. Medical records were then reviewed for documentation of intraoperative hemorrhage and administration of blood products.

RESULTS

41 maxillectomies and 57 mandibulectomies met the inclusion criteria (98 in total). Only 1 (1.02%) case was associated with excessive surgical bleeding requiring administration of blood products.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Results of this study show that intraoperative hemorrhage requiring the use of blood products during or immediately after a mandibulectomy or maxillectomy is rare when using a piezoelectric unit to perform osteotomies, and is substantially lower than that previously reported when using oscillating saws or other bone-cutting devices for maxillectomies.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To measure interobserver agreement for 4 functional tasks and their summed geriatric functional score (GFS) and correlate tasks and GFS with client-specific outcome measurements (CSOMs): Canine Brief Pain Inventory (CBPI) pain severity, CBPI pain interference, and Liverpool Osteoarthritis in Dogs.

ANIMALS

89 geriatric dogs were recruited between April and September 2023 from staff, friends, and clients of the Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine with a median age of 11.0 years and weight of 26.4 kg.

METHODS

Dogs underwent 4 sequential functional tests: timed up and go (TUG), cavallettis, figure 8s, and down to stands. Two observers independently scored each dog. The GFS was calculated based on the summed scores of the individual tests. Additional information collected included signalment, weight, measurements reflecting the comorbidities of aging (body condition score and muscle condition score), and CSOMs.

RESULTS

Strong interrater agreement was found for all functional tests. The TUG in seconds (sTUG) and figure 8s demonstrated significant (P < .05) moderate to strong correlations to all CSOMs. The GFS showed similar significant correlations with all CSOMs except CBPI pain severity; however, when correlating individual tests to CSOMs, only figure 8s and TUG were significantly contributing to GFS results. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis defined highly functional dogs as those completing the sTUG in under 3.83 seconds. The sTUG represented the best test for geriatric function given it was objective, reliable, correlated well to CSOMs, and could help identify highly functioning dogs.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

The sTUG appears to be the first practical and reliable functional test of canine geriatric mobility.

Open access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research