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  • Author or Editor: Patricia C. Blanchard x
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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Summary

Ninety-five aborted bovine fetuses received from California dairies over a 4.5-year period had histologic lesions of focal encephalitis. Protozoa that reacted with Neospora caninum antiserum were detected in the brain of 88 of these fetuses and in the heart of 1 fetus. Sarcocystis spp schizonts were seen in the vascular endothelium of 1 fetus. It was concluded that a Neospora-like cyst-forming coccidian may be a major cause of abortion in California dairy cattle.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Objective

To identify risk factors associated with Salmonella menhaden associated disease in adult dairy cows during an outbreak in California.

Design

Case-control study.

Sample Population

8 case dairies that had ≥ 1 adult animal that had clinical signs of salmonellosis and from which S menhaden was isolated and 22 control dairies, 16 of which were matched on the basis of herd size and county and 6 of which were matched on the basis of herd size, county, and breed (Jersey).

Procedure

A questionnaire was developed and reviewed with the herdsman or owner of each dairy. Primary areas of concern were herd management, disease characteristics, and feed-related information.

Results

Use of 1 particular feed mill and feeding animal fat were significant risk factors for clinical disease attributable to S menhaden infection.

Clinical Implications

Feed should not be overlooked as a potential source of Salmonella organisms in dairy herds. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 1997;210:528–530)

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Objective—

To estimate the minimum rate of abortion attributable to infection with Neospora sp in selected California dairy herds.

Design—

Prospective study.

Animals—

Twenty-six dairy herds containing 19,708 cows were studied. Fourteen herds had a history of abortions attributable to neosporosis, and 12 were herds in which neosporosis had not been identified as a cause of abortions.

Procedure—

During a 1-year period, all available aborted fetuses were submitted to veterinary diagnostic laboratories to determine the cause of abortion. Reproductive records of cows that aborted were reviewed.

Results—

Neospora sp infection was the major cause of abortion identified (113/266 abortions, 42.5%). The majority (232/266, 87.2%) of the aborted fetuses were submitted from herds with a history of abortions attributable to neosporosis, and Neospora sp infection was identified as the causative agent in 101 of 232 (43.5%) of the abortions from these herds. Fewer aborted fetuses were submitted from the 12 herds that did not have a history of abortion attributable to Neospora sp; however, neosporosis was confirmed as a cause of abortion in 6 of these 12 herds and was identified as the causative agent in 12 of 34 (35.3%) abortions from these herds. The disease was widespread throughout the state (19/26 herds in our study). Available reproductive histories of cows that had abortions attributed to neosporosis were evaluated, and 4 cows were identified that twice aborted Neospora-in-fected fetuses.

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association