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  • Author or Editor: Patrice M. Mich x
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Abstract

OBJECTIVE To evaluate effects of an orthosis on biomechanics of a cranial cruciate ligament (CrCL)-deficient canine stifle joint by use of a 3-D quasistatic rigid-body pelvic limb computer model simulating the stance phase of gait and to investigate influences of orthosis hinge stiffness (durometer).

SAMPLE A previously developed computer simulation model for a healthy 33-kg 5-year-old neutered Golden Retriever.

PROCEDURES A custom stifle joint orthosis was implemented in the CrCL-deficient pelvic limb computer simulation model. Ligament loads, relative tibial translation, and relative tibial rotation in the orthosis-stabilized stifle joint (baseline scenario; high-durometer hinge]) were determined and compared with values for CrCL-intact and CrCL-deficient stifle joints. Sensitivity analysis was conducted to evaluate the influence of orthosis hinge stiffness on model outcome measures.

RESULTS The orthosis decreased loads placed on the caudal cruciate and lateral collateral ligaments and increased load placed on the medial collateral ligament, compared with loads for the CrCL-intact stifle joint. Ligament loads were decreased in the orthosis-managed CrCL-deficient stifle joint, compared with loads for the CrCL-deficient stifle joint. Relative tibial translation and rotation decreased but were not eliminated after orthosis management. Increased orthosis hinge stiffness reduced tibial translation and rotation, whereas decreased hinge stiffness increased internal tibial rotation, compared with values for the baseline scenario.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Stifle joint biomechanics were improved following orthosis implementation, compared with biomechanics of the CrCL-deficient stifle joint. Orthosis hinge stiffness influenced stifle joint biomechanics. An orthosis may be a viable option to stabilize a CrCL-deficient canine stifle joint.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To compare the efficacy and adverse effects of sustained-release (SR) buprenorphine following SC administration and buprenorphine following oral transmucosal (OTM) administration in cats undergoing ovariohysterectomy.

Animals—21 young healthy female cats.

Procedures—As part of anesthetic premedication (0 hours), 10 cats received buprenorphine (0.02 mg/kg) via OTM administration with additional doses at 12, 24, 36, 48, and 60 hours and 11 cats received an equivalent total dose as a single SC injection of SR buprenorphine (0.12 mg/kg). The SR product contained buprenorphine hydrochloride in a proprietary SR matrix. All other anesthetic drugs and a single postoperative dose of meloxicam were administered similarly to all cats. Behavioral and physiologic variables were recorded, and signs of pain were assessed by use of 2 pain assessment scales and von Frey filament testing in each cat prior to premedication administration (baseline), during recovery from anesthesia (RFA), and at 12, 24, 36, 48, 60, and 72 hours.

Results—Heart rate increased and temperature (determined via microchip transponder thermometry) decreased from baseline values during RFA in both groups. Compared with baseline values, pain scores were increased during RFA and at the 12- and 24-hour time points in both groups; von Frey scores were higher during RFA. Behavioral and physiologic variables did not differ significantly between groups at any time point.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—In cats undergoing ovariohysterectomy, SC administration of a preoperative dose of SR buprenorphine appeared to have comparable efficacy and adverse effect profile as that of twice-daily OTM administration of buprenorphine before and after surgery.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate perioperative administration of gabapentin as an adjunct for analgesia in dogs undergoing amputation of a forelimb.

Design—Randomized, controlled trial.

Animals—30 client-owned dogs.

Procedures—On the day before surgery, a baseline pain evaluation was performed in each dog by use of multiple pain assessment methods. Dogs then received gabapentin (10 mg/kg [4.5 mg/lb], PO, once, followed by 5 mg/kg [2.3 mg/lb], PO, q 12 h for 3 additional days) or a placebo. On the day of surgery, dogs were anesthetized and forelimb amputation was performed. Fentanyl was infused after surgery for 18 to 24 hours; use of other analgesics was allowed. In-hospital pain evaluations were repeated at intervals for 18 hours after surgery, and owners were asked to evaluate daily their dog's activity, appetite, and wound soreness for the first 3 days after discharge from the hospital. Results were analyzed by use of a repeated-measures ANOVA.

Results—Pain evaluation scores did not differ significantly between gabapentin and placebo groups in the hospital or at home after discharge.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—As an adjunct to other analgesics and anesthetics, gabapentin, at the dose and frequency used in this study, did not provide a significant benefit for the management of acute perioperative pain in dogs undergoing forelimb amputation. The small sample size and number of other confounding factors, such as aggressive use of other analgesics, limited the likelihood of detecting a benefit of gabapentin. Other gabapentin doses or dosing regimens warrant further study.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To compare owner satisfaction between custom-made stifle joint orthoses and tibial plateau leveling osteotomy (TPLO) for the management of medium- and large-breed dogs with cranial cruciate ligament disease (CCLD).

DESIGN Owner survey.

SAMPLE 819 and 203 owners of dogs with CCLD that were managed with a custom-made stifle joint orthosis or TPLO, respectively.

PROCEDURES Client databases of an orthosis provider and veterinary teaching hospital were reviewed to identify potential survey respondents. An online survey was developed to evaluate owner-reported outcomes, complications, and satisfaction associated with the nonsurgical (orthosis group) and surgical (TPLO group) interventions. Survey responses were compared between groups.

RESULTS The response rate was 25% (203/819) and 37% (76/203) for the orthosis and TPLO groups, respectively. The proportion of owners who reported that their dogs had mild or no lameness and rated the intervention as excellent, very good, or good was significantly greater for the TPLO group than for the orthosis group. However, ≥ 85% of respondents in both groups reported that they would choose the selected treatment again. Of 151 respondents from the orthosis group, 70 (46%) reported skin lesions associated with the device, 16 (11%) reported that the dog subsequently underwent surgery, and 10 (7%) reported that the dog never tolerated the device.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results indicated high owner satisfaction rates for both interventions. Owners considering nonsurgical management with an orthosis should be advised about potential complications such as persistent lameness, skin lesions, patient intolerance of the device, and the need for subsequent surgery.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association