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  • Author or Editor: Pamela E. Ginn x
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SUMMARY

Objective

To evaluate clinical and histologic effects of surgically created urethral intussusception and determine whether it creates a high-pressure zone that resists passive urine flow in clinically normal dogs.

Animals

8 healthy adult sexually intact female dogs.

Procedure

Urethral pressure profilometry was used to measure maximal urethral closure pressure (MUCP) and functional profile length (FPL) in dogs sedated with xylazine hydrochloride and atropine before and 2, 4, 7, 14, 28, 60, and 90 days after surgery. Cystourethral leak point pressure (CLPP) and cystourethral leak point volume (CLPV) were determined in anesthetized dogs immediately before and after surgery. Dogs were assigned to 4 groups of 2 dogs each; groups were euthanatized 4, 14, 28, and 90 days later, and representative tissues were examined.

Results

Dog 1 developed complete postoperative urethral obstruction. The procedure was altered, and all dogs recovered without complication. Mild inflammation attributable to surgical manipulation, but not ischemic damage or reduction of the intussusception, was evident. Comparison of preoperative MUCP and FPL with postoperative values did not yield significant differences. Immediate postoperative CLPP and CLPV were significantly higher than preoperative values, but were not significantly increased at euthanasia. A distinct but nonsignificant pressure spike was observed in postoperative urethral pressure profiles and persisted in 7 of 8 dogs.

Conclusions

Urethral intussusception does not have deleterious effects when performed as described. Urodynamic data do not support the premise that urethral intussusception will create a high-pressure zone in the urethra that will resist passive urine flow long term in clinically normal dogs. (Am J Vet Res 1998;59:904–912)

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

  • A thymoma may not be clinically evident unless it is large enough to cause abnormal respiratory tract signs or a paraneoplastic syndrome develops.

  • Ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration is a safe, minimally invasive method for diagnosis of masses in the cranial portion of the mediastinum. Needle or excisional biopsy may be required to definitively distinguish or confirm a diagnosis of thymoma or lymphoma.

  • A minimally invasive thymoma may be surgically excised via median sternotomy in rabbits.

  • Neurofibrosarcoma is a locally invasive tumor with a tendency to recur unless excision has been wide and complete, and adjunctive radiotherapy or chemotherapy is administered.

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective

To determine whether healthy dogs given high doses of methylprednisolone sodium succinate (MPSS) develop gastrointestinal tract ulcers and hemorrhage.

Animals

19 healthy male hound-type dogs.

Procedure

Dogs were assigned randomly to intravenously receive high doses of MPSS (30 mg/kg of body weight, initially, then 15 mg/kg 2 and 6 hours later, and, subsequently, every 6 hours for a total of 48 hours; n = 10) or an equal volume of saline (0.9% NaCl) solution (9). Gastroduodenoscopy was performed before and after treatment. Endoscopic evidence of gross hemorrhage in the cardia, fundus, antrum, and duodenum of each dog was graded from none (0) to severe (3), and a total stomach score was calculated as the sum of the regional gastric scores. Number of ulcers were recorded. The pH of gastric fluid and evidence of occult gastric and fecal blood were measured. Food retention was recorded.

Results

Gastric hemorrhage was evident in all dogs after MPSS administration and was severe in 9 of 10 dogs but not visible in any dog after saline treatment. Occult gastric blood was detected more commonly (9/10 vs 2/9), median gastric acidity was greater (pH 1 vs pH 3), and food was retained more commonly (7/10 vs 1/9) in the stomach of MPSS-treated dogs.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance

High doses of MPSS cause gastric hemorrhage in dogs. All dogs treated with high doses of MPSS should be treated with mucosal protectants or antacids to prevent gastric hemorrhage. (Am J Vet Res 1999;60:977–981)

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective

To determine whether administration of misoprostol prevents gastric hemorrhage in healthy dogs treated with high doses of methylprednisolone sodium succinate (MPSS).

Animals

18 healthy hound-type dogs of both sexes.

Procedure

All dogs were given high doses of MPSS (30 mg/kg of body weight, initially, then 15 mg/kg 2 and 6 hours later, and, subsequently, q 6 h for a total of 48 hours) IV. Dogs were assigned randomly to receive concurrent treatment with misoprostol (4 to 6 μg/kg, PO, q 8 h; n = 9) or an empty gelatin capsule (9). Gastroduodenoscopy was performed before and after treatment. Hemorrhage was graded from none (0) to severe (3) for each cardia, fundus, antrum, and duodenum. A total stomach score was calculated as the sum of the regional stomach scores. Food retention was recorded, and pH of gastric fluid was determined. Gastric and fecal occult blood was measured.

Results

Gastric hemorrhage was evident in all dogs after MPSS administration, and its severity was similar in both groups. Median total stomach score was 6 for misoprostol-treated dogs and 5.5 for dogs given the gelatin capsule. Difference in gastric acidity, frequency of food retention, and incidence of occult blood in gastric fluid and feces was not apparent between the 2 groups.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance

Administration of misoprostol (4 to 6 μg/kg, PO, q 8 h) does not prevent gastric hemorrhage caused by high doses of MPSS. Alternative prophylactic treatment should be considered. (Am J Vet Res 1999;60:982–985)

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research