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Abstract

Objective—To develop a scoring system for histopathologic changes in the synovium of tarsocrural joints (TCJs) of horses with osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) and to test for association between histopathologic changes and joint effusion or lameness.

Animals—93 horses with OCD of the intermediate ridge of the tibia of 1 or both TCJs (134 joints) and 38 control horses without disease of TCJs (38 joints).

Procedures—For OCD-affected horses, pretreatment lameness, TCJ effusion, and results of pelvic limb flexion test were scored. Synovial biopsy specimens were obtained from TCJs of OCD-affected horses during arthroscopy, and similar postmortem tissue specimens were obtained from control horses through a small arthrotomy. Histologic signs of synovitis in 172 biopsy specimens were scored by 2 pathologists (A and B) by use of 2 criteria: synoviocyte proliferation and cellular infiltration.

Results—Analysis of scoring revealed good to very good intraobserver agreement within pathologist A (weighted kappa [WK], 0.76 to 0.81), and moderate to good agreement within pathologist B (WK, 0.56 to 0.63). Interobserver agreement for synoviocyte proliferation (WK, 0.34 to 0.52) and cellular infiltration (WK, 0.38 to 0.48) scores was fair to moderate. Joint effusion and synoviocyte proliferation were significantly associated, as were joint effusion and cellular infiltration. There was no association between histopathologic changes and the other clinical signs evaluated.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—The scoring system was helpful for evaluating synovial inflammation caused by OCD of the intermediate ridge of the tibia in horses. Histopathologic signs of synovial inflammation were associated with effusion but not with lameness.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To quantify concentrations of cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) and fibromodulin in synovial fluid from the tarsocrural joints (TCJs) of horses with osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) of the distal intermediate ridge of the tibia and determine whether concentrations would change following arthroscopic removal of osteochondral fragments.

ANIMALS 115 client-owned horses with OCD of the TCJ and 29 control horses euthanized for unrelated reasons.

PROCEDURES COMP and fibromodulin concentrations were measured in synovial fluid from the TCJs of the affected horses before and after osteochondral fragments were removed arthroscopically and in synovial fluid from the TCJs of the control horses after euthanasia. Synovial biopsy specimens from the TCJs of affected and control horses were examined histologically for evidence of inflammation.

RESULTS Synovial fluid COMP and fibromodulin concentrations prior to surgery in horses with OCD were not significantly different from concentrations in control horses. Fibromodulin, but not COMP, concentration in horses with OCD was significantly decreased after surgery, compared with the concentration before surgery. Fibromodulin concentration was significantly correlated with joint effusion score but not with lameness score or results of a flexion test and was correlated with histologic score for number of synoviocytes on the surface of the synovium but not with score for degree of infiltration of inflammatory cells in the synovium. Synovial fluid COMP concentration was not significantly correlated with clinical or histologic findings.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results suggested that fibromodulin, but not COMP, could potentially be a biomarker of joint inflammation in horses with OCD of the TCJ.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective

To determine intravascular and intrasynovial pharmacokinetics of the R and S enantiomers of ketoprofen after IV and IM administration to horses.

Animals

6 healthy adult mares.

Procedure

Horses were weighed and ketoprofen (2.2 mg/kg of body weight) was administered IV. Blood and synovial fluid samples were obtained and analyzed for concentrations of the R and S enantiomers by means of a modified reverse-phase stereospecific high-pressure liquid chromatographic method. Three weeks later, the procedure was repeated, except that ketoprofen was given IM. Protein binding of ketoprofen enantiomers was determined by means of ultrafiltration. Nonlinear least squares methods were used to calculate pharmacokinetic parameters.

Results

Data obtained after IV administration best fit an open, two-compartment model. Mean ± SD S-to-R serum concentration ratios after IV and IM administration were 1.36 ± 0.214 and 1.34 ± 0.245, respectively. Intrasynovial concentrations of the R and S enantiomers of ketoprofen could be measured for only the first 3 hours after IV administration; concentrations were less than the limit of quantification by 4 hours after IV administration and at all times after IM administration. Extent of protein binding of the R enantiomer was not significantly different from extent of protein binding of the S enantiomer; extent of protein binding did not appear to be concentration dependent. Mean free S-to-free R serum concentration ratios, adjusted for protein binding, after IV and IM administration were 1.58 and 1.56, respectively.

Conclusions

The R and S enantiomers of ketoprofen are rapidly absorbed and eliminated, have low volumes of distribution, and are highly protein bound. (Am J Vet Res 1998;59:739-743)

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research