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  • Author or Editor: P. O. Eric Mueller x
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Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the effect of sodium carboxymethylcellulose (SCMC) or a hyaluronate-carboxymethylcellulose membrane (HA membrane) on healing of the small intestine in horses.

Animals—18 healthy adult horses.

Procedure—Midline celiotomy and 2 jejunal resection- and-anastomosis surgeries were performed. In treated horses, SCMC (n = 6) or a HA membrane (6) was applied to the jejunum to cover the anastomosis. There were 6 untreated control horses. Horses were euthanatized 10 days after surgery. For each horse, 1 anastomosis was used for histologic examination, and the second was used to determine intestinal bursting strength. Intestinal bursting tension, serosal granulation tissue, serosal fibrin deposition, and width of the fibrous seal at the anastomosis were compared among groups.

Results—3 control horses had adhesions associated with the anastomosis, but none of the treated horses had adhesions associated with the anastomosis. Mean thickness of fibrin deposited on the serosal surfaces for the SCMC and HA-membrane groups was significantly less than that for control horses. Mean thickness of serosal granulation tissue, width of fibrous seal between inverted musculature, inflammatory cell infiltrate scores, and bursting tension did not differ significantly among groups.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Use of SCMC or application of a HA membrane to small intestinal anastomoses in horses resulted in fewer adhesions and decreased fibrin deposition, and it did not adversely affect anastomotic healing. In horses at increased risk for intra-abdominal adhesions, SCMC or application of HA membranes may decrease the frequency of adhesions without adversely affecting healing of small intestinal anastomoses. (Am J Vet Res 2000;61:369–374)

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To compare a double-layer inverting anastomosis with a single-layer appositional anastomosis, coated with either 1% sodium carboxymethylcellulose (SCMC) or 0.4% sodium hyaluronate (HA) solutions, in the small intestine of horses with respect to anastomotic healing and adhesion formation.

Animals—18 adult horses.

Procedure—Midline celiotomy and end-to-end jejunal anastomoses were performed. In control group horses (n = 6), a double-layer inverting anastomosis coated with sterile lactated Ringer's solution was performed. In treatment group horses, a single-layer appositional anastomosis was performed that was coated with 1% carboxymethylcellulose solution (SAA + SCMC group horses, 6) or 0.4% hyaluronate solution (SAA + HA group horses, 6). An additional 500 mL of the respective treatment solution was applied to the jejunal serosal surface, and 2 jejunal serosal abrasion sites were created. Horses were euthanatized 10 days after surgery. Anastomoses and abdominal adhesions were evaluated grossly. Anastomotic healing was evaluated on the basis of bursting wall tension.

Results—Bursting wall tension was significantly greater in SAA + SCMC group horses, compared with control group horses. All intestinal segments failed at a point distant to the anastomosis. Significantly fewer adhesions were found at the abrasion sites of SAA + HA group horses, compared with control group horses. No differences were found in adhesion formation at the anastomotic sites among groups.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Coating a single- layer appositional jejunal anastomosis with SCMC or HA solutions does not adversely affect anastomotic healing. Application of 0.4% HA solution to the serosal surface of the jejunum significantly decreases the incidence of experimentally induced intra-abdominal adhesion formation in horses. ( Am J Vet Res 2004;65:637–643)

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To determine whether 1% diclofenac liposomal suspension (DLS) ointment would be absorbed transdermally and attenuate experimentally induced subcutaneous inflammation in horses.

Animals—7 healthy adult horses

Procedure—Inflammation was produced by injecting 1% sterile carrageenan into subcutaneously implanted tissue cages 8 hours before (time –8) and at the time of application of test ointment. A crossover design was used. Horses received 1 of 2 treatments (topically administered control or DLS ointments) during 48 hours of carrageenan-induced subcutaneous inflammation. A single application of test ointment (7.2 g) was applied over each tissue cage (time 0). Samples of transudate and blood were collected at –8, 0, 6, 12, 18, 24, 30, 36, and 48 hours. Plasma and transudate diclofenac concentrations were determined by use of high-performance liquid chromatography. Transudate concentrations of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) were determined with a competitive enzyme immunoassay.

Results—DLS was absorbed transdermally. The highest concentration (mean ± SEM, 76.2 ± 29 ng/mL) was detectable in tissue-cage fluid within 18 hours after application. Minimal concentrations of diclofenac were detectable in plasma. Application of DLS significantly decreased transudate concentrations of PGE2 at 6 and 30 hours. Decreases in PGE2 concentration were observed in the DLS group at all collection times.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—A single topical application of DLS resulted in concentrations of diclofenac in transudate within 6 hours and significantly attenuated carrageenan-induced local production of PGE2. Results of this study suggest that DLS is readily absorbed transdermally and may be efficacious for reducing subcutaneous inflammation in horses. ( Am J Vet Res 2004;65:271–276)

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To compare the outcomes of doublelayer inverting anastomosis (DIA), single-layer anastomosis (SLA), and single-layer anastomosis combined with a hyaluronate membrane (SLA+HA-membrane) with respect to stomal diameter, adhesion formation, surgery time, and anastomotic healing in horses.

Animals—18 adult horses.

Procedure—Midline celiotomy and end-to-end anastomoses were performed. In control horses (n = 6), DIA was performed; in treated horses, SLA was performed (6) or SLA+HA-membrane was performed (6). Horses were euthanatized 21 days after surgery. Abdominal adhesions were evaluated grossly and histologically. Stomal diameters were measured ultrasonographically and compared with adjacent luminal diameters. Anastomotic healing was evaluated histologically for fibrosis and inflammation, tissue alignment, and inversion. Surgery times were recorded for the anastomotic procedure and compared among groups.

Results—There were significantly more adhesions in the SLA group, compared with the DIA and SLA+HAmembrane groups. Reduction in stomal diameters in the DIA group was significantly greater than the SLA and SLA+HA-membrane groups. Surgery times for the DIA group were significantly greater than the SLA and SLA+HA-membrane groups. Histologic findings of fibrosis, inflammation, and mucosal healing were similar among groups. There was significant tissue inversion in the DIA group, compared with the 2 treatment groups. Tissue alignment was not different among groups.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Use of a SLA+HA-membrane was an effective small intestinal anastomotic technique. This technique was faster to perform and resulted in a larger stomal diameter, compared with the DIA technique and significantly fewer perianastomotic adhesions, compared with the SLA technique. (Am J Vet Res 2001;62:1314–1319)

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To determine risk factors for development of sequestra in cattle and identify factors associated with a successful outcome.

Design—Retrospective study.

Animals—110 cattle.

Procedure—Medical records of cattle treated at veterinary teaching hospitals in North America were reviewed. To determine risk factors for osseous sequestration, breed, age, and sex of cattle with osseous sequestration were compared with breed, age, and sex of all other cattle admitted during the study period.

Results—110 cattle were included in the study. Three had 2 sequestra; thus, 113 lesions were identified. Most sequestra were associated with the bones of the extremities, most commonly the third metacarpal or third metatarsal bone. Ninety-two animals were treated surgically (ie, sequestrectomy), 7 were treated medically, 3 were initially treated medically and were then treated surgically, and 8 were not treated. Follow-up information was available for 65 animals treated surgically and 6 animals treated medically. Fifty-one (78%) animals treated surgically and 5 animals treated medically had a successful outcome. Cattle that were 6 months to 2 years old had a significantly increased risk of developing a sequestrum, compared with cattle < 6 months old. Cattle in which sequestrectomy was performed with the aid of local anesthesia were significantly more likely to undergo 2 or more surgical procedures than were cattle in which sequestrectomy was performed with the aid of general anesthesia.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggest that sequestrectomy will result in a successful outcome for most cattle with osseous sequestration. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2000;217:376–383)

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association