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Abstract

CASE DESCRIPTION

A 7-year-old sexually intact female rabbit was admitted to the hospital because of a 6-month history of chronic right pelvic limb lameness.

CLINICAL FINDINGS

Clinical examination revealed a prominent right pelvic limb lameness and signs of pain on manipulation of the right hip joint, with a focal, well-defined soft tissue mass palpable in the right pelvic area. Pelvic radiography revealed a lytic hip joint lesion and CT detailed an expansile lesion within the proximal portion of the femur with an appearance consistent with a soft tissue mass. Histologic evaluation of incisional biopsy samples of the soft tissue mass revealed a poorly differentiated sarcoma.

TREATMENT AND OUTCOME

A hemipelvectomy was performed, and histologic evaluation of the soft tissue mass confirmed the diagnosis, with tumor-free margins achieved. The patient recovered well from surgery and had good mobility. The patient survived 21 months after surgery and died of a non–cancer-related disease. Anatomic dissection was described in a cadaver rabbit to aid future surgeries.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

To the authors’ knowledge, this was the first report of a hemipelvectomy performed in a rabbit. Hemipelvectomy is more routinely performed in canine and feline patients, but with the right candidate and owner commitment to aftercare, it may be safely and successfully performed in rabbits.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To investigate the prevalence of pulmonary nodules suggestive of metastasis at the time of initial presentation in dogs with cutaneous or subcutaneous soft tissue sarcomas (STSs) and no previous related thoracic diagnostic imaging.

ANIMALS

146 client-owned dogs with a cutaneous or subcutaneous STS.

PROCEDURES

Medical records were retrospectively searched to identify dogs with STSs that underwent initial thoracic diagnostic imaging when presented for referral examination between September 2014 and March 2018. Data collected included patient and tumor characteristics. Results were evaluated for dogs grouped on the basis of variables of interest (eg, STS grade, duration, or history).

RESULTS

Initial thoracic imaging was performed with CT (131/146 [89.7%]) or radiography (15 [10.3%]). Although the presence or absence of pulmonary nodules suggestive of metastasis on thoracic imaging was uncertain in 9 dogs, it was certain in the remaining 137 dogs, with nodules present in 16 (11.7%) dogs (5/77 [6%] with grade 1 STSs, 2/36 [6%] with grade 2 STSs, and 9/24 [38%] with grade 3 STSs). The odds of such pulmonary nodules being present on initial examination were higher (OR, 10.8 and 3.14, respectively) for dogs with grade 3 STSs (vs grade 1 or 2 STSs) and for dogs with an STS duration > 3 months (versus ≤ 3 months).

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Results indicated that pulmonary staging was a low-yield diagnostic procedure for dogs with grade 1 or 2 cutaneous or subcutaneous STSs, especially when tumors had been present for ≤ 3 months.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

CASE DESCRIPTION 4 dogs were examined because of pleural effusion and ventricular tachycardia, coughing and supraventricular tachycardia, appendicular osteosarcoma, and syncopal episodes.

CLINICAL FINDINGS In all 4 dogs, a heart base tumor was identified by means of thoracic CT.

TREATMENT AND OUTCOME In all 4 dogs, the heart base tumors were treated by means of stereotactic body radiation therapy. Dogs were anesthetized, and neuromuscular blockade was achieved with atracurium or vecuronium. A circle rebreathing system with 15 m (50 feet) of anesthetic tubing coursing through the vault wall was used to connect the patient to the anesthesia machine, which was located in the control room. After a brief period of hyperventilation, an inspiratory breath was held at 20 cm H2O for the duration of beam delivery. Each beam delivery lasted between 30 and 100 seconds. Immediately following the breath hold, assisted ventilation was resumed. Mean treatment delivery time for each patient was 26 minutes; mean total anesthesia time was 89 minutes. All patients recovered without complications. There was no evidence of hemoglobin desaturation or hypercapnia during the anesthetic procedure.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE The technique allowed for control of the respiration cycle from outside the radiation vault and a short overall treatment time. No adverse effects were encountered. This procedure should be considered when delivering radiation to structures within the thoracic cavity.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To determine the efficacy of primary re-excision alone for treatment of soft tissue sarcomas after recent incomplete resection, the frequency and clinical importance of detecting residual tumor in resected scars, and prognostic factors associated with the procedure.

Design—Retrospective case series.

Animals—41 dogs.

Procedures—Medical records of dogs that had undergone recent incomplete excision of a soft tissue sarcoma at a referring veterinary practice and subsequent re-excision of the scar at the Colorado State University Veterinary Medical Center were reviewed.Owners and referring veterinarians were contacted for follow-up information.Slides from re-excised specimens were reviewed.Dogs that underwent radiation therapy after the re-excision procedure were excluded.

Results—41 dogs met the inclusion criteria, and long-term follow-up information was available for 39 dogs.Median follow-up time was 816 days.Local recurrence of tumor developed in 6 of 39 (15%) dogs, and distant metastasis occurred in 4 of 39 (10%) dogs.Healthy tis sue margins of 0.5 to 3.5 cm were achieved at re-excision. Residual tumor was identified in 9 of 41 (22%) resected scars.No tumor-, patient-, or treatment-related variables were associated with local recurrence except for the presence of liposarcoma or fibrosarcoma or whether fine-needle aspiration had been performed prior to surgery.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—After incomplete resection of soft tissue sarcomas, resection of local tissue should be performed, even if excisable tissue margins appear narrow.A long-term favorable prognosis is achievable without radiation therapy or amputation. The presence of residual tumor in resected scar tissue should not be used to predict local recurrence.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of an alternating carboplatin and doxorubicin chemotherapy protocol in dogs with putative microscopic metastases after amputation for appendicular osteosarcoma and assess patient-, tumor-, and treatment-related factors for associations with prognosis.

Design—Retrospective case series.

Animals—50 client-owned dogs.

Procedures—Records of dogs that underwent amputation for appendicular osteosarcoma and received an alternating carboplatin and doxorubicin chemotherapy protocol were reviewed. Dogs had full staging and were free of detectable metastases prior to chemotherapy. Data on disease-free interval (DFI), survival time, and toxicoses were retrieved from medical records and owner or referring veterinarian communications.

Results—Median DFI was 202 days. Median survival time was 258 days. Twenty-nine (58%) dogs completed the protocol as planned, and the rest were withdrawn typically because of metastases or toxicoses. Grade 3 or 4 myelosuppression was reported in 9 of 50 (18%) dogs and grade 3 or 4 gastrointestinal toxicosis in 6 of 50 (12%) dogs. There were no chemotherapy-related fatalities. Univariate factors associated with significant improvement in DFI included tumor location (radius), receiving doxorubicin as the first drug, starting chemotherapy more than 14 days after amputation, and no rib lesions on preamputation bone scans. Multivariate factors associated with a significant improvement in survival time were tumor location (radius) and completing chemotherapy.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Alternating administration of carboplatin and doxorubicin resulted in DFI and survival time similar to those reported for single-agent protocols. Clients should be counseled regarding the likelihood of toxicoses. Relevance of sequence and timing of starting chemotherapy should be further evaluated.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Case Description—A 4-year-old spayed female Boxer was evaluated for a cutaneous mass located on the dorsum. The mass had been present for 6 weeks and was increasing in size.

Clinical Findings—A mass of approximately 10 cm in diameter was detected on the dorsum cranial to the right ilial wing. Histologic examination of a tissue sample from the mass led to the diagnosis of cutaneous pythiosis. Computed tomography of the abdomen and the mass were performed and revealed a contrast-enhancing soft tissue mass of the dorsum and enlarged intra-abdominal lymph nodes.

Treatment and Outcome—The dog underwent surgical excision of the cutaneous mass, including 5-cm skin margins and deep margins of 2 fascial planes. The mass was completely excised on the basis of results of histologic examination of surgical margins. The dog received itraconazole and terbinafine by mouth for 3 months following surgery. Recheck examination at 20 months postoperatively showed no signs of recurrence of pythiosis at the surgical site.

Clinical Relevance—Aggressive surgical excision in combination with medical treatment resulted in a favorable long-term (> 1 year) outcome in this dog. Thorough workup including diagnostic imaging and lymph node evaluation is recommended. If surgery is to be performed, skin margins of 5 cm and deep margins of 2 fascial planes are recommended.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Case Description—A 5-month-old neutered male Golden Retriever was evaluated because of moderate stridor, exercise intolerance, and dyspnea. The dog had been neutered 3 weeks previously, and the referring veterinarian identified a large fluid-filled swelling on the left lateral aspect of the larynx during anesthetic intubation for that surgery. The referring veterinarian drained fluid from the mass by use of needle centesis via the oral cavity, which resulted in temporary improvement in clinical signs; however, the clinical signs returned soon thereafter.

Clinical Findings—A large, soft, spherical mass was located between the left arytenoid and thyroid cartilages and axial to the left ceratohyoid bone, thus causing partial obstruction of the rima glottidis. Laryngoscopic examination, computed tomography (CT), and cytologic evaluation of aspirates performed before surgery; examination during surgery; and histologic evaluation of tissues following surgical excision confirmed the diagnosis of a laryngeal cyst.

Treatment and Outcome—Complete surgical excision was successfully performed via a lateral extraluminal approach to the larynx. One week after surgery, the dog coughed only occasionally. Twelve months after surgery, the owner reported that the dog was clinically normal with no recurrence of clinical signs, and laryngoscopic examination revealed no recurrence of the cyst or other pathological changes in the laryngeal region.

Clinical Relevance—Congenital laryngeal cysts are rarely reported in domestic animals. The information provided here described the CT appearance of a laryngeal cyst and the use of CT in diagnosis and surgical planning. Congenital laryngeal cysts can be resected via a lateral submucosal approach.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate outcomes of radical excision of feline injection-site sarcomas (ISS) via assessment of local recurrence and metastasis rates, survival times, and complications associated with surgery.

Design—Retrospective case series.

Animals—91 cats with ISS.

Procedures—Medical records of cats that had radical excision of ISS without adjunctive treatment were reviewed. Information extracted included sex, type of surgical procedure, histologic tumor grade, tumor diameter, time from tumor detection to definitive surgery, complications associated with surgery, whether tumors recurred locally or metastasized, and survival times. Diagnosis of ISS was histologically confirmed, and additional follow-up was performed.

Results—Overall median survival time was 901 days. Thirteen of 91 (14%) cats had local tumor recurrence; 18 (20%) cats had evidence of metastasis after surgery. Median survival time of cats with and without recurrence was 499 and 1,461 days, respectively. Median survival time of cats with and without metastasis was 388 and 1,528 days, respectively. Tumor recurrence and metastasis were significantly associated with survival time, whereas other examined variables were not. Major complications occurred in 10 cats, including 7 with incisional dehiscence.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Radical excision of ISS resulted in a metastasis rate similar to rates reported previously; the local recurrence rate appeared to be substantially less than rates reported after less aggressive surgeries, with or without adjuvant treatment. Major complication rates were similar to rates reported previously after aggressive surgical resection of ISS. Radical excision may be a valuable means of attaining an improved outcome in the treatment of feline ISS.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To describe outcomes for small-breed dogs with appendicular osteosarcoma.

Design—Multi-institutional retrospective case series.

Animals—51 small-breed dogs.

Procedures—Records from participating Veterinary Society of Surgical Oncology members were searched for dogs that weighed ≤ 15 kg (33 lb) with a histologic diagnosis of appendicular osteosarcoma. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to determine median survival times (MSTs), and Cox regression was performed to identify variables associated with survival time.

Results—Tumors were most commonly located on the humerus (n = 15) and femur (14). Of the 51 study dogs, 9 were treated nonsurgically, 16 underwent amputation of the affected limb only, and 26 underwent curative-intent treatment, with MSTs of 112, 257, and 415 days, respectively. The MST did not differ significantly between dogs in the amputation-only and curative-intent groups. For dogs in the nonsurgical group, MST decreased significantly as the tumor histologic score increased. For dogs in the amputation-only group, MST decreased as body weight increased.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—For the small-breed dogs with appendicular osteosarcoma of the present study, tumor histologic grade and mitotic index were subjectively lower and MST following amputation of the affected limb without adjuvant chemotherapy was longer, compared with those for similarly affected larger dogs. Results indicated no significant advantage in MST for dogs that underwent curative-intent treatment versus dogs that underwent amputation only, and further investigation of the importance of adjuvant chemotherapy is warranted.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate postmortem surgery site leakage by use of in situ isolated pulsatile perfusion after partial liver lobectomies.

Animals—10 healthy mixed-breed male dogs.

Procedures—Dogs were anesthetized, and 5 surgical techniques (pretied suture loop, energy-based sealer-divider, harmonic scalpel, suction with clip application, or suction with use of a thoracoabdominal stapler) were used to perform 5 partial liver lobectomies in each dog. Dogs were euthanatized, and the portal vein and hepatic artery were cannulated and perfused with a modified kidney perfusion machine (pulsatile flow for arterial perfusion and nonpulsatile flow for portal perfusion). Lobectomy sites were inspected for leakage of perfusate, and time until detection of leakage was recorded. The techniques in each dog were ranked on the basis of time until leakage. Time until leakage and rankings for each surgical technique were analyzed by use of an ANOVA.

Results—Leakage of perfusate was recorded in 44 lobes at supraphysiologic pressures. Of the 6 lobes without leakage, a pretied suture loop procedure was performed in 5 and a harmonic scalpel procedure was performed in 1. Time until leakage and the ranking differed significantly between the pretied suture loop and the other techniques. Time until leakage and ranking did not differ significantly among the other techniques.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Time until leakage of perfusate was greater for the pretied suture loop technique than for the other techniques, and that technique did not fail in 5 of 10 lobes. However, all techniques appeared to be safe for clinical use.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research