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Preface

The Compendium of Measures to Prevent Disease Associated with Animals in Public Settings has been published by the NASPHV and CDC since 2005. 1 The compendium provides standardized recommendations for public health officials, veterinarians, animal venue operators, animal exhibitors, visitors to animal venues and exhibits, and others concerned with control of disease and with minimizing health risks associated with animal contact in public settings. The report has undergone several revisions, and this document substantially updates information provided in the 2011 compendium. 2

Introduction

Contact with animals in public settings (eg, fairs, educational farms, petting zoos, and schools) provides

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To assess the number of zoonotic disease outbreaks associated with animal exhibits and identify published recommendations for preventing zoonotic disease transmission from animals to people in exhibit settings.

Design—Literature review and survey of state public health veterinarians and state epidemiologists.

Procedure—MEDLINE and agriculture databases were searched from 1966 through 2000. Retrieved references and additional resources provided by the authors were reviewed. A survey was sent to state public health veterinarians and state epidemiologists to determine whether their states had written recommendations or guidelines for controlling zoonotic diseases in animal exhibition venues, whether their states maintained a listing of animal exhibitors in the state, and whether they had any information on recent outbreaks involving animals in exhibitions.

Results—11 published outbreaks were identified. These outbreaks occurred in a variety of settings including petting zoos, farms, and a zoological park. An additional episode involving exposure to a potentially rabid bear required extensive public health resources. A survey of state public health veterinarians identified 16 additional unpublished outbreaks or incidents. Most states did not have written recommendations or guidelines for controlling zoonotic diseases or any means to disseminate educational materials to animal exhibitors.

Conclusions—Recent outbreaks of zoonotic diseases associated with contact with animals in exhibition venues highlight concerns for disease transmission to public visitors. Only a handful of states have written guidelines for preventing zoonotic disease transmission in animal exhibition venues, and published recommendations currently available focus on preventing enteric diseases and largely do not address other zoonotic diseases or prevention of bite wounds. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2004;224:1105–1109)

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
Preface

The Compendium of Measures to Prevent Disease Associated with Animals in Public Settings has been published by the NASPHV and the CDC since 2005. 1–3 This compendium provides standardized recommendations for public health officials, veterinarians, animal venue operators, animal exhibitors, visitors to animal venues and exhibits, teachers, camp operators, and others concerned with control of disease and with minimizing health risks associated with animal contact in public settings. The report has undergone several revisions, and this document updates information provided in the 2013 compendium. 3

I. Introduction

Contact with animals in public settings (eg, fairs, educational farms, petting

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Rabies is a fatal viral zoonosis and a serious public health problem. 1 All mammals are believed to be susceptible to the disease, and for purposes of this document, use of the term animal refers to mammals. The disease is an acute, progressive encephalitis caused by a lyssavirus. Rabies virus is the most important lyssavirus globally. In the United States, multiple rabies virus variants are maintained in wild mammalian reservoir populations, such as raccoons, skunks, foxes, and bats. Although the United States has been declared free from transmission of canine rabies virus variants, there is always a risk of

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Rabies is a fatal viral zoonosis and serious public health problem. 1 All mammals are believed to be susceptible to the disease, and for the purposes of this document, use of the term animal refers to mammals. The disease is an acute, progressive encephalitis caused by viruses in the genus Lyssavirus. 2 Rabies virus is the most important lyssavirus globally. In the United States, multiple rabies virus variants are maintained in wild mammalian reservoir populations such as raccoons, skunks, foxes, and bats. Although the United States has been declared free from transmission of canine rabies virus

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association