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  • Author or Editor: N. Bari Olivier x
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Abstract

Objective—To determine the effect of semen in urine specimens on urine protein concentration measured by means of dipstick analysis.

Sample Population—14 urine samples from 3 adult castrated male dogs and 14 semen samples from 7 adult sexually intact male dogs.

Procedures—Serial dilutions of the whole ejaculate or spermatozoa-free seminal fluid in urine were created, and unaltered and diluted urine samples were analyzed by means of a commercially available dipstick; pH and specific gravity of the samples were also measured. Spermatozoa and WBC counts of the semen samples and protein concentration of the seminal fluid were determined.

Results—Protein concentrations determined by means of dipstick analysis of urine samples to which whole ejaculate (dilutions of 1:1, 1:2, 1:16, 1:64, and 1:256) or seminal fluid (dilutions of 1:1, 1:2, 1:16, and 1:64) had been added were significantly higher than concentrations in unaltered urine samples. All 13 samples to which whole ejaculate was added at a dilution of 1:2 and 10 of 12 samples to which seminal fluid was added at a dilution of 1:2 were positive for blood on dipstick analysis. There was no significant linear correlation between spermatozoa or WBC count of the semen sample and protein concentration of the spermatozoa-free seminal fluid.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggested that regardless of whether spermatozoa were present, semen contamination could result in false-positive results for protein and blood during dipstick analysis of urine samples from sexually intact male dogs.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate short-term hemodynamic effects of ecadotril in a model of congestive heart failure in dogs.

Animals—6 conscious adult male dogs.

Procedures—Instruments were placed in dogs to measure left ventricular, aortic, and atrial blood pressures. Heart failure was induced by repeated coronary embolization with latex microspheres. Four times, and in random order, dogs were given vehicle or active drug (3, 10, or 30 mg/kg of body weight) orally. Hemodynamic variables, urine flow, and urinary electrolyte excretion were measured before and 30, 90, and 150 minutes, and 10 and 21 hours after drug administration.

Results—Changes in urine flow, heart rate, mean arterial pressure, or peak positive and negative rate of change in ventricular pressure were not apparent. Urinary sodium excretion significantly increased in response to the low and high doses of ecadotril but not in response to the 10 mg/kg dose. Left ventricular end diastolic pressure (LVEDP) consistently decreased in dose- and time-dependent manner. Maximal group-averaged reductions in LVEDP were 5.2, 8.1, and 10 mm Hg for the low, middle, and high doses, respectively. The magnitude of the decrease in LVEDP was not related to cumulative change in urine flow.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Orally administered ecadotril reduced left ventricular filling pressures in these dogs by a mechanism that does not require a substantial diuretic effect. Ecadotril may be effective for alleviating clinical signs in dogs with left-sided heart failure and may be particularly beneficial for use in dogs that are refractory to traditional diuretic therapy. (Am J Vet Res 2000;61: 334–339)

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To evaluate pharmacokinetics of ammonium tetrathiomolybdate (TTM) after IV and oral administration to dogs and effects of TTM administration on trace mineral concentrations.

ANIMALS 8 adult Beagles and Beagle crossbreds (4 sexually intact males and 4 sexually intact females).

PROCEDURES Dogs received TTM (1 mg/kg) IV and orally in a randomized crossover study. Serum molybdenum and copper concentrations were measured via inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry in samples obtained 0 to 72 hours after administration. Pharmacokinetics was determined via noncompartmental analysis.

RESULTS For IV administration, mean ± SD terminal elimination rate constant, maximum concentration, area under the curve, and half-life were 0.03 ± 0.01 hours−1, 4.9 ± 0.6 μg/mL, 30.7 ± 5.4 μg/mL•h, and 27.7 ± 6.8 hours, respectively. For oral administration, mean ± SD terminal elimination rate constant, time to maximum concentration, maximum concentration, area under the curve, and half-life were 0.03 ± 0.01 hours−1, 3.0 ± 3.5 hours, 0.2 ± 0.4 μg/mL, 6.5 ± 8.0 μg/mL•h, and 26.8 ± 8.0 hours, respectively. Oral bioavailability was 21 ± 22%. Serum copper concentrations increased significantly after IV and oral administration. Emesis occurred after IV (2 dogs) and oral administration (3 dogs).

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Pharmacokinetics for TTM after a single IV and oral administration was determined for clinically normal dogs. Absorption of TTM after oral administration was variable. Increased serum copper concentrations suggested that TTM mobilized tissue copper. Further studies will be needed to evaluate the potential therapeutic use of TTM in copper-associated chronic hepatitis of dogs.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To determine whether autologous jugular veins provide functional grafts with high 30-day patency rates in an experimental model of systemic-to-pulmonary shunting performed with a modified Blalock-Taussig procedure.

Animals—15 healthy Beagles.

Procedure—A segment of the left jugular vein was implanted between the left subclavian and pulmonary arteries. Echocardiograms were obtained prior to surgery, at day 4 to 7, and at day 30 after surgery. Selective angiograms were performed immediately after surgery and on day 30. Oximetric shunt calculations were made via terminal angiography prior to euthanasia. Gross and histologic evaluations of the grafts were conducted.

Results—Grafts were patent in 12 of 15 dogs 30 days after surgery as assessed via auscultation, color Doppler ultrasonography, angiography, and histologic examination. Echocardiographic analysis revealed compensatory eccentric left ventricular hypertrophy. Mean pulmonary-to-systemic flow ratio was 1.5:1. Histologic evidence of endothelialization of the anastomotic sites and vein graft arterialization was detectable at 30 days.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Autologous jugular vein grafts were effectively used to create a systemic-to-pulmonary shunt by use of a modified Blalock-Taussig procedure. High patency, ready accessibility, low cost, and theoretical adaptative remodeling during patient growth make autologous jugular vein grafts a valuable alternative to synthetic materials.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research