Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 2 of 2 items for

  • Author or Editor: Mustafa Elarbi x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All Modify Search

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To develop and validate a simulation model for laparoscopic ovariectomy in standing horses.

DESIGN Prospective cohort study.

SAMPLE 15 third-year veterinary students and 4 equine surgeons with experience in laparoscopy.

PROCEDURES A simulation model that mimicked laparoscopic ovariectomy in standing horses was developed. Face validity of the model was determined with a questionnaire completed by the equine surgeons. Construct validity was determined by comparing performance scores (based on time to completion and accuracy completing various operative tasks) for simulated laparoscopic ovariectomy performed in the model for the students with scores for the equine surgeons. Concurrent validity was assessed by comparing performance scores with scores obtained with the validated McGill Inanimate System for Training and Evaluation of Laparoscopic Skills (MISTELS).

RESULTS Questionnaire responses indicated that the simulation model replicated the operative experience to a high degree (face validity). Performance scores for simulated laparoscopic ovariectomy performed in the model were significantly different between the students and the equine surgeons (construct validity). Performance scores for the simulation model were significantly correlated with scores for the MISTELS (concurrent validity).

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results suggested that the simulation model had face, construct, and concurrent validity, suggesting that it may be useful when training students to perform laparoscopic ovariectomy in standing horses.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To develop and evaluate a high-fidelity simulated laparoscopic ovariectomy (SLO) model for surgical training and testing.

DESIGN Evaluation study.

SAMPLE 15 veterinary students (novice group), 5 veterinary surgical interns or residents (intermediate group), and 6 veterinary surgeons (experienced group).

PROCEDURES Laparoscopic surgery experience was assessed by questionnaire and visual analog scales. Basic laparoscopic skills were assessed with a commercial training model. A commercial canine abdomen model was customized with a high-fidelity simulated canine female genital tract. Each subject's SLO performance (laparoscopic entry, dissection along marked planes, and left ovariectomy) was evaluated by measurement of surgical time and errors (splenic puncture and deviation from dissection marks) and with global and operative component rating scales. Construct and concurrent validity were assessed by correlation of SLO results with self-estimated measures of experience level and with basic laparoscopic skills test results, respectively. Face validity was assessed with a questionnaire completed by intermediate and experienced group participants.

RESULTS 13 participants (3/15, 5/5, and 5/6 in the novice, intermediate, and experienced groups, respectively) completed SLO within the preset time. No difference in errors was found among groups. Completion time was significantly correlated with self-estimated experience level (r = −0.626), confirming construct validity, and with basic laparoscopic skills scores (r = −0.552) and global (r = −0.624) and operative component (r = −0.624) rating scale scores, confirming concurrent validity. Overall mean face validity score was low (64.2/100); usefulness of the model for surgical training received the highest score (8/10).

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results suggested the SLO model may be a useful surgical training tool. Further studies are needed to confirm usefulness of the model in veterinary laparoscopy training.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association