Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 4 of 4 items for

  • Author or Editor: Mushtaq A. Memon x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All Modify Search
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To obtain information on educational programs offered in complementary and alternative veterinary medicine (CAVM) among AVMA Council on Education (COE)-accredited colleges and schools of veterinary medicine.

Design—Survey.

Sample—41 COE-accredited colleges and schools of veterinary medicine.

Procedure—A questionnaire was e-mailed to academic deans at all COE-accredited colleges and schools of veterinary medicine.

Results—Responses were received from 34 of 41 schools: 26 in the United States, 2 in Canada, 3 in Australia and New Zealand, and 3 in Europe. Sixteen schools indicated that they offered a CAVM course. Nutritional therapy, acupuncture, and rehabilitation or physical therapy were topics most commonly included in the curriculum. One school required a course in CAVM; all other courses were elective, most of which were 1 to 2 credit hours. Courses were usually a combination of lecture and laboratory; 2 were lecture only, and 1 was laboratory only. Of the 18 schools that reported no courses in CAVM, many addressed some CAVM topics in other courses and 4 indicated plans to offer some type of CAVM course within the next 5 years.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—The consensus among survey respondents was that CAVM is an important topic that should be addressed in veterinary medical education, but opinions varied as to the appropriate framework. The most common comment reflected strong opinions that inclusion of CAVM in veterinary medical curricula must be evidence-based. Respondents indicated that students should be aware of CAVM modalities because of strong public interest in CAVM and because practitioners should be able to address client questions from a position of knowledge.

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To determine the effect of the 5α-reductase inhibitor finasteride on prostatic diameter and volume, semen quality, and serum dihydrotestosterone (DHT) and testosterone concentrations in dogs with spontaneous benign prostatic hypertrophy (BPH).

Design—Double-blind placebo-controlled trial.

Animals—9 dogs with BPH.

Procedure—Five dogs were treated with finasteride for 16 weeks (0.1 to 0.5 mg/kg [0.05 to 0.23 mg/lb] of body weight, PO, q 24 h); the other 4 received a placebo. Prostatic diameter, measured radiographically, prostatic volume, measured ultrasonographically, semen quality, and serum DHT and testosterone concentrations were evaluated before and during treatment. After receiving the placebo for 16 weeks, the 4 control dogs were treated with finasteride for 16 weeks, and evaluations were repeated.

Results—Finasteride significantly decreased prostatic diameter (mean percentage decrease, 20%), prostatic volume (mean percentage decrease, 43%), and serum DHT concentration (mean percentage decrease, 58%). Finasteride decreased semen volume but did not adversely effect semen quality or serum testosterone concentration. No adverse effects were reported by owners of dogs in the study.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggest that finasteride can be used to reduce prostatic size in dogs with BPH without adversely affecting semen quality or serum testosterone concentration. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2001;218:1275–1280)

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association