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  • Author or Editor: Molly E. McCue x
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Abstract

Objective—To estimate the prevalence of polysaccharide storage myopathy (PSSM) among Quarter Horses in the United States and evaluate possible relationships between muscle glycogen concentration, turnout time, and exercise level.

Design—Cross-sectional study.

Animals—164 overtly healthy Quarter Horses > 2 years old from 5 states.

Procedures—Horses with a history of exertional rhabdomyolysis or any other muscular disease were excluded. Muscle biopsy specimens were examined histologically for evidence of PSSM and were submitted for determination of muscle glycogen concentration. A diagnosis of PSSM was made if amylase-resistant inclusions that stained with periodic acid–Schiff stain were detected.

Results—Prevalences of PSSM on the 2 farms with a history of PSSM were 20% (1/5) and 40.7% (11/27); mean prevalence for the other 4 farms was 6.1% (8/132). Sex was not significantly associated with a diagnosis of PSSM, and age was not significantly different between horses with and without PSSM. Total histologic score, serum creatine kinase ac-tivity, and muscle glycogen concentration were significantly higher in horses with PSSM than in horses without.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggested that the prevalence of PSSM among overtly healthy Quarter Horses in the United States is likely to be between 6% and 12%.

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate effects of fats with odd and even numbers of carbon atoms on muscle metabolism in exercising horses with polysaccharide storage myopathy (PSSM).

Animals—8 horses with PSSM (6 females and 2 males; mean ± SD age, 6.3 ± 3.9 years).

Procedures—Isocaloric diets (grain, triheptanoin, corn oil, and high-fat, low-starch [HFLS] feed) were fed for 3 weeks each; horses performed daily treadmill exercise. Grain was fed to establish an exercise target, and HFLS feed was fed as a negative control diet. Daily plasma samples were obtained. For each diet, a 15-minute exercise test was performed, and gluteus medius muscle specimens and blood samples were obtained before and after exercise.

Results—Feeding triheptanoin, compared with the corn oil diet, resulted in exercise intolerance; higher plasma creatine kinase (CK) activity and concentrations of C3:0- and C7:0-acylcarnitine and insulin; and lower concentrations of nonesterified fatty acids (NEFA) and C16:0-, C18:1-, and C18:2-acylcarnitine, without changes in concentrations of plasma glucose or resting muscle substrates and metabolites. Feeding grain induced higher CK activity and insulin concentrations and lower NEFA concentrations than did corn oil or HFLS feed. Feeding grain induced higher glucose concentrations than did triheptanoin and corn oil. In muscle, feeding grain resulted in lower glucose-6-phosphate, higher citrate, and higher postexercise lactate concentrations than did the other diets.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Triheptanoin had detrimental effects, reflecting decreased availability of NEFA, increased insulin stimulation of glycogen synthesis, and potential inhibition of lipid oxidation. Long-chain fats are the best dietetic for PSSM.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To compare effects of corn oil or a 7-carbon fat (triheptanoin) on acylcarnitine, lipid, and carbohydrate metabolism in plasma or muscle of exercising horses.

Animals—8 Thoroughbred geldings.

Procedures—Horses received isocaloric diets containing 650 mL of oil (triheptanoin or corn oil)/d for 18 or 25 days in a crossover design with a 26-day washout period. On day 17 or 24 of each feeding period, the respective oil (217 mL) was nasogastrically administered; 120 minutes later, horses performed a 90-minute submaximal exercise test (SET). Blood and muscle samples were obtained before oil administration and immediately before (blood only), during (blood only), immediately after, and 24 hours after SETs.

Results—Compared with values before oil administration, triheptanoin administration increased plasma insulin and C7:0-, C5:0- and C3:0-acylcarnitine concentrations, whereas corn oil administration increased plasma NEFA concentrations. During SETs, plasma C7:0-, C5:0-, and C3:0-acylcarnitine concentrations were higher when triheptanoin, rather than corn oil, was administered to horses. Plasma glucose, NEFA, and C2:0-, C18:1-, and C18:2-acylcarnitine concentrations increased during SETs similarly for both oils. Respiratory quotient and muscle lactate, citrate, malate, glycogen, and ATP concentrations changed similarly from before to after SETs for both oils. Compared with muscle concentrations immediately after SETs, those for glucose-6-phosphate and citrate 24 hours after SETs were lower and for glycogen were similar to values before SETs.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Fatigue was not associated with depletion of citric acid cycle intermediates for either oil. Triheptanoin induced a significantly higher insulin secretion and did not appear to enhance muscle glycogen repletion.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate whether biochemical or genetic alterations in AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) play a role in the development of polysaccharide storage myopathy (PSSM) in Quarter Horses.

Animals—30 PSSM-affected and 30 unaffected (control) Quarter Horses.

Procedures—By use of an established peptide phosphotransfer assay, basal and maximal AMPK activities were measured in muscle biopsy samples obtained from 6 PSSM-affected and 6 control horses. In 24 PSSM-affected and 24 control horses, microsatellite markers identified from the chromosomal locations of all 7 AMPK subunit genes were genotyped with a fluorescent DNA fragment analyzer. Alleles of 2 of the AMPK γ subunit genes were genotyped via DNA sequencing. Allele frequencies of DNA markers in or near the AMPK subunit genes were measured in isolated genomic DNA.

Results—No differences in basal or maximal muscle AMPK enzyme activities between PSSM-affected and control horses were detected. There were also no differences in allele frequencies for microsatellite markers near any of the 7 AMPK subunit genes between the 2 groups. Furthermore, previously known and newly identified alleles of 2 equine AMPK γ subunit genes were also not associated with PSSM.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—These results have provided no evidence to indicate that AMPK plays a causative role in PSSM in American Quarter Horses.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To estimate allele frequencies of the hyperkalaemic periodic paralysis (HYPP), lethal white foal syndrome (LWFS), glycogen branching enzyme deficiency (GBED), hereditary equine regional dermal asthenia (HERDA), and type 1 polysaccharide storage myopathy (PSSM) genes in elite performance subgroups of American Quarter Horses (AQHs).

Design—Prospective genetic survey.

Animals—651 elite performance AQHs, 200 control AQHs, and 180 control American Paint Horses (APHs).

Procedures—Elite performance AQHs successful in 7 competitive disciplines (barrel racing, cutting, halter, racing, reining, western pleasure, and working cow horse) were geno- typed for 5 disease-causing alleles. Age-matched control AQHs and APHs were used to establish comparative whole-breed estimates of allele frequencies.

Results—Highest allele frequencies among control AQHs were for type 1 PSSM (0.055) and GBED (0.054), whereas HERDA (0.021) and HYPP (0.008) were less prevalent. Control APHs uniquely harbored LWFS (0.107) and had high prevalence of HYPP (0.025), relative to AQHs. Halter horse subgroups had significantly greater allele frequencies for HYPP (0.299) and PSSM (0.155). Glycogen branching enzyme deficiency, HERDA, and PSSM were found broadly throughout subgroups; cutting subgroups were distinct for HERDA (0.142), and western pleasure subgroups were distinct for GBED (0.132). Racing and barrel racing subgroups had the lowest frequencies of the 5 disease genes.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Accurate estimates of disease-causing alleles in AQHs and APHs may guide use of diagnostic genetic testing, aid management of genetic diseases, and help minimize production of affected foals.

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To investigate risk factors for the development of pasture- and endocrinopathy-associated laminitis (PEAL) in horses and ponies in North America.

DESIGN Case-control study.

ANIMALS 199 horses with incident cases of PEAL and 351 horses from 2 control populations (healthy horses [n = 198] and horses with lameness not caused by laminitis [153]) that were evaluated in North America between January 2012 and December 2015 by veterinarian members of the American Association of Equine Practitioners.

PROCEDURES North American members of the American Association of Equine Practitioners were contacted to participate in the study, and participating veterinarians provided historical data on incident cases of PEAL, each matched with a healthy control and a lameness control. Conditional logistic regression analysis was used to compare data on PEAL-affected horses with data on horses from each set of controls.

RESULTS Horses with an obese body condition (ie, body condition score ≥ 7), generalized or regional adiposity (alone or in combination), preexisting endocrinopathy, or recent (within 30 days) glucocorticoid administration had increased odds of developing PEAL, compared with horses that did not have these findings.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE The present study identified several risk factors for PEAL that may assist not only in managing and preventing this form of laminitis, but also in guiding future research into its pathogenesis.

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association