Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 4 of 4 items for

  • Author or Editor: Michelle L. Wagner x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All Modify Search

Abstract

Objective—To compare measurements of body temperature obtained with auricular thermometers versus rectal thermometers in dogs with otitis externa.

Design—Prospective study.

Animals—100 client-owned dogs: 50 with and 50 without clinical evidence of otitis externa.

Procedure—Dogs were evaluated for the presence of otitis externa on the basis of clinical signs, otoscopic examination, and cytologic evaluation of ear exudate. Auricular and rectal temperatures were obtained simultaneously in all dogs prior to and following ear examination.

Results—There was a high correlation between auricular and rectal temperatures in dogs with otitis externa both prior to and after ear manipulation. Significant differences were not detected in temperature measurements among dogs with different degrees of otitis externa.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Auricular temperature readings obtained by use of an auricular thermometer in dogs with otitis externa are accurate measurements of body temperature, compared with rectal temperature measurements. Temperature measurements are reliable before and after examination of the ear canal. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2002; 221:378–380)

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To develop a reliable method for converting cultured equine skin–derived fibroblasts into muscle cells.

Sample Population—Equine skin–derived fibroblasts.

Procedures—The equine myogenic differentiation 1 (eqMyoD) genomic sequence was obtained by use of equine bacterial artificial chromosome screening and PCR sequencing. Total mRNA was extracted from foal skeletal muscle, and eqMyoD cDNA was cloned into a plasmid vector with an internal ribosomal entry site to express bicistronic eqMyoD or enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP). Transient expression was confirmed by immunocytochemical analysis and western immunoblots in equine fibroblasts and fibroblasts from National Institutes of Health Swiss mouse embryos, prior to generation of a lentiviral vector containing the same coding sequences. Transformation of equine skin–derived cells into skeletal myotubes was examined by use of immunohistochemical analysis, western immunoblotting, and periodic acid–Schiff staining.

Results—eqMyoD mRNA consists of 960 bp and shares high homology with myogenic differentiation 1 from other mammals. Transfection confirmed the expression of a 53-kd protein with mainly nuclear localization. Lentiviral transduction was efficient, with approximately 80% of EGFP-positive cells transformed into multinucleated myotubes during 15 days, as determined by expression of the muscle-specific proteins desmin, troponin-T, and sarcomeric myosin and by cytoplasmic storage of glycogen.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Equine primary fibroblasts were transformed by lentiviral transduction of eqMyoD into fusion-competent myoblasts. This may offer a preferable alternative to primary myoblast cultures for the investigation of cellular defects associated with muscle diseases of horses, such as recurrent exertional rhabdomyolysis and polysaccharide storage myopathy.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To determine the suitability and estimate the sensitivity of an immunohistochemical (IHC) test for disease-associated prion protein (PrPSc) in biopsy specimens of rectoanal mucosa–associated lymphoid tissue (RAMALT) for diagnosis of scrapie in sheep.

Animals—762 sheep at high risk for having scrapie and indemnified by the National Scrapie Eradication Program.

Procedures—The IHC test for PrPSc was applied to 2 RAMALT and 2 third-eyelid biopsy specimens and a postmortem RAMALT specimen from each sheep. Results were compared with those of a reference test in which results for tissues from obex and retropharyngeal lymph nodes, tonsil, or both were considered in parallel.

Results—The reference test identified 139 sheep as having scrapie. Biopsy-related complications occurred in 3 sheep. Sensitivity of the IHC test in RAMALT ranged from 85.3% to 89.4%, depending on the anatomic location from which RAMALT was obtained. Results for the test applied to 1 RAMALT specimen were similar to results interpreted in parallel for 2 third-eyelid specimens (sensitivity, 87.0%). The proportion of inconclusive test results attributable to insufficient lymphoid follicles in biopsy specimens was lower when considering results for 2 RAMALT specimens in parallel (10.1%) than when considering results for 2 third-eyelid specimens in parallel (23.7%). Specimens of RAMALT that were inappropriately collected from an area caudal to the rectoanal interface yielded a high proportion of inconclusive results (33.3% to 50.0%).

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—The IHC test for PrPSc in RAMALT was an effective means of detecting subclinical scrapie in live, high-risk sheep.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To estimate allele frequencies of the hyperkalaemic periodic paralysis (HYPP), lethal white foal syndrome (LWFS), glycogen branching enzyme deficiency (GBED), hereditary equine regional dermal asthenia (HERDA), and type 1 polysaccharide storage myopathy (PSSM) genes in elite performance subgroups of American Quarter Horses (AQHs).

Design—Prospective genetic survey.

Animals—651 elite performance AQHs, 200 control AQHs, and 180 control American Paint Horses (APHs).

Procedures—Elite performance AQHs successful in 7 competitive disciplines (barrel racing, cutting, halter, racing, reining, western pleasure, and working cow horse) were geno- typed for 5 disease-causing alleles. Age-matched control AQHs and APHs were used to establish comparative whole-breed estimates of allele frequencies.

Results—Highest allele frequencies among control AQHs were for type 1 PSSM (0.055) and GBED (0.054), whereas HERDA (0.021) and HYPP (0.008) were less prevalent. Control APHs uniquely harbored LWFS (0.107) and had high prevalence of HYPP (0.025), relative to AQHs. Halter horse subgroups had significantly greater allele frequencies for HYPP (0.299) and PSSM (0.155). Glycogen branching enzyme deficiency, HERDA, and PSSM were found broadly throughout subgroups; cutting subgroups were distinct for HERDA (0.142), and western pleasure subgroups were distinct for GBED (0.132). Racing and barrel racing subgroups had the lowest frequencies of the 5 disease genes.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Accurate estimates of disease-causing alleles in AQHs and APHs may guide use of diagnostic genetic testing, aid management of genetic diseases, and help minimize production of affected foals.

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association