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  • Author or Editor: Michelle L. Haven x
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Summary

The medical records of 17 horses that were evaluated and treated because of colic caused by pedunculated lipomas between 1983 and 1990 were reviewed. The mean age of the horses was 16.6 ± 3.9 years (range, 10 to 26 years), which was significantly greater than that of the population of horses evaluated because of colic (control population) during the same period. There were significantly more geldings (76.5%), compared with the control population.

Nasogastric reflux ranged from 1 to 16 L in 8 horses and was not obtained in 9 horses. Abdominal palpation per rectum revealed small intestinal distention in 13 horses, displaced large colon in 7 horses, and large colon impaction in 2 horses. Peritoneal fluid was abnormal in 11 of 12 horses from which it was obtained successfully.

One horse was euthanatized after unsuccessful medical treatment. Surgery was performed in 16 horses. Lipomas were blindly resected in 5 horses or exteriorized and resected in 6 horses. The method used to resect the lipoma was not recorded in 5 horses. The ileum and/or jejunum was strangulated in 15 horses, the small colon was strangulated in 1 horse, and the jejunum was obstructed in 1 horse. The length of intestine resected ranged from 0.15 to 7.2 m.

Fourteen horses survived surgery, of which 11 were discharged from the hospital (short-term survival rate of 78.6%). Excluding 2 horses lost to follow-up evaluation, 6 of 12 horses that survived surgery were alive 2 to 56 months following surgery (long-term survival rate of 50%), and 9 of 15 horses died or were euthanatized (fatality rate of 60%).

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Summary

A single preoperative dose of antibiotic proved as effective as a preoperative and 7-day postoperative course in reducing complications following rumenotomy in cattle. Exploratory rumenotomy was performed on 29 healthy Angus steers, which were allotted to the following treatment groups: (1) no antibiotic therapy, (2) single-dose, preoperative, antibiotic prophylaxis, using potassium penicillin G, and (3) preoperative potassium penicillin G prophylaxis, followed by a 7-day postoperative course of procaine penicillin G. Steers receiving antibiotics had significantly greater postoperative feed intake, lower rectal temperatures, and fewer abscesses at the surgical site than those receiving no antibiotics. There was no significant difference between animals receiving a single preoperative dose of antibiotic and those treated for an additional 7 days after surgery. In human medicine, it is generally agreed that a single preoperative dose of antibiotic offers effective prophylaxis. There are few published reports on antimicrobial prophylaxis in the veterinary literature, particularly in regard to large animals. Considering USDA requirements for milk withholding times and withdrawal times prior to slaughter for food animals receiving antibiotics, the findings of this study have medical as well as economic value.

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association