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Summary

Seventy-two lactating dairy cows with left displacement of the abomasum were blindly assigned to treatment by use of the roll-and-toggle procedure or right paralumbar fossa pyloro-omentopexy. All cows were from the same large dairy herd, and survival in the herd and daily milk production were measured for 120 days after treatment. The mean cost was $256.50 for roll-and-toggle cases ($50 for the procedure, $95.70 in milk loss and $110.80 in livestock losses). The mean cost was $406.40 for the pyloro-omentopexy cases ($150 for the procedure, $87.80 in milk loss, and $168.60 in livestock losses). A possible interaction with metritis was discovered, in that pyloro-omentopexy cases cost about $100 more than roll-and-toggle cases when metritis was absent (31 cases) or moderate (32 cases), and cost several times more when metritis was severe (9 cases). Results of the study were in agreement with those of other studies that indicated that the closed repositioning and stabilization techniques are generally less expensive and have comparable results with open repositioning and stabilization techniques. Veterinarians may wish to consider use of this nonsurgical technique for the routine correction of left displacement of the abomasum in dairy cattle.

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Summary

We attempted to determine the extent to which nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) are used in the treatment of food animals, and whether withdrawal times for milk and slaughter are recommended to clients. A survey questionnaire was mailed to a stratified random sample of 2,000 veterinarians whose practices were at least half food animals. A cross-sectional study was used to examine the responses to determine whether differences existed on the basis of a respondent's geographic location, number of years since graduation from veterinary college, and percentage of practice devoted to beef and dairy cattle.

The response rate was 71% (1,424/2,000). Of those practitioners responding, 93% (1,325/1,424) reported using NSAID, with approximately 57 (751/1,322), 24 (327/1,322), and 18% (244/1,322) of respondents reporting use more than once a week, once a week, and 1 to 2 times per month, respectively. Dairy practitioners reported more frequent use than did beef practitioners. Use of flunixin meglumine was reported more frequently than the use of aspirin, phenylbutazone, or dipyrone. Approximately 88% (1,146/1,306) of respondents that used NSAID did so in combination with antibiotics. Withdrawal times for milk and meat were made on the basis of guidelines for the antibiotic. When using NSAID alone, recommendations for withdrawal times for milk and meat varied extensively. Overall, practitioners indicated that NSAID were useful and necessary for the treatment of food-producing animals.

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association