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A 1.5-year-old neutered male domestic shorthair cat was evaluated at an emergency veterinary hospital immediately after vehicular trauma. Blood in the cat's mouth and around the nose, severe dyspnea, and instability of the pelvic limbs were noted on initial examination. Radiographic findings included a complete left femoral diaphyseal fracture, fracture of the left maxillary canine tooth, a minimally displaced mandibular symphyseal fracture, and moderate bilateral pneumothorax. The cat was hospitalized overnight in an oxygen cage (40% oxygen) and monitored. The following day, the patient was transferred to its regular veterinarian; the cat was sedated (protocol unknown), and orotracheal intubation

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To compare the doses of propofol required to induce general anesthesia in dogs premedicated with acepromazine maleate or trazodone hydrochloride and compare the effects of these premedicants on cardiovascular variables in dogs anesthetized for orthopedic surgery.

DESIGN Prospective, randomized study.

ANIMALS 30 systemically healthy client-owned dogs.

PROCEDURES 15 dogs received acepromazine (0.01 to 0.03 mg/kg [0.005 to 0.014 mg/lb], IM) 30 minutes before anesthetic induction and 15 received trazodone (5 mg/kg [2.27 mg/lb] for patients > 10 kg or 7 mg/kg [3.18 mg/lb] for patients ≤ 10 kg, PO) 2 hours before induction. Both groups received morphine sulfate (1 mg/kg [0.45 mg/lb], IM) 30 minutes before induction. Anesthesia was induced with propofol (4 to 6 mg/kg [1.82 to 2.73 mg/lb], IV, to effect) and maintained with isoflurane or sevoflurane in oxygen. Bupivacaine (0.5 mg/kg [0.227 mg/lb]) and morphine (0.1 mg/kg [0.045 mg/lb]) were administered epidurally. Dogs underwent tibial plateau leveling osteotomy (n = 22) or tibial tuberosity advancement (8) and were monitored throughout anesthesia. Propofol induction doses and cardiovascular variables (heart rate and systemic, mean, and diastolic arterial blood pressures) were compared between groups.

RESULTS The mean dose of propofol required for anesthetic induction and all cardiovascular variables evaluated did not differ between groups. Intraoperative hypotension developed in 6 and 5 dogs of the acepromazine and trazodone groups, respectively; bradycardia requiring intervention developed in 3 dogs/group. One dog that received trazodone had priapism 24 hours later and was treated successfully. No other adverse effects were reported.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE At the described dosages, cardiovascular effects of trazodone were similar to those of acepromazine in healthy dogs undergoing anesthesia for orthopedic surgery.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To compare the cardiorespiratory effects of IM administration of dexmedetomidine-buprenorphine (DB) and dexmedetomidine-buprenorphine-ketamine (DBK) in dogs with subsequent reversal with atipamezole.

Design—Prospective, randomized crossover study.

Animals—5 healthy dogs.

Procedures—Dogs were instrumented for cardiac output (CO) measurement and received DB (15 μg of dexmedetomidine/kg [6.8 μg/lb] and 40 μg of buprenorphine/kg [18.2 μg/lb]) or DBK (DB plus 3 mg of ketamine/kg [1.36 mg/lb]) in randomized order while breathing room air. Atipamezole (150 μg/kg [68.2 μg/lb], IM) was administered 1 hour later. Hemodynamic data were collected in the conscious dogs and then at 5, 10, 15, 20, 30, 45, and 60 minutes after drug administration. Lactate concentration was measured in mixed venous blood samples. Oxygen delivery (Do 2) and oxygen consumption ( o 2) were calculated.

Results—Heart rate (HR), CO, and Do 2 decreased after DB and DBK administration. The o 2 did not change in the DB group but decreased in the DBK group. The HR was higher in the DBK group than in the DB group throughout the study, but the CO, Do 2, and o 2 values were similar for the 2 groups. Blood lactate concentrations remained low (< 1 mmol/L) throughout the study. Arterial hypoxemia and hypercapnea occurred in both groups. Mean arterial blood pressure and pulmonary artery wedge pressure were markedly increased in both groups, but to a greater extent in the DBK group. After atipamezole administration, HR, CO, and Do 2 returned to the baseline values.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Adding ketamine to the DB combination allowed dogs to maintain a higher HR and delayed the onset of sinus arrhythmias but failed to provide a significantly higher CO because of a reduction in stroke volume.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To compare the efficacy and cardiorespiratory effects of dexmedetomidine-ketamine in combination with butorphanol, hydromorphone, or buprenorphine with or without reversal by atipamezole in cats undergoing castration.

Design—Prospective, randomized, split-plot, blinded study.

Animals—30 healthy male cats.

Procedures—Cats were assigned to receive dexmedetomidine (25 μg/kg [11.4 μg/lb]) and ketamine (3 mg/kg [1.4 mg/lb]) with butorphanol (0.2 mg/kg [0.09 mg/lb]; DKBut; n = 10), hydromorphone (0.05 mg/kg [0.023 mg/lb]; DKH; 10), or buprenorphine (30 μg/kg [13.6 μg/lb]; DKBup; 10). Drugs were administered as a single IM injection. Supplemental isoflurane was administered to cats if the level of anesthesia was inadequate for surgery. At the conclusion of surgery, half the cats (5 cats in each treatment group) received atipamezole (250 μg/kg [113.6 μg/lb], IM) and the remainder received saline (0.9% NaCl) solution IM. All cats received meloxicam (0.2 mg/kg, SC) immediately prior to the conclusion of surgery.

Results—All drug combinations induced lateral recumbency, and intubation was achievable in 13 of 30 (43%) cats at 10 minutes after injection. Supplemental isoflurane was needed for the surgery in 1 of 10 of the DKBut-, 2 of 10 of the DKH-, and 7 of 10 of the DKBup-treated cats. Cats that received atipamezole had a significantly shorter recovery time.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—DKBut and DKH combinations were suitable injectable anesthetic protocols for castration in cats commencing at 10 minutes after injection, but cats receiving DKBup may require additional time or anesthetics for adequate anesthesia.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To compare the efficacy of preoperative administration of buprenorphine (via oral transmucosal [OTM] and IV routes) for postoperative analgesia in dogs undergoing ovariohysterectomy.

Design—Prospective, randomized, blinded study.

Animals—18 dogs undergoing routine ovariohysterectomy.

Procedures—Dogs were allocated to 3 groups (6 dogs/group) and were assigned to receive buprenorphine (20 μg/kg [9.09 μg/lb], IV; a low dose [20 μg/kg] via OTM administration [LOTM]; or a high dose [120 μg/kg [54.54 μg/lb] via OTM administration [HOTM]) immediately before anesthetic induction with propofol and maintenance with isoflurane for ovariohysterectomy. Postoperative pain was assessed by use of a dynamic interactive pain scale. Dogs were provided rescue analgesia when postoperative pain exceeded a predetermined threshold. Blood samples were collected, and liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry was used to determine plasma concentrations of buprenorphine and its metabolites. Data were analyzed with an ANOVA.

Results—Body weight, surgical duration, propofol dose, isoflurane concentration, and cardiorespiratory variables did not differ significantly among treatment groups. Number of dogs requiring rescue analgesia did not differ significantly for the HOTM (1/6), IV (3/6), and LOTM (5/6) treatments. Similarly, mean ± SEM duration of analgesia did not differ significantly for the HOTM (20.3 ± 3.7 hours), IV (16.0 ± 3.8 hours), and LOTM (7.3 ± 3.3 hours) treatments. Plasma buprenorphine concentration was ≤ 0.60 ng/mL in 7 of 9 dogs requiring rescue analgesia.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Buprenorphine (HOTM) given immediately before anesthetic induction can be an alternative for postoperative pain management in dogs undergoing ovariohysterectomy.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To compare efficacy and cardiorespiratory effects of dexmedetomidine and ketamine in combination with butorphanol, hydromorphone, or buprenorphine (with or without reversal by atipamezole) in dogs undergoing castration.

Design—Prospective, randomized, split-plot, blinded study.

Animals—30 healthy client-owned sexually intact male dogs.

Procedures—Dogs (n = 10 dogs/group) were assigned to receive dexmedetomidine (15 μg/kg [6.82 μg/lb]) and ketamine (3 mg/kg [1.36 mg/lb]) with butorphanol (0.2 mg/kg [0.09 mg/lb]; DKBut), the same dosages of dexmedetomidine and ketamine with hydromorphone (0.05 mg/kg [0.023 mg/lb]; DKH), or the same dosages of dexmedetomidine and ketamine with buprenorphine (40 μg/kg [18.18 μg/lb]; DKBup). All drugs were administered as a single IM injection for induction and maintenance of anesthesia for castration. At conclusion of the surgery, 5 dogs in each treatment group received atipamezole (150 μg/kg [68.18 μg/lb], IM), and the remainder received saline (0.9% NaCl) solution IM. Cardiorespiratory variables and quality of anesthesia were assessed. Supplemental isoflurane was administered to the dogs when anesthesia was considered inadequate during surgery.

Results—All drug combinations rapidly induced anesthesia. Dogs were intubated within 10 minutes after injection. Supplemental isoflurane was needed during surgery in 1, 3, and 4 dogs in the DKBup, DKBut, and DKH groups, respectively. Dogs that received atipamezole had a significantly shorter recovery time. Some dogs in each group had bradycardia and hypoxemia with hypertension.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—DKBup was the most suitable injectable anesthetic combination used. Recovery was shortened by IM administration of atipamezole. There were minimal adverse effects in all groups.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To determine the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of methadone after IV or IM administration to isoflurane-anesthetized chickens.

ANIMALS

6 healthy adult Hy-Line hens.

PROCEDURES

In a randomized crossover-design study, methadone (6 mg/kg) was administered IV and IM to isoflurane-anesthetized chickens with a 1-week washout period between experiments. Blood samples were collected immediately before and at predetermined time points up to 480 minutes after methadone administration. Plasma concentrations were determined by liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry, and appropriate compartmental models were fit to the plasma concentration-versus-time data. Cardiorespiratory variables were compared between treatments and over time with mixed-effect repeated-measures analysis.

RESULTS

A 3-compartment model best described the changes in plasma methadone concentration after IV or IM administration. Estimated typical values for volumes of distribution were 692 mL/kg for the central compartment and 2,439 and 2,293 mL/kg for the first and second peripheral compartments, respectively, with metabolic clearance of 23.3 mL/kg/min and first and second distributional clearances of 556.4 and 51.8 mL/kg/min, respectively. Typical bioavailability after IM administration was 79%. Elimination half-life was 177 minutes, and maximum plasma concentration after IM administration was 950 ng/mL. Heart rate was mildly decreased at most time points beginning 5 minutes after IV or IM drug administration.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Disposition of methadone in isoflurane-anesthetized chickens was characterized by a large volume of distribution and moderate clearance, with high bioavailability after IM administration. Additional studies are warranted to assess pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of methadone in awake chickens.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To evaluate the effect of a constant rate infusion of ketamine on cardiac index (CI) in sheep, as estimated using noninvasive cardiac output (NICO) monitoring by partial carbon dioxide rebreathing, when anesthetized with sevoflurane at the previously determined minimum alveolar concentration that blunts adrenergic responses (MACBAR).

ANIMALS

12 healthy Dorset-crossbred adult sheep.

PROCEDURES

Sheep were anesthetized 2 times in a balanced placebo-controlled crossover design. Anesthesia was induced with sevoflurane delivered via a tight-fitting face mask and maintained at MACBAR. Following induction, sheep received either ketamine (1.5 mg/kg IV, followed by a constant rate infusion of 1.5 mg/kg/h) or an equivalent volume of saline (0.9% NaCl) solution (placebo). After an 8-day washout period, each sheep received the alternate treatment. NICO measurements were performed in triplicate 20 minutes after treatment administration and were converted to CI. Blood samples were collected prior to the start of NICO measurements for analysis of ketamine plasma concentrations. The paired t test was used to compare CI values between groups and the ketamine plasma concentrations with those achieved during the previous study.

RESULTS

Mean ± SD CI of the ketamine and placebo treatments were 2.69 ± 0.65 and 2.57 ± 0.53 L/min/m2, respectively. No significant difference was found between the 2 treatments. Mean ketamine plasma concentration achieved prior to the NICO measurement was 1.37 ± 0.58 µg/mL, with no significant difference observed between the current and prior study.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Ketamine, at the dose administered, did not significantly increase the CI in sheep when determined by partial carbon dioxide rebreathing.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To determine the minimum alveolar concentration that blunts adrenergic responses (MACBAR) for isoflurane and evaluate effects of fentanyl on isoflurane MACBAR in sheep.

ANIMALS 13 healthy adult Dorset-cross adult ewes.

PROCEDURES In a crossover design, each ewe was anesthetized 2 times for determination of isoflurane MACBAR. Anesthesia was induced with propofol administered IV. Sheep initially received fentanyl (5 μg/kg, IV, followed by a constant rate infusion of 5 μg/kg/h) or an equivalent volume of saline (0.9% NaCl) solution (control treatment). After a washout period of at least 8 days, the other treatment was administered. For MACBAR determination, a mechanical nociceptive stimulus (ie, sponge forceps) was applied at the coronary band for 1 minute. The MACBAR values of the 2 treatments were compared by means of a paired t test. During MACBAR determination, blood samples were collected for measurement of plasma fentanyl concentration.

RESULTS Mean ± SD isoflurane MACBAR of the fentanyl and control treatments was 1.70 ± 0.28% and 1.79 ± 0.35%, respectively; no significant difference was found between the 2 treatments. Plasma concentration of fentanyl reached a median steady-state concentration of 1.69 ng/mL (interquartile range [25th to 75th percentile], 1.47 to 1.79 ng/mL), which was maintained throughout the study.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Administration of fentanyl at 5 μg/kg, IV, followed by a constant rate infusion of the drug at 5 μg/kg/h did not decrease isoflurane MACBAR. Further studies to determine the effect of higher doses of fentanyl on inhalation anesthetic agents and their potential adverse effects are warranted. (Am J Vet Res 2016;77:119–126)

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To compare analgesic and gastrointestinal effects of lidocaine and buprenorphine administered to rabbits undergoing ovariohysterectomy.

ANIMALS Fourteen 12-month-old female New Zealand White rabbits.

PROCEDURES Rabbits were assigned to 2 treatment groups (7 rabbits/group). One group received buprenorphine (0.06 mg/kg, IV, q 8 h for 2 days), and the other received lidocaine (continuous rate infusion [CRI] at 100 μg/kg/min for 2 days). Variables, including food and water consumption, fecal output, glucose and cortisol concentrations, and behaviors while in exercise pens, were recorded.

RESULTS Rabbits receiving a lidocaine CRI had significantly higher gastrointestinal motility, food intake, and fecal output and significantly lower glucose concentrations, compared with results for rabbits receiving buprenorphine. Rabbits receiving lidocaine also had a higher number of normal behaviors (eg, sprawling, traveling, and frolicking) after surgery, compared with behaviors such as crouching and sitting that were seen more commonly in rabbits receiving buprenorphine. Both groups had significant weight loss after surgery. Pain scores did not differ significantly between treatment groups. Significant decreases in heart rate and respiratory rate were observed on the day of surgery, compared with values before and after surgery. Rabbits in the lidocaine group had significantly overall lower heart rates than did rabbits in the buprenorphine group.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE A CRI of lidocaine to rabbits provided better postoperative outcomes with respect to fecal output, food intake, and glucose concentrations. Thus, lidocaine appeared to be a suitable alternative to buprenorphine for alleviating postoperative pain with minimal risk of anorexia and gastrointestinal ileus.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research