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Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To use a biopolymer delivery system to investigate the ability of interleukin (IL)-4 to recruit neutrophils into subcutaneous tissues of equids.

ANIMALS

16 horses and 2 ponies.

PROCEDURES

Animals were assigned to 3 experiments (6/experiment). Effects of recombinant equine (Req) IL-4 (100, 250, or 500 ng/site) versus a positive control (ReqIL-8; 100 ng, 250 ng, or 1 μg/site) and a negative control (Dulbecco PBSS or culture medium) on neutrophil chemotaxis were assessed after SC injection into the neck with an injectable biopolymer used as the vehicle. Tissue samples including the biopolymer plug were collected by biopsy at various time points from 3 hours to 7 days after injection. Neutrophil infiltration was evaluated by histologic scoring (experiments 1, 2, and 3) or flow cytometry (experiment 3).

RESULTS

Histologic neutrophil infiltration scores did not differ significantly among treatments at most evaluated time points. On flow cytometric analysis, log-transformed neutrophil counts in biopsy specimens were significantly greater for the ReqIL-8 treatment (1 μg/site) than the negative control treatment at 3 but not 6 hours after injection; results did not differ between ReqIL-4 and control treatments at either time point. Negative control treatments induced an inflammatory response in most equids in all experiments.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Flow cytometry was a more reliable method to estimate neutrophil migration than histologic score analysis. The ReqIL-4 treatment did not induce a detectable neutrophil response, compared with the negative control treatment in this study. Evidence of inflammation in negative control samples suggested the biopolymer is not a suitable vehicle for use in equids.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To compare the effects of tiludronate disodium and 3 other medical treatments on clinical and radiographic findings and biomarkers of disease progression in horses with osteoarthritis of the fetlock joint.

ANIMALS

100 Standardbred racehorses with spontaneous traumatic injury of the fet-lock joint.

PROCEDURES

Horses were retrospectively grouped by whether they received tiludronate IV or triamcinolone acetonide and hyaluronan, polysulfated glycosaminoglycan, or interleukin-1 receptor antagonist protein intra-articularly. Data were collected on clinical, radiographic, and ultrasonographic findings and results for serum and synovial samples obtained before and 6 months after treatment. Lameness score, joint flexion test response, radiographic score, serum concentrations of tumor necrosis factor-α and carboxy-terminal telopeptides of collagen types I and II (CTX-I and II, respectively), and synovial fluid concentrations of interleukin-1β, prostaglandin E2, and CTX-II were compared among treatments.

RESULTS

All treatments resulted in a significant improvement in lameness score and joint flexion test response at 6 months. In horses that received triamcino-lone acetonide and hyaluronan, synovial fluid interleukin-1β, prostaglandin E2, and CTX-II concentrations decreased after treatment, suggesting this treatment inhibited progression of hyaline cartilage degeneration and inflammatory processes. Horses that received tiludronate were the only group that had a decrease in radiographic score and serum CTX-I concentration after treatment, supporting the effect of tiludronate on bone metabolism. Tiludronate treatment was also followed by increases in serum and synovial fluid concentrations of CTX-II, a marker of cartilage damage.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Tiludronate appeared to inhibit the radiographic progression of osteoarthritis in high-motion joints of racehorses at 6 months after treatment by inhibiting subchondral bone remodeling. Whether this effect was associated with a worsening of progressive cartilage damage remains to be ascertained.

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association