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  • Author or Editor: Michael W. Russell x
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Abstract

Objective—To determine whether dogs with naturally occurring canine parvoviral (CPV) enteritis have laboratory evidence of hypercoagulability.

Design—Case-control study.

Animals—9 dogs with naturally occurring CPV enteritis and 9 age-matched control dogs.

Procedure—Blood was collected from all dogs within 24 hours of admission for thromboelastography (TEG) and determination of activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT), prothrombin time (PT), antithrombin III (AT) activity, and fibrinogen concentration. Fibrin-fibrinogen degradation product (FDP) concentration, Ddimer concentration, and platelet count were obtained in dogs with CPV enteritis only. Records were reviewed for evidence of thrombosis or phlebitis.

Results—All 9 dogs with CPV enteritis had evidence of hypercoagulability, determined on the basis of significantly increased TEG maximum amplitude and decreased AT activity. Fibrinogen concentration was significantly higher in dogs with CPV enteritis than in control dogs. The aPTT was moderately prolonged in dogs with CPV enteritis, and FDP concentration was < 5 mg/ml in 7 of 9 dogs. No dogs had a measurable D-dimer concentration. Platelet counts were within reference range. Four of 9 dogs had clinical evidence of venous thrombosis or phlebitis associated with catheters. One dog had multifocal splenic thrombosis identified at necropsy.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Dogs with CPV enteritis have a high prevalence of clinical thrombosis or phlebitis and laboratory evidence of hypercoagulability without disseminated intravascular coagulopathy. Thromboelastography may help identify hypercoagulable states in dogs. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2000;217:1500–1504)

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To compare histologic artifacts caused by carbon dioxide (CO2) or 810-nm diode surgical lasers used to obtain small biopsy specimens of skin from healthy dogs.

Design—Prospective study.

Animals—4 dogs.

Procedure—21 skin biopsy specimens were collected from each dog. Three biopsy specimens were obtained with a CO2 or an 810-nm diode laser at 3 operating settings each, and 3 biopsy specimens were obtained with a 6-mm biopsy punch instrument (controls). After processing, biopsy specimens were examined for artifacts related to laser-tissue interactions. Microscopically visible char was measured from the lateral edge of each specimen obtained with a laser.

Results—There were no significant differences among mean char distances in biopsy specimens obtained with the CO2 laser at various settings. Mean char distance was significantly greater in all skin biopsy specimens obtained with the diode laser, compared with those obtained with the CO2 laser. Mean char distance was significantly greater in biopsy specimens obtained with the 810-nm diode laser at high power, compared with biopsy specimens obtained with the 810-nm diode laser at low power.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results indicated that the CO2 laser caused less thermal injury at margins of skin biopsy specimens; therefore, if a surgical laser is used for removal of cutaneous masses or to obtain skin biopsy specimens, use of the CO2 laser is recommended. Veterinarians performing a biopsy by using a surgical laser should be aware that laser-induced artifacts may render small biopsy specimens useless for providing accurate histologic diagnosis. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2004;225:1562–1566)

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To determine whether hematologic and serum biochemical values for blood samples obtained from cats via vascular access ports (VAP) are comparable to those for samples obtained by direct venipuncture.

Design—Prospective study.

Animals—14 healthy cats.

Procedure—A VAP was surgically implanted in a jugular vein in each cat. Blood samples were obtained from the VAP and by direct venipuncture of the contralateral jugular vein 10 weeks after VAP placement. Results of hematologic and serum biochemical analyses were compared by use of a paired t-test. The P value to reject the null hypothesis was adjusted to account for multiple comparisons by using the Bonferroni procedure in which the nominal P-to-reject value is divided by the number of comparisons (0.05/24 = 0.002).

Results—Paired samples (VAP and venipuncture) obtained 10 weeks after VAP placement were evaluated for each cat. Of the 24 measured analytes, only potassium, total protein, and albumin concentrations differed significantly (P < 0.001 for all 3) between VAP and venipuncture samples.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggest that samples obtained from VAP are suitable for routine hematologic monitoring of feline cancer patients. Sample hemolysis may account for a slight increase in potassium, total protein, and albumin concentrations obtained from VAP samples. However, the values of variables most critical for monitoring of patients receiving chemotherapy (ie, mature neutrophil and platelet counts) are comparable. If proper techniques are used, VAP may be used for administration of chemotherapy as well as for blood collection in cats undergoing cancer treatment. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2002;220:482–485)

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To compare the effects of conventional and slanted ventral slot procedures on the biomechanical behavior of the C5-C6 vertebral motion unit (VMU) in dogs.

SAMPLE 14 vertebral columns (C4 through C7) from canine cadavers.

PROCEDURES Specimens were assigned to a conventional or slanted ventral slot group (n = 7/group). For each specimen, the C5-C6 VMU was tested in ventral and dorsal bending and positive and negative axial torsion before and after surgery. Range of motion (ROM), stiffness, and energy absorption were compared between the 2 groups.

RESULTS Both procedures significantly increased the ROM and stiffness and significantly decreased the energy absorption of the C5-C6 VMU in ventral and dorsal bending. Both procedures also increased the ROM in positive and negative axial torsion. In negative torsion, total stiffness and stiffness over the maximum ROM tested decreased less for the slanted slot procedure than for the conventional slot procedure. There were no significant differences between procedures for any of the other biomechanical outcomes examined.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results suggested that the biomechanical response of the C5-C6 VMU to the conventional and slanted ventral slot procedures was not significantly different, especially when considering postsurgical instability induced by both procedures. This was most likely due to disruption of the nucleus pulposus and dorsal annulus fibrosus of the disk with both procedures. On the basis of these findings, neither procedure appeared biomechanically superior. Comparative clinical studies are warranted to further evaluate the 2 procedures.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To describe oncologic outcomes following administration of a uniform stereotactic radiotherapy protocol (SRT; 10 Gy X 3) for canine intranasal tumors and to identify whether any clinical or dosimetric factors were predictive of event-free or overall survival time (EFST or OST).

ANIMALS

129 dogs.

PROCEDURES

In this single-institution retrospective study, the medical records database was searched for canine nonlymphomatous intranasal tumors treated with 10 Gy X 3 SRT between August 2013 and November 2020. Findings regarding adverse effects and outcomes were analyzed overall, for dogs grouped on the basis of life stage (mature adult, senior, or end of life), and for treatment-related or tumor-related variables to identify potential predictors of outcome.

RESULTS

After SRT, most dogs clinically improved with minimal acute radiotoxicity. The median EFST was 237 days; median OST was 542 days. Receipt of other tumor-directed therapies before or after SRT was associated with improved EFST in senior dogs (hazard ratio [HR], 0.416) and improved OST in mature adult (HR, 0.241) and senior dogs (HR, 0.348). In senior dogs, administration of higher near-minimum radiation doses was associated with improved EFST (HR, 0.686) and OST (HR, 0.743). In senior dogs, chondrosarcoma was associated with shorter OST (HR, 7.232), and in dogs at end of life, having a squamous cell or transitional carcinoma was associated with worse EFST (HR, 6.462).

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

This SRT protocol results in improved quality of life and prolonged OST for dogs of all life stages. Radiation protocol optimization or use of multimodal therapy may further improve outcomes.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Recent state and federal legislative actions and current recommendations from the World Health Organization seem to suggest that, when it comes to antimicrobial stewardship, use of antimicrobials for prevention, control, or treatment of disease can be ranked in order of appropriateness, which in turn has led, in some instances, to attempts to limit or specifically oppose the routine use of medically important antimicrobials for prevention of disease. In contrast, the AVMA Committee on Antimicrobials believes that attempts to evaluate the degree of antimicrobial stewardship on the basis of therapeutic intent are misguided and that use of antimicrobials for prevention, control, or treatment of disease may comply with the principles of antimicrobial stewardship. It is important that veterinarians and animal caretakers are clear about the reason they may be administering antimicrobials to animals in their care. Concise definitions of prevention, control, and treatment of individuals and populations are necessary to avoid confusion and to help veterinarians clearly communicate their intentions when prescribing or recommending antimicrobial use.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association