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Two adult male fox squirrels (Sciurus niger) from Kansas were observed with multiple areas of alopecia; 1 of the 2 animals was observed dragging its tail. The fox squirrels were euthanized by Kansas Department of Wildlife, Parks, and Tourism personnel and submitted to the Southeastern Cooperative Wildlife Disease Study in Athens, Georgia for diagnostic evaluation.

Gross Findings

Both fox squirrels (fox squirrels 1 and 2) had bilaterally symmetrical areas of alopecia in the axillary regions and along the dorsal midline (Figure 1). Multiple 0.5- to 1-mm-diameter pustules and a few small, superficial skin excoriations were

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
History

An adult great horned owl (Bubo virginianus) was found dead on a shooting preserve in Floyd County, Ga. There were no apparent traumatic injuries, but a mass on the right side of the bird's head was noticeable. The carcass was retrieved and frozen until the time of necropsy.

Clinical and Gross Findings

Initial necropsy revealed that the bird was a second-year female great horned owl in poor nutritional condition with reduced pectoral muscle mass. A featherless, soft, and freely movable pedunculated mass was attached to the dorsal aspect of the right external auditory orifice (Figure 1

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
History

An approximately 5-year-old free-ranging female white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) was harvested in Louisiana. The hunter reported that the deer was in poor body condition and had multiple nodular lesions present throughout the liver. Fresh samples of the liver, heart, lungs, spleen, and kidneys were obtained by a biologist from the Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries and submitted to the Southeastern Cooperative Wildlife Disease Study in Athens, Ga, for diagnostic evaluation.

Gross Findings

Throughout the examined section of liver, there were multifocal to coalescing, round (1- to 4-cm-diameter), raised, tan, nodular lesions that contained yellow purulent fluid.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate microtiter-plate format ELISAs constructed by use of different diagnostic targets derived from the Ehrlichia ewingii p28 outer membrane protein for detection of E ewingii antibodies in experimentally and naturally infected dogs.

Sample Population—Serum samples from 87 kenneled dogs, 9 dogs experimentally infected with anti-E ewingii, and 180 potentially naturally exposed dogs from Missouri.

Procedures—The capacities of the synthetic peptide and truncated recombinant protein to function as detection reagents in ELISAs were compared by use of PCR assay, western blot analysis, and a full-length recombinant protein ELISA. Diagnostic targets included an E ewingii synthetic peptide (EESP) and 2 recombinant proteins: a full-length E ewingii outer membrane protein (EEp28) and a truncated E ewingii outer membrane protein (EETp28)

Results—A subset of Ehrlichia canis-positive samples cross-reacted in the EEp28 ELISA; none were reactive in the EESP and EETp28 ELISAs. The EESP- and EETp28-based ELISAs detected E ewingii seroconversion at approximately the same time after infection as the EEp28 ELISAs. In afield population, each of the ELISAs identified the same 35 samples as reactive and 27 samples as nonreactive. Anaplasma and E can is peptides used in a commercially available ELISA platform did not detect anti-E ewingii antibodies in experimentally infected dogs.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—The EESP and EETp28 ELISAs were suitable for specifically detecting anti-E ewingii antibodies in experimentally and naturally infected dogs. [Am J Vet Res 2010;71:1195-1200)

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research