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  • Author or Editor: Michael J. Day x
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Abstract

Objective—To examine the difference in expression of messenger RNA (mRNA) transcripts for polymeric immunoglobulin receptor (pIgR), α-chain, and J-chain determined by use of quantitative real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (QRT-PCR) assays in duodenal biopsy specimens obtained from dogs with and without chronic diarrhea.

Sample Population—Biopsy specimens of the proximal portion of the duodenum were obtained endoscopically from 39 dogs evaluated because of chronic diarrhea (12 German Shepherd Dogs and 27 non-German Shepherd Dog breeds); specimens were also obtained from a control group of 7 dogs evaluated because of other gastrointestinal tract diseases and 2 dogs that were euthanatized as a result of nongastrointestinal tract disease.

Procedure—Dogs were anesthetized, and multiple mucosal biopsy specimens were obtained endoscopically at the level of the caudal duodenal flexure by use of biopsy forceps; in 2 control dogs, samples were obtained from the descending duodenum within 5 minutes of euthanasia. One-step QRT-PCR was used to quantify the level of expression of transcripts for the housekeeper gene glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, pIgR, α-chain, and J-chain in duodenal mucosal tissue.

Results—There was no significant difference in the level of expression of any transcript among non-German Shepherd Dog breeds without diarrhea (control group), non-German Shepherd Dog breeds with chronic diarrhea, and German Shepherd Dogs with chronic diarrhea.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results indicated that the susceptibility of German Shepherd Dogs to chronic diarrhea is not a result of simple failure of transcription of the key genes that encode molecules involved in mucosal IgA secretion. (Am J Vet Res 2005;66:11–16)

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To assess in pigs the pathogenicity and virulence of 3 strains of Salmonella spp capable of causing atypical salmonellosis in cattle.

Animals—36 Holstein calves and 72 pigs experimentally infected with Salmonella spp

Procedures—Representative Salmonella strains associated with 3 new disease phenotypes (protozoa-mediated hypervirulence, multisystemic cytopathicity, and encephalopathy) that have been characterized in cattle during the past 10 years were orally inoculated into pigs. Clinical manifestations were compared with those observed in cattle. Samples were collected from various tissues, and the presence of Salmonella organisms was assessed qualitatively and quantitatively by use of Salmonella-selective media

Results—Of the 3 unique Salmonella disease phenotypes observed in cattle, only protozoa-mediated hypervirulence was observed in pigs. Hypervirulence was related to a more rapid onset of disease and higher pathogen burden in pigs than in cattle. This phenotype was observed in pigs inoculated with multiresistant Salmonella enterica serotypes Typhimurium or Choleraesuis bearing the Salmonella genomic island 1 (SGI1) integron.

Conclusions and Clinical RelevanceSalmonella hypervirulence was identified in pigs noculated with SGI1-bearing strains exposed to free-living protozoa. Additionally, an SGI1-bearing strain of Salmonella Choleraesuis was detected that resulted in augmented virulence in pigs. Therefore, it appeared that protozoa-associated salmonellosis was analogous in pigs and cattle. Salmonella-mediated encephalopathy and multisystemic cytopathicity did not appear to be relevant diseases in pigs. (Am J Vet Res 2010;71:1170-1177)

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate fecal calprotectin concentrations in healthy dogs and dogs with chronic diarrhea, to identify cutoff values for fecal calprotectin concentrations for use in differentiating dogs with chronic diarrhea and a canine chronic enteropathy clinical activity index (CCECAI) < 12 from dogs with chronic diarrhea and a CCECAI ≥ 12, and to evaluate the association between histologic evidence of intestinal mucosal changes and fecal calprotectin concentrations in dogs with chronic diarrhea.

Sample—Fecal samples from 96 adult dogs (27 dogs with chronic diarrhea and 69 healthy control dogs).

Procedures—Severity of clinical signs was evaluated on the basis of the CCECAI scoring system. Endoscopy was performed in all dogs with chronic diarrhea, and mucosal biopsy specimens were evaluated histologically. Fecal calprotectin concentration was quantified via radioimmunoassay.

Results—Fecal calprotectin concentrations were significantly higher in dogs with chronic diarrhea than in healthy control dogs. Fecal calprotectin concentrations were also significantly higher in dogs with a CCECAI ≥ 12, compared with concentrations for dogs with a CCECAI between 4 and 11. Fecal calprotectin concentrations were significantly higher in dogs with chronic diarrhea associated with histologic lesions, compared with concentrations in control dogs, and were significantly correlated with the severity of histologic intestinal lesions. Among dogs with chronic diarrhea, the best cutoff fecal calprotectin concentration for predicting a CCECAI ≥ 12 was 48.9 μg/g (sensitivity, 53.3%; specificity, 91.7%).

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Fecal calprotectin may be a useful biomarker in dogs with chronic diarrhea, especially dogs with histologic lesions.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To determine the prevalence of perinuclear antineutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibodies (pANCA) in dogs with confirmed or suspected immune-mediated hemolytic anemia (IMHA) or dogs infected with various vector-borne pathogens, including Rickettsia rickettsii, Bartonella henselae, Bartonella vinsonii subsp berkhoffii, Ehrlichia canis, Borrelia burgdorferi, and Leishmania infantum.

Animals—55 dogs with confirmed or suspected IMHA, 140 dogs seroreactive for vector-borne pathogens, and 62 healthy dogs and dogs seronegative for vector-borne pathogens.

Procedures—Samples were allocated to subgroups on the basis of the health status of the dogs and the degree of seroreactivity against various vector-borne pathogens. Serum samples were tested retrospectively via indirect immunofluorescence assay to determine pANCA status.

Results—26 of 55 (47%) dogs with confirmed or suspected IMHA and 67 of 140 (48%) dogs seroreactive for vector-borne pathogens had positive results when tested for pANCA. Serum samples with the highest antibody concentrations against L infantum antigen had the highest proportion (28/43 [65%]) that were positive for pANCA. One of 20 (5%) dogs seronegative for tick-borne pathogens and 8 of 22 (36%) dogs seronegative for L infantum had positive results for pANCA. One of 20 (5%) healthy dogs had serum antibodies against pANCA.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—pANCA were detected in a high percentage of dogs with IMHA and vector-borne infectious diseases. Therefore, pANCA may be a relatively nonspecific marker for dogs with inflammatory bowel disease, although they could represent a biomarker for immune-mediated diseases and infections.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research