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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

CASE DESCRIPTION

A 3-year-old 31.1-kg castrated male mixed-breed dog was evaluated because of a 1- to 2-week history of paraparesis, knuckling of the hind feet, and difficulty posturing to urinate or defecate.

CLINICAL FINDINGS

The dog was paraparetic but weakly ambulatory with a kyphotic posture, a mildly decreased patellar reflex in the right pelvic limb, increased tone in both pelvic limbs, and marked hyperesthesia on paraspinal palpation of the lumbar region. The urinary bladder was enlarged and firm on palpation. Neuroanatomic findings were primarily consistent with localization to the T3-L3 spinal cord segments. Magenetic resonance imaging of the thoracolumbar spinal column revealed a discrete intramedullary spinal cord mass from the cranial aspect of L4 to the middle of L5. The mass was sampled by fine-needle aspiration, and on cytologic evaluation, the suspected diagnosis was an ependymoma.

TREATMENT AND OUTCOME

Owing to poor prognosis and limited treatment options, the owner elected euthanasia. Postmortem examination of the spinal cord and histologic findings for samples of the mass supported a likely diagnosis of ependymoma.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Ependymoma is a rare neoplasm in dogs but should be considered in young patients with evidence of a tumor in the CNS. Fine-needle aspiration of the spinal cord mass was possible in the dog of this report, and the cytologic findings provided useful diagnostic information.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To determine the diversity of Salmonella serotypes isolated from a large population of cull (market) dairy cows at slaughter.

Design—Cross-sectional study.

Sample PopulationSalmonella organisms isolated from the cecal-colon contents of 5,087 market dairy cows.

Procedure—During winter and summer 1996, cecalcolon contents of cull dairy cows at slaughter were obtained from 5 US slaughter establishments. Specimens were subjected to microbiologic culturing for Salmonella spp at 1 laboratory. Identified isolates were compared with Salmonella isolation lists published by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the National Veterinary Services Laboratory (NVSL) for approximately the same period. The Simpson diversity index was used to calculate the likelihood that Salmonella isolates selected randomly by establishment were different.

Results—Of 58 Salmonella serotypes identified, Salmonella ser. Montevideo was the most prevalent. Two of the top 10 CDC serotypes identified from humans in 1996, Salmonella ser. Typhimurium and S Montevideo, appeared on our top 10 list; 8 of the top 10 were found on NVSL listings. Thirty-one of 59 S Typhimurium isolates were identified as DT104 and found at a west slaughter establishment, 30 during the winter and 1 during the summer. The greatest diversity of serotypes was at a southeast establishment during the summer; the least diversity was at a central establishment in the winter.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—58 Salmonella serotypes were isolated from market dairy cows at slaughter and could pose a threat for food-borne illness. Salmonella Montevideo was the most frequently isolated serotype and may contribute substantially to salmonellosis in dairy cattle. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2001;219:1216–1220)

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To determine the prevalence of Salmonella spp in the cecal-colon contents of cull (market) dairy cows at slaughter because of potential public health ramifications.

Design—Survey study.

Sample Population—Cecal-colon contents collected from 5,087 cull (market) dairy cows at slaughter at 5 slaughter establishments across the United States.

Procedure—During 2 periods of the year, winter (January and February) and summer (July through September), 5 cull (market) cow slaughter establishments in the United States—west (WE), southeast (SEE), central (CE), north central (NCE), and south central (SCE)—establishments were visited, and cecalcolon contents of cull dairy cows were obtained at the time of slaughter. Samples were examined by microbiologic culture at a single laboratory for Salmonella spp.

ResultsSalmonella spp were detected in 23.1% of cecal-colon content samples from cull dairy cows across the 5 slaughter establishments. The highest site prevalence (54.5%) was detected at the WE during the summer period, whereas the lowest was found at the CE during the summer (4.3%) and at the NCE during the winter (4.5%). Considerable variation in the daily prevalence of Salmonella spp was found, particularly at the WE and the SCE. Salmonella spp were isolated from 93% of cecal-colon contents collected on a summer day at the WE.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results strongly suggest that there is a high prevalence of Salmonella spp in cull dairy cows at slaughter, which could burden Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point programs implemented in slaughter establishments. Procedures to reduce Salmonella load at the dairy farm and during transport to slaughter could reduce the risk of spread during the slaughter process. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2001;219:1212–1215)

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association