Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 8 of 8 items for

  • Author or Editor: Michael G. Hoelzler x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All Modify Search
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To compare malignancy rates of canine mammary gland tumors diagnosed incidentally and nonincidentally.

ANIMALS

96 female dogs from which mammary gland tumors were removed.

METHODS

Medical records of all female dogs from which mammary gland tumors were removed at a privately owned referral institution between 2018 and 2021 were reviewed. Data were obtained on signalment for each dog, histopathologic results for each tumor, and the primary reason for each dog’s presentation to the hospital. The proportion of malignant tumors was compared between dogs that were presented with nonincidental MGTs and dogs that were presented for a different primary condition and had incidental MGTs found on examination.

RESULTS

A total of 195 tumors were removed from the 96 dogs in this study. In dogs with incidental MGTs, 82 of 88 (93%) tumors were benign and 6 of 88 (7%) were malignant. In dogs with nonincidental MGTs, 75 of 107 (70%) tumors were benign and 32 of 107 (30%) were malignant. Nonincidental MGTs were significantly (OR, 5.83; 95% CI, 2.31 to 14.73; P = .001) more likely to be malignant compared with incidental MGTs. Dogs with nonincidental MGTs were 6.84 times as likely to have a malignant MGT removed compared with dogs with incidental MGTs (OR, 6.84; 95% CI, 2.47 to 18.94; P < .001). The likelihood of malignancy increased by 5% for each 1-kg increase in body weight (OR, 1.05; 95% CI, 1.01 to 1.09; P = .013). Larger tumors were more likely to be malignant than smaller tumors (P = .001).

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Most incidentally diagnosed MGTs are benign and allow for a good prognosis after excision. Small dogs and dogs with MGTs < 3 cm in diameter are the least likely to have a malignancy.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To determine whether cats undergoing ventral bulla osteotomy (VBO) for removal of inflammatory polyps or nasopharyngeal masses have altered ability to hear and whether polyp or mass removal affects auditory function as measured via air-conducted brainstem auditory evoked response (BAER).

Design—Prospective case series.

Animals—21 cats.

Procedures—Cats were sedated and had otic-oral examinations to confirm presence of nasopharyngeal masses; BAER testing was done immediately prior to and following the completion of a VBO and polyp or mass removal. Recheck examination, including otic examination and BAER in sedated cats, was performed when possible.

Results—17 cats met final inclusion criteria, and long-term follow-up was available for 15. Six of 17 had deafness as measured via air-conducted BAER prior to surgery. Mean followup time was 161 days, and there was no change from presurgical status in auditory ability in any cat. Eleven of 17 developed ipsilateral Horner syndrome in the immediate postoperative period, and 1 of 16 had polyp regrowth.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggested that in cats, VBO for removal of inflammatory polyps or masses is unlikely to affect hearing as measured via air-conducted BAER. Most cats developed short-term Horner syndrome. Cats with deafness prior to surgery did not regain auditory function. Ventral bulla osteotomy to remove nasopharyngeal polyps or masses provided no functional advantage with regard to restoration of hearing, compared with other surgical techniques. Polyp recurrence and long-term adverse effects were uncommon.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the incidence of and potential risk factors associated with development of postoperative infection-inflammation in a large number of dogs with rupture of the cranial cruciate ligament (CCL) that were treated via elective surgery.

Design—Retrospective case series.

Animals—808 dogs that underwent surgery (902 procedures) for rupture of the CCL.

Procedures—Medical records of dogs that underwent extracapsular lateral suture (ECLS) stabilization or tibial plateau leveling osteotomy (TPLO) between January 1, 2005, and December 31, 2006, were reviewed. Data regarding development of postoperative infection-inflammation were obtained. Potential risk factors were identified and recorded.

Results—496 ECLS surgeries were performed, and 406 TPLO surgeries were performed. Infection-inflammation developed in 55 of 902 (6.1%) surgeries within 6 months after surgery. There was a significant difference in infection-inflammation rate after the ECLS surgeries (21/496 [4.2%]), compared with rate after the TPLO surgeries (34/406 [8.4%]). Factors associated with a significantly lower rate of infection-inflammation included the use of suture material other than stainless-steel staples for skin closure and postoperative oral administration of antimicrobials.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—TPLO was associated with a significantly higher rate of infection-inflammation than the infection-inflammation rate after ECLS stabilization. The use of suture material other than staples for skin closure and postoperative oral administration of antimicrobials may be protective in minimizing infection-inflammation in dogs with rupture of the CCL that are treated via ECLS or TPLO.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To describe the surgical and postoperative complications encountered with tibial tuberosity advancement (TTA) performed in dogs with cranial cruciate ligament–deficient stifle joints.

Design—Retrospective case series.

Animals—458 dogs (TTA performed on 501 stifle joints).

Procedures—During the 2-year period, 624 TTA procedures had been performed in dogs for correction of cranial cruciate ligament deficiency. Five hundred one stifle joints in 458 dogs fit the criteria for inclusion; 43 dogs had had TTAs performed on both stifle joints. Historical data and complications reported were analyzed.

Results—Following 501 TTA surgeries, there were 95 instances of complications reported. In 7 stifle joints, 2 complications occurred. The most common complication was incisional infection and inflammation. Stifle joints with medial menisci that did not undergo medial meniscal release had a high incidence of subsequent injury, and meniscal tear was the most common complication treated by a second surgery. A partially torn cranial cruciate ligament left in situ at the time of TTA did not protect against subsequent injury of an intact, unreleased medial meniscus. Most fractures were identified on routine follow-up radiography and were rarely treated. In terms of preoperative factors, high body weight (> 40 kg [88 lb]) and a high preoperative patellar tendon angle were significantly associated with complications.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—High body weight and preoperative patellar tendon angle were significantly associated with complications following TTA in dogs. Subsequent meniscal tear was the most common reason for second surgery, suggesting that medial meniscal release of intact menisci should be considered when performing TTA in dogs.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association