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  • Author or Editor: Michael B. Lane x
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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

CASE DESCRIPTION A 6-year-old castrated male Boxer was evaluated for a 5-week history of frequent vomiting, melena, and signs of abdominal pain following accidental ingestion of 5 to ten 15-mg meloxicam tablets (approx ingested dose, 3.1 to 6.2 mg/kg [1.4 to 2.8 mg/lb]).

CLINICAL FINDINGS Clinical signs persisted despite 3 weeks of treatment with sucralfate (41.8 mg/kg [19 mg/lb], PO, q 8 h) and omeprazole (0.8 mg/kg [0.36 mg/lb], PO, q 24 h). Results of a CBC and serum biochemical analysis were unremarkable. Abdominal ultrasonography revealed peptic ulceration, and esophagogastroduodenoscopy confirmed the presence of severe proximal duodenal ulceration.

TREATMENT AND OUTCOME A radiotelemetric pH-monitoring capsule was placed in the gastric fundus under endoscopic guidance for continuous at-home monitoring of intragastric pH and response to treatment. Treatment was continued with sucralfate (as previously prescribed) and omeprazole at an increased administration frequency (0.8 mg/kg, PO, q 12 h). Intragastric pH was consistently ≥ 3.0 for > 75% of the day during treatment, with the exception of 1 day when a single dose of omeprazole was inadvertently missed. Ulceration and clinical signs completely resolved.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE Continuous radiotelemetric monitoring of intragastric pH in the dog of this report was useful for confirming that treatment achieved a predetermined target pH and for demonstrating the impact of missed doses. Duodenal ulceration resolved with twice-daily but not once-daily omeprazole administration. Findings suggested that twice-daily administration of omeprazole may be necessary to achieve this target pH and that a pH ≥ 3.0 for 75% of the day may promote healing of peptic ulcers in dogs.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To investigate the precision of an ELISA for measurement of serum cortisol concentration (SCC) in dogs, assess agreement between this ELISA and 2 validated chemiluminescence assays (CLAs), and evaluate the clinical implications of any bias associated with this ELISA when measuring SCC in dogs.

DESIGN Evaluation study.

SAMPLE 75 stored, frozen serum samples from client-owned dogs.

PROCEDURES Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay precision was evaluated by measuring SCC of pooled serum samples. Agreement with standard methods was evaluated with Spearman rank correlation, Passing-Bablok regression, and Bland-Altman analysis to compare SCCs obtained with the ELISA and the 2 CLAs. An error grid was used to evaluate identified bias.

RESULTS Within-laboratory coefficients of variation for pooled serum samples with low, medium, and high SCCs were 21.4%, 28.9%, and 13.0%, respectively. There was a high correlation between ELISA results (for all samples combined) and results of the 2 CLAs (CLA 1, r = 0.96; CLA 2, r = 0.97), but constant and proportional biases between the ELISA and CLAs were present at all concentrations. Clinically important disagreement between ELISA results and CLA results occurred in 16 of 63 (25%) samples, particularly with low and high SCCs.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results suggested that the rate of clinical disagreement between the ELISA and CLAs was sufficiently high to recommend that equivocal results obtained with the ELISA be confirmed by a reference laboratory. Further evaluation of analytic performance of the ELISA should focus on samples with very high and very low SCCs.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association