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  • Author or Editor: Maxey L. Wellman x
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Abstract

OBJECTIVE To assess efficiency of gravity filtration to enhance recovery of equine bone marrow elements including stem and progenitor cells.

ANIMALS 12 healthy adult horses.

PROCEDURES Bone marrow aspirates were collected from the fifth sternebral body and filtered by gravitational flow to obtain bone marrow elements. Raw and harvested bone marrow and marrow effluent were evaluated for WBC and platelet counts, automated and cytomorphologic cell differential counts, mesenchymal stem cell CFUs, cell viability, and differentiation capacity. Isolated cells were analyzed for CD90 and major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I and II antigens.

RESULTS Mean cell viability of harvested bone marrow was 95.9%. Total WBCs and platelets were efficiently captured on the filter (> 95%), and mean recovery in harvested bone marrow was 30%. Cytologic cell differential counts indicated that the percentage of neutrophils was significantly less and the progenitor cell population was significantly higher and concentrated 1.56-fold in harvested bone marrow, compared with results for raw bone marrow. Flow cytometry and cell culture were used to characterize harvested bone marrow cells as positive for expression of CD90 and negative for MHCI and MHCII, which indicated stem cells with a multipotent phenotype that differentiated into chondrocytes, osteocytes, adipocytes, and tenocytes.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Gravitational filtration of bone marrow efficiently yielded platelets and cells and produced a progenitor-enriched, leukocyte-reduced product, compared with raw bone marrow.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To determine the efficiency of a novel point-of-care gravitational marrow separator and bone marrow aspiration needle for concentrated bone marrow production and bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) separation and assess the effect of repeated bone marrow collections in horses.

Animals—8 healthy adult horses.

Procedures—Bone marrow aspiration was performed twice (1 month apart) from sternebral bodies with a standard or prototype multidirectional needle. Concentrated bone marrow was obtained by gravitational marrow separation and evaluated for WBC and platelet counts, automated and cytomorphologic cell differential counts, MSCs, and cell viability.

Results—Concentrated bone marrow samples obtained with the marrow separator had 5- to 19-fold bone marrow-derived MSC, WBC, and platelet counts, compared with original bone marrow samples. Use of a multidirectional needle increased the frequency of obtaining MSC-richer concentrated bone marrow. Repeating bone marrow aspiration at 1 month yielded greater MSC numbers but slightly lower cell viability after processing.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—The gravitational bone marrow separator and multidirectional needle were used to effectively harvest bone marrow and improve the quality of concentrated bone marrow. Comparable, or even greater, numbers of bone marrow-derived MSCs were collected by repeated bone marrow aspiration after a 1-month interval from the same aspiration sites. Use of the marrow separator and multidirectional bone marrow aspiration needle can facilitate a 1-step, point-of-care, nonlaboratory method to obtain concentrated bone marrow as a mixture of bone marrow-derived MSCs and growth factors from platelets and plasma.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To assess the discriminatory value for corticosteroid-induced alkaline phosphatase (CiALP) activity and other variables that can be measured routinely on a CBC and biochemical analysis for the diagnosis of hypoadrenocorticism in dogs.

SAMPLE Medical records of 57 dogs with confirmed hypoadrenocorticism and 57 control dogs in which hypoadrenocorticism was suspected but ruled out.

PROCEDURES A retrospective case-control study was conducted. Dogs were included if a CBC and complete biochemical analysis had been performed. Dogs with iatrogenic hypoadrenocorticism and dogs treated previously with glucocorticoids were excluded. Cortisol concentration for dogs with hypoadrenocorticism was ≤ 2 μg/dL both before and after ACTH administration. Cortisol concentration for control dogs was > 4 μg/dL before or after ACTH administration.

RESULTS Area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve for CiALP activity was low (0.646; 95% confidence interval, 0.494 to 0.798). Area under the ROC curve for a model that combined the CiALP activity, Na-to-K ratio, eosinophil count, activity of creatine kinase, and concentrations of SUN and albumin was high (0.994; 95% confidence interval, 0.982 to 1.000). Results for this model could be used to correctly classify all dogs, except for 1 dog with hypoadrenocorticism and no electrolyte abnormalities.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE CiALP activity alone cannot be used as a reliable diagnostic test for hypoadrenocorticism in dogs. Combined results for CiALP activity, Na-to-K ratio, eosinophil count, creatine kinase activity, and concentrations of SUN and albumin provided an excellent means to discriminate between hypoadrenocorticism and diseases that mimic hypoadrenocorticism.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

In collaboration with the American College of Veterinary Pathologists

Open access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

In collaboration with the American College of Veterinary Pathologists

Open access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate intra-articular autologous protein solution (APS) for the treatment of osteoarthritis in horses.

Animals—40 client-owned horses with naturally occuring osteoarthritis.

Procedures—APS was generated from a dual-device system that concentrated plasma and WBC proteins and enriched platelet growth factors. Horses were randomly assigned to receive an intra-articular injection of 5 mL of saline (0.9% NaCl) solution (n = 20) or APS (20), exercised on a treadmill, and evaluated on the basis of lameness grades, kinetic gait analysis, joint circumference, and range of motion for 14 days. Horses that received saline solution were administered APS at termination of the study, and clients scored horses for lameness and discomfort before, 12 weeks after, and 52 weeks after the APS injection.

Results—The APS group had significant improvements in lameness grade, asymmetry indices of vertical peak force, and range of joint motion by 14 days, compared with baseline or control group values. No adverse effects associated with APS treatment were evident. Clients assessed lameness and comfort as improved at 12 and 52 weeks. The APS had greater likelihood (OR, 4.3 to 30.0) of a therapeutic response in horses with a lameness score < 4, < 10% vertical force asymmetry, or absence of marked osteophyte formation, subchondral sclerosis, or joint space narrowing. Concentration of interleukin-1 receptor antagonist in APS was 5.8 times that in blood.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Intra-articular administration of APS can be considered an effective treatment option for equine osteoarthritis, with the potential for disease-modifying effects.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research