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  • Author or Editor: Mary R. Telle x
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Abstract

OBJECTIVE

Although research on animal hoarding, both in urban and rural settings, is growing, a gap remains in the literature about community patterns of animal ownership. Our objective was to determine patterns of companion animal ownership in a rural setting and the association between number of animals in a household and indicators of animal health.

SAMPLE

Retrospective review of veterinary medical records from 2009 to 2019 from a university-based community clinic in Mississippi.

PROCEDURES

Review of all owners who reported having animals from a household with 8 or more other animals on average, excluding animals from shelters, rescues, or veterinary practices. Across the study period, 28,446 unique encounters occurred among 8,331 unique animals and 6,440 unique owners. Indicators of care for canine and feline animals were taken from values indicated on the physical examination.

RESULTS

Animals were largely from single-animal households (46.9%) or households with 2 to 3 animals (35.9%). However, 2.1% of all animal cases reviewed lived in a household reported to have 8 or more animals, and 2.4% of canines and 4.3% of felines lived in a household with 8 or more animals. Increased animal ownership in the home correlated with worse health outcomes based on the health-care indicators investigated in canines and felines.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Veterinarians working in community settings are likely to encounter cases of animal hoarding and should consider collaborating with mental health practitioners if repeated incidences of negative health-care indicators occur for animals from the same household.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To retrospectively evaluate the complication rate following dorsal placement of a commercially available 1-hole subpalpebral lavage system (SPL) at a veterinary teaching hospital.

ANIMALS

102 client-owned horses with ophthalmic disease.

PROCEDURES

Medical records of horses (2010 to 2020) with ophthalmic disease were reviewed to determine whether a commercially available SPL system was dorsally placed. Data collected from the medical record included signalment, presenting complaint(s), diagnosis, ophthalmic procedures performed, SPL laterality, hospital service that placed the SPL, anesthetic technique for placement (general anesthesia or sedation with local nerve blocks), duration of SPL management while hospitalized or at home, type of enclosure for the horse, use of eye protection, duration of time the SPL was in place, location of SPL management (home vs hospital), types and numbers of medications administered, recorded complications, and outcome of the globe. Complications experienced during treatment were categorized as either ocular or nonocular. The χ2 test for independence test and Fisher exact test were performed to examine the relationship between the department that placed the SPL, method of anesthesia, antimicrobial administration, type of facial protection used, and complication type and rate.

RESULTS

Overall complication rate for SPL systems was 29.1% (37/127), with 21.2% (27/127) being ocular complications and 7.9% (10/127) being nonocular complications. SPL complication rate was not affected by any variable that was examined.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Commercially available SPL systems placed dorsally have a low ocular complication rate. These SPL systems may be placed by veterinarians with varied training backgrounds and managed at home without significantly increasing complication rate.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To characterize the clinical course and long-term prognosis of a suspected novel cause of neurogenic keratoconjunctivitis sicca (nKCS) secondary to florfenicol, terbinafine hydrochloride, mometasone furoate (Claro and Neptra) or florfenicol, terbinafine, betamethasone acetate (Osurnia).

ANIMALS

29 client-owned dogs.

PROCEDURES

Online survey and word-of-mouth recruitment were conducted to identify dogs that developed clinical signs of nKCS after application of otitis externa medication containing terbinafine and florfenicol. A retrospective analysis of medical records of dogs meeting inclusion criteria was then conducted. Included dogs had onset of clinical signs of nKCS within 1 day after application of otitis externa medications containing terbinafine and florfenicol and had documentation of low Schirmer tear test value (< 15 mm/min) of affected eyes.

RESULTS

29 dogs with medical records available for review met the inclusion criteria. Documented return of clinically normal tear production was identified in 24 of 29 dogs, with a median time from application of ear medication to documented return of clinically normal tear production of 86 days (range, 19 to 482 days). A corneal ulcer was diagnosed in 68% (20/29). Multivariable Cox regression analysis showed being referred to an ophthalmologist (P = .03) and having a deep ulcer (P = .02) were associated with a longer time to documentation of Schirmer tear test ≥ 15 mm/min.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Dogs that developed nKCS within 1 day after application of otitis externa medications containing terbinafine and florfenicol had a good prognosis for return of normal tear production within 1 year.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association