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History

A 7-year-old 22-kg (48.4-lb) castrated male mixed-breed dog was evaluated at a university veterinary health center because of a 4-week history of anorexia, tachypnea at rest, and large-bowel diarrhea.

Clinical and Clinicopathologic Findings

On physical examination, the dog was in poor condition with a body condition score of 3/9. Mucous membranes were pale. The dog was mildly tachycardic with a heart rate of 140 beats/min; femoral pulses were strong and synchronous with the heartbeat. Thoracic auscultation revealed no abnormal lung sounds and a resting respiratory rate of 28 breaths/min.

Clinicopathologic analyses revealed microcytic, hypochromic, marked (PCV, 14%; reference interval,

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Case Description—An approximately 5-year-old sexually intact male alpaca was evaluated because of a right-sided maxillary mass that had recurred after previous surgical debulking.

Clinical Findings—Clinical, radiographic, and CT examination revealed an approximately 1.5-cm-diameter soft tissue mass associated with expansile osteolysis of the maxillary alveolar bone, beginning at the level of the right maxillary third premolar tooth extending caudally to the level of the rostral roots of the second molar tooth.

Treatment and Outcome—Right partial maxillectomy was performed, and histologic examination revealed an incompletely excised fibrosarcoma with osseous metaplasia. External beam radiation therapy to the tumor bed was initiated 1 month after surgery. Computerized planning was performed, and a total radiation dose of 48 Gy was prescribed in eleven 4.4-Gy fractions. Follow-up CT evaluations 6 and 58 weeks after radiation therapy was completed revealed no evidence of tumor recurrence. No clinical evidence of tumor recurrence was detected through 110 weeks after radiation therapy.

Clinical Relevance—The oral fibrosarcoma in the alpaca described here was successfully treated with surgical excision and adjuvant radiation therapy, resulting in excellent quality of life of the treated animal.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To determine the association between cancer chemotherapy and serum canine distemper virus (CDV), canine parvovirus (CPV), and rabies virus antibody titers in tumor-bearing dogs.

Design—Prospective study.

Animals—21 client-owned dogs with various malignancies and 16 client-owned dogs with lymphoma.

Procedure—In study A, serum antibody titers were measured by use of hemagglutination inhibition (CPV titers) or serum neutralization (CDV titers) before and at least 1 month after initiation of chemotherapy. Baseline values were compared with values obtained from a control population of 122 healthy dogs seen for routine revaccination. Titers were considered protective at ≥ 1:96 for CDV and ≥ 1:80 for CPV.

In study B, serum IgG titers were measured by use of immunofluorescent assay (CDV and CPV titers) and rapid fluorescent focus inhibition test (RFFIT, rabies titers) at baseline and again at weeks 5, 8, and 24 of a standard chemotherapy protocol for treatment of lymphoma. An IgG titer of ≥ 1:50 was considered protective for CPV and CDV. An RFFIT titer of ≥ 0.5 U/ml was considered protective for rabies virus.

Results—Significant changes were not detected in CDV, CPV, and rabies virus titers following chemotherapy in tumor-bearing dogs.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggest that established immunity to CDV, CPV, and rabies virus from previous vaccination is not significantly compromised by standard chemotherapy used to treat tumor-bearing dogs. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2001;219:1238–1241)

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate safety and efficacy of LDI-100, a preparation containing human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) and bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG), in the treatment of dogs with mast cell tumors and to compare results with those from a control group receiving single-agent vinblastine.

Animals—95 dogs with measurable grade II or III mast cell tumors.

Procedures—Dogs were randomized to receive either LDI-100 (1.35 ng of BCG and 2 units of hCG, SC, q 24 h) or vinblastine (2 mg/m2, IV, q 1 wk) for 6 weeks. Tumors were measured at baseline and day 42, and dogs were monitored for signs of toxicosis. Clinical performance scores were recorded at each visit. Differences in host factors (sex, weight, and age), clinical performance score, tumor response, and adverse events were analyzed.

Results—46 dogs received LDI-100, and 49 dogs received vinblastine. No significant differences were found between the 2 treatment groups with regard to host factors or clinical performance score. Tumor response (≥50% reduction) rates were similar between the LDI-100 and vinblastine group (28.6% and 11.7%, respectively). Dogs in the LDI-100 group had significantly less neutropenia than the vinblastine group.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—hCG and BCG have immunomodulatory and antitumor effects against a variety of malignancies in humans and dogs. In this study, LDI-100 provided clinical responses comparable to single-agent vinblastine chemotherapy but without myelosuppression. LDI-100 is a promising new agent that should be further investigated for multimodality therapy of mast cell tumors in dogs.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the veterinary version of the bladder tumor antigen (V-BTA) test as a screening test for transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) of the lower urinary tract of dogs.

Animals—229 client-owned dogs.

Procedure—Urine samples from dogs were shipped overnight to a single laboratory to facilitate testing within 48 hours of collection by use of the V-BTA rapid latex agglutination urine dipstick test. Groups of dogs included the following: 1) dogs with TCC of the lower urinary tract, 2) healthy control dogs, 3) unhealthy control dogs with non-TCC urinary tract disease, and 4) unhealthy control dogs without urinary tract disease. Test sensitivity and specificity were calculated by use of standard methods. Logistic models were developed to assess the effect of disease status, test conditions, urine composition, and signalment on the performance of the V-BTA test.

Results—A total of 229 urine samples were analyzed, including 48 from dogs with suspected (n = 3) or confirmed (45) TCC. Test sensitivities were 88, 87, and 85% for all dogs with (suspected and confirmed) TCC, dogs with confirmed TCC at any site, and dogs with confirmed TCC of the urinary bladder, respectively. Test specificities were 84, 41, and 86% for healthy control dogs, unhealthy control dogs with non-TCC urinary tract disease, and unhealthy control dogs without urinary tract disease, respectively. The test performed slightly better on centrifuged urine samples than on uncentrifuged urine samples.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Our results indicate that the V-BTA test is useful in screening for urinary tract TCC in dogs. (Am J Vet Res 2003;64:1017–1020)

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research