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Summary

A computer-based search was conducted of medical and necropsy records of horses admitted to the teaching hospital from Jan 1, 1979, to Dec 31, 1987, to obtain the records of all horses admitted to the hospital for colic and subsequently found to have gastric rupture. Fifty cases of gastric rupture were found. The records were reviewed to obtain data regarding peritoneal fluid analysis. Cell counts of these samples were often erroneous because debris and clumps of bacteria were counted when most WBC were lysed.

A cross-sectional study of gastric rupture cases versus all other colic cases regarding season of admission revealed that there was no association between season and the occurrence of gastric rupture. There was also no increased risk associated with age, gender, breed, and the occurrence of gastric rupture.

One hundred colic cases, matched with the gastric rupture cases by year of admission, were randomly selected via a table of random numbers. A questionnaire regarding age, breed, gender, use of the horse, housing, diet, water source, deworming schedule, and medical history was completed from the medical records and phone conversations with the horse owners. The results indicated that horses on a diet of grass hay or grass/alfalfa hay only or those that drank water from a bucket, stream, or pond were at increased risk for having gastric rupture. In contrast, horses fed grain had a reduced risk.

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Summary

Seven horses with metallic foreign bodies in the mouth or pharynx were examined at the Colorado State University Veterinary Teaching Hospital from 1983 to 1989. The horses had variable clinical signs, such as purulent nasal discharge, swelling of the throatlatch area, and dyspnea. Most of the horses had clinical signs for more than 2 weeks, and had no or only temporary improvement with conservative medical treatment (antibiotics, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs). The definitive diagnostic test in all of the cases was radiography, which also aided in the plan for surgical removal of the foreign body. Once the foreign body was removed from each of the horses, their clinical signs resolved. Most of the foreign bodies were small pieces of wire, the sources of which could not be determined, but that may have been incorporated in baled hay.

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association