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Summary

Fifty dogs underwent intradermal allergy testing with housedust mite and house dust extracts, using concentrations recommended by the manufacturer. Twelve dogs (group I) were healthy dogs obtained from a pound; 12 dogs (group II) were healthy, privately owned dogs; 15 dogs (group III) were suspected of being atopic and had had multiple positive reactions to intradermal injections of allergens of specific trees, weeds, grasses, or molds; and 11 dogs (group IV) were suspected of being atopic, but only had had positive reactions to intradermal injections of housedust mite, house dust, and flea antigen extracts. Use of the concentrations of housedust mite and house dust extracts currently recommended for intradermal allergy testing resulted in false-positive reactions in 14 of 24 (58%) and 12 of 24 (50%) healthy dogs tested, respectively. Differences in number of dogs with positive reactions or grade of reaction to housedust mite or house dust allergens were not detected between groups of healthy dogs (groups I vs II), between groups of suspected atopic dogs (groups III vs IV), or between healthy dogs and dogs suspected of being atopic (groups I and II vs III and IV). Therefore, clinical importance of positive results of intradermal allergy testing of house dust or housedust mite allergens was equivocal for dogs suspected of being atopic.

Threshold concentrations for intradermal allergy testing were determined in 24 healthy dogs (group I and II) by intradermal administration of 5 dilutions each of housedust mite extract and house dust extract. Positive test results to various concentrations of housedust mite extract were observed in 22 dogs at 1:1,000 wiv, 14 dogs at 1:5,000 wiv, 5 dogs at 1:10,000 ww, 4 dogs at 1:25,000 wv, and 1 dog at 1:50,000 ww. Positive test results to various concentrations of house dust extract were observed in 21 dogs at 500 protein nitrogen units (pnu)/ml, 12 dogs at 100 pnu/ml, and 3 dogs at 50 pnu/ml, but none of the dogs had positive results at 20 and 10 pnu/ml, respectively.

Threshold concentrations for housedust mite (1:50,000 w/v) and house dust (20 pnu/ml) extracts were subsequently used for intradermal allergy testing of 9 dogs (group V) that were considered to be atopic and that had had multiple positive test results after intradermal injection of specific allergens. Positive reactions to intradermal injections of threshold concentrations of housedust mite and house dust extracts were observed in 6 of 9 and 7 of 9 atopic dogs, respectively. Analysis of the results was suggestive that house dust and housedust mite extracts can be properly diluted to threshold concentrations for intradermal allergy testing without adversely affecting their diagnostic value. Lower concentrations of housedust mite and house dust extracts than are currently recommended should be used for intradermal allergy testing to avoid false-positive results.

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective

To determine and compare biochemical reference intervals for sunshine bass (hybrid striped bass) from 3 culture systems.

Design

Observational comparison study.

Animals

Clinically normal sunshine bass (reciprocal hybrid striped bass, female Morone chrysops × male M saxatilis) raised in high-density recirculating systems (80 g/L), low-density tanks (5 g/L) with biofilters, and cages (70 g/L) in a fresh water pond.

Procedure

Biochemical reference intervals were determined for fish from the different production systems following the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards guidelines. Reference intervals from the 3 groups were compared.

Results

Reference intervals were significantly different between sunshine bass in the various culture systems. Though most of the differences in reference intervals were minor, fish in the high-density recirculating system had higher concentrations of total protein, albumin, globulin, creatinine, and phosphorus, and lower chloride values. There were no significant differences in glucose concentrations among the 3 groups of fish, and no differences in cortisol concentrations between fish in tanks and cages.

Conclusions

Separate reference intervals should be developed for hybrid striped bass in different culture systems.

Clinical Relevance

Determining biochemical reference intervals for hybrid striped bass provides a tool to assess the health status of these fish. (Am J Vet Res 1996; 57:624–627)

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective

To determine and compare hematologic reference intervals for hybrid striped bass from different culture systems and for 2 types of hybrid.

Design

Observational comparison study.

Animals

Clinically normal sunshine bass (reciprocal hybrid striped bass, female Morone chrysops × male M saxatilis) raised in high-density recirculating systems, sunshine bass raised in tanks with biofilters, and palmetto bass (original hybrid striped bass, female M saxatilis × male M chrysops) raised in tanks with biofilters.

Procedure

Hematologic reference intervals were determined for fish from the different production systems, following the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards guidelines. Reference intervals from the 3 groups were compared.

Results

Reference intervals were significantly different between sunshine bass in the 2 culture systems and between sunshine and palmetto bass. Many of the differences were slight, but notable differences were observed. Sunshine bass in recirculating systems had higher total leukocyte, lymphocyte, neutrophil, and monocyte counts than did either hybrid in tanks. Palmetto bass had a greater number of neutrophils than monocytes, whereas sunshine bass had more monocytes than neutrophils. Additionally, palmetto bass had a lower PCV and hemoglobin value than did either group of sunshine bass.

Conclusions

Separate reference intervals should be developed for hybrid striped bass in different culture systems and for different types of hybrids.

Clinical Relevance

Determining reference intervals for hybrid striped bass provides a tool to assess the health status of these fish. (Am J Vet Res 1996; 57:618–623)

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research