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  • Author or Editor: Mark R. Crabill x
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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

SUMMARY

The bicipital tendons and bursae of 25 healthy adult Quarter Horses were ultrasonographically examined. Cross-sectional images of the right and left bicipital tendons were obtained from each horse, using a 7.5-MHz transducer held in the frontal plane at the point of the shoulder. The bicipital tendon at the point of the shoulder appeared as a bilobate structure overlying the echogenic surface of the humerus. Median distance from the skin surface to the cranial surface of the tendon on the medial sagittal plane of the tendon was 23 mm (range, 16.5 to 30 mm); median distance on the lateral sagittal plane was 14 mm (range, 8.5 to 19 mm). Median distance from the skin surface to the tendon on the midsagittal plane of the tendon was 17 mm (range, 10.5 to 22 mm). Median cranial-to-caudal widths of the lateral and medial lobes of the tendon at their greatest dimensions were 20.5 mm (range, 18 to 27.5 mm) and 16 mm (range, 13 to 20.5 mm), respectively. The median cranial-to-caudal width of the central (midsagittal) portion of the tendon was 10 mm (range, 7 to 13.5 mm). The bicipital bursa was ≤ 3 mm wide at all locations at which it was measured. Ultrasonographic imaging was easily performed and allowed evaluation of the bicipital tendon, bursa, and surface of the underlying humerus.

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Summary

Medical records of 10 horses with olecranon bursitis were reviewed to examine treatments, evaluate a technique for en bloc resection of the bursa in standing horses, and determine outcome of the horses after treatment. Before admission, 6 horses had been treated by needle aspiration of fluid from the mass, followed by injection of corticosteroids. Subsequent treatment for 2 of these 6 horses included open drainage and packing of the cavity with gauze soaked in 7% iodine solution. None resolved after these treatments.

After admission to the hospital, 5 horses were treated medically and 5 were treated by en bloc resection of the bursa. One horse that had received intralesional injection of a radionuclide was lost to follow-up evaluation. One horse treated conservatively by open drainage and packing and 1 treated by injection of a radionuclide had resolution of the olecranon bursitis. Only 1 of these 2 horses had a cosmetic result. The acquired bursae decreased in size in 2 horses (1 treated with a corticosteroid and 1 with orgotein), but were still visible 7 and 46 months after treatment, respectively.

The surgery site of 4 horses that were treated by en bloc resection healed by primary intention, and the owners of these horses were pleased with the cosmetic results. The suture line of 1 horse dehisced 5 days after surgery. Proliferative granulation tissue was removed on 2 occasions, and the site healed by second intention after 2 months. A small knot and some white hair remained at the surgery site.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Summary

A review of medical records was used to identify 10 horses in which stringhalt developed subsequent to trauma to the dorsal metatarsus. Six horses developed stringhalt within 3 months after injury, 3 horses developed stringhalt > 3 months after injury, and time from injury to stringhalt was unknown for 1 horse. Horses were treated with exercise, including daily hand-walking with pasture turnout, followed by lunging; or surgically, using lateral digital extensor myotenectomy. Of the horses treated with exercise, 1 had resolution of stringhalt, 2 improved but had residual stringhalt, and 1 had no change. Two of the horses having lateral digital extensor myotenectomy had resolution of stringhalt. Two of the remaining 3 horses treated surgically had varying degrees of improvement, and in 1 horse there was no change. Stringhalt is a potential complication following trauma to the dorsal metatarsal region. Potential causes include tendon adhesions enhancing tarsocrural joint flexion or abnormalities in the myotatic reflex caused by tendon injury that result in abnormal flexion of the tarsocrural joint.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Objective—

To determine the technique used, and the outcome for, double-plate fixation of comminuted fractures of the second phalanx of horses

Design—

Retrospective analysis of medical records.

Animals—

l0 horses with comminuted fractures of the second phalanx that were treated by use of double-plate fixation.

Procedure—

Two 4- to 6-hole dynamic compression plates were abaxially placed to achieve arthrodesis of the proximal interphalangeal joint and fixation of the fracture of the second phalanx.

Results—

Arthrodesis and fracture healing were detected in all horses.

Clinical Implications—

Horses with comminuted fractures of the second phalanx that are treated with double-plate fixation have an excellent prognosis for survival and use as broodstock, and have an increased potential for return to useful function.

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association