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Abstract

Objective—To determine whether blood lactate values determined in dogs with 4 commercially available point-of-care meters were in agreement with values determined with a critical care laboratory blood analyzer.

Design—Prospective study.

Animals—50 dogs evaluated for emergency treatment.

Procedures—Blood samples were collected at initial evaluation and processed on 4 point-of-care meters and on a critical care laboratory blood analyzer.

Results—All 4 point-of-care lactate meters generated measurements that were in agreement with the hospital's critical care analyzer. Values for agreement (bias) between the 4 point-of-care meters and the critical care analyzer were −0.652 (limits of agreement [LA], −1.958 to 0.654]), −0.670 (LA, −2.110 to 0.769), −0.096 (LA, −2.071 to 1.879), and −0.498 (LA, −2.616 to 1.620), respectively.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Despite its prognostic and therapeutic relevance, blood lactate measurement in dogs has been hampered by the inability to perform the test in a timely fashion. Results of the present study indicated that several handheld point-of-care lactate meters provided results that were in agreement with a laboratory critical care blood analyzer.

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To determine whether there are increased concentrations of 25-hydroxyvitaminn D3 in red-eared slider turtles (Trachemys scripta elegans) after exposure to UV radiation.

Animals—12 yearling turtles recently removed from aestivation.

Procedures—Turtles were randomly allocated to 2 groups (6 turtles/group). An initial blood sample was collected from all turtles for measurement of 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 concentrations. Turtles of 1 group were then provided no supplemental lighting, whereas turtles of the other group were exposed to full-spectrum coil bulbs at a distance of 22.86 cm. The UV-A and UV-B radiation generated by the supplemental lighting was measured by use of a radiometer-photometer at weekly intervals. Measurements were collected 2.54 and 22.86 cm from the bulb surface. The study was continued for a 4-week period. At the end of the study, a second blood sample was collected from all turtles for measurement of 25-hydroxyvitamin D3.

Results—Mean ± SD 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 concentrations differed significantly between turtles provided supplemental UV radiation (71.7 ± 46.9 nmol/L) and those not provided UV radiation (31.4 ± 13.2 nmol/L).

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Appropriate husbandry recommendations for raising and maintaining red-eared slider turtles should include use of sunlight that is unobstructed by UV-B filtering material or provision of an artificial source of UV-B radiation.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To determine whether veterinary-specific oscillometric blood pressure units yield measurements that are in good agreement with directly measured blood pressures in cats.

Design—Evaluation study.

Animals—21 cats undergoing routine spaying or neutering.

Procedures—A 24-gauge catheter was inserted in a dorsal pedal artery, and systolic, diastolic, and mean arterial pressures were directly measured with a validated pressure measurement system. Values were compared with indirect blood pressure measurements obtained with 3 veterinary-specific oscillometric blood pressure units.

Results—There was poor agreement between indirectly and directly measured blood pressures. For unit 1, bias between indirectly and directly measured values was −14.9 mm Hg (95% limits of agreement [LOA], −52.2 to 22.4 mm Hg), 4.4 mm Hg (95% LOA, −26.0 to 34.8 mm Hg), and −1.3 mm Hg (95% LOA, −26.7 to 24.1 mm Hg) for systolic, diastolic, and mean arterial pressures, respectively. For unit 2, bias was −10.3 mm Hg (95% LOA, −52.9 to 32.2 mm Hg), 13.0 mm Hg (95% LOA, −32.1 to 58.0 mm Hg), and 9.1 mm Hg (95% LOA, −32.9 to 51.2 mm Hg) for systolic, diastolic, and mean arterial pressures, respectively. For unit 3, bias was −13.4 mm Hg (95% LOA, −51.8 to 25.1 mm Hg), 8.0 mm Hg (95% LOA, −25.5 to 41.6 mm Hg), and −3.6 mm Hg (95% LOA, −31.6 to 24.5 mm Hg) for systolic, diastolic, and mean arterial pressures, respectively.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggested that none of the 3 veterinary-specific oscillometric blood pressure units could be recommended for indirect measurement of blood pressure in cats.

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To examine the effect of 24 hours of refrigeration on urine samples collected from dogs with signs of urinary tract infection (UTI).

DESIGN Prospective cross-sectional study.

ANIMALS 104 dogs with signs consistent with UTI that had a urine sample collected via cystocentesis as part of their diagnostic workup.

PROCEDURES A 1-mL aliquot of each urine sample was refrigerated at 5°C for 24 hours in a plain glass tube, then processed for quantitative bacterial culture (QBC). A 0.5-mL aliquot was added to 3 mL of tryptic soy broth (TSB) and refrigerated at 5°C for 24 hours, then processed for QBC. The remaining portion was immediately processed for QBC, with results reported as numbers of bacterial colony–forming units (CFUs). Sensitivity of the QBC for detection of bacteria (and therefore UTI) was determined for sample refrigeration in the 2 conditions, compared with immediate processing (reference standard).

RESULTS Bacterial growth was identified in 35.6% (n = 37), 33.7% (35), and 31.7% (33) of the immediately processed, refrigerated, and refrigerated-in-TSB urine samples, respectively. Sample refrigeration without TSB resulted in no significant difference in CFU counts relative to immediate processing; however, the sensitivity of this method was 95% (35/37). Sample refrigeration with TSB resulted in significantly lower CFU counts, and sensitivity was only 89% (33/37).

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Canine urine samples collected for bacterial culture should be immediately submitted for testing. Although CFU counts for refrigerated and immediately processed samples were statistically similar in this study, sample refrigeration in enrichment broth resulted in imperfect sensitivity for UTI detection and is not recommended.

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To determine an efficient method for the collection of semen samples by means of electroejaculation, characterize spermatozoa quality and quantity, and determine the effect of refrigerated storage on motility of spermatozoa obtained from green iguanas (Iguana iguana).

Animals—18 adult green iguanas.

Procedures—Green iguanas were anesthetized, and semen samples were obtained by means of electroejaculation. Up to 3 series of electrostimulations were performed; the procedure was stopped after a semen sample was obtained. Various semen sample variables were evaluated.

Results—Semen samples were obtained from 16 iguanas; most (n = 10) iguanas produced a semen sample after the second series of electrostimulations. Median semen sample volume was 0.05 mL. Mean spermatozoa concentration was 2 69.0 × 106 spermatozoa/mL. Median percentage of motile spermatozoa was 78%. The only morphological abnormality of spermatozoa was bent tails (mean percentage in a semen sample, 5.7%). Spermatozoa motility decreased significantly during refrigeration (4°C); median percentage motility after 24, 48, and 72 hours of refrigeration was 60%, 33%, and 0%, respectively.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results of this study suggested electroejaculation can be performed to collect semen samples from green iguanas, characteristics of iguana semen samples are similar to those for semen samples obtained from other reptiles, and motility of iguana spermatozoa decreases during refrigeration within 48 to 72 hours.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To compare the efficacy of application of an alcohol-based antiseptic (80% ethyl alcohol) hand rub (ABAHR) with that of a 2% chlorhexidine gluconate scrub (CGS2) for immediate reduction of the bacterial population on the skin of dogs.

ANIMALS 50 client-owned dogs with no evidence of skin disease.

PROCEDURES On each dog, 2 areas of hair on the ventral aspect of the abdomen were clipped with a No. 40 blade and cleared of debris. A direct contact plate holding tryptic soy agar with polysorbate 80 and lecithin was gently pressed (for 2 seconds) on each skin site (preapplication sample). The CGS2 and ABAHR were each aseptically applied to 1 skin site on each dog. A direct contact plate was subsequently applied to each site in a similar manner (postapplication sample). All plates were cultured, and bacterial isolates were identified and quantified by the number of CFUs per plate.

RESULTS Application of the CGS2 and ABAHR significantly decreased skin bacterial colony counts, compared with findings for preapplication samples. The number of CFUs per plate or postapplication percentage reduction in CFUs per plate did not differ between treatments. There were no adverse skin reactions associated with either application.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results indicated that applications of ABAHR and CGS2 were equally effective at immediately reducing the bacterial population on the skin of dogs, and there was no significant difference in percentage reduction in colony counts between the 2 applications.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the effects of IM administration of recombinant human thyroid-stimulating hormone (rhTSH) on plasma total thyroxine (T4) concentrations in euthyroid ferrets.

Design—Evaluation study.

Animals—25 healthy neutered ferrets (14 female and 11 male) of various ages from 2 populations (laboratory ferrets from Georgia and pet ferrets from Pennsylvania).

Procedures—Each ferret underwent a physical examination and standard hematologic testing to ensure it was healthy and had clinically normal thyroid function. Once determined to be euthyroid, ferrets received a single IM injection of 100 μg of rhTSH. Blood samples were collected into plasma-separator tubes immediately before the rhTSH injection (time 0) and 4 hours after injection to measure T4 concentrations.

Results—Males did not differ from females in regard to prestimulation or poststimulation plasma T4 concentrations; however, prestimulation and poststimulation T4 concentrations were significantly different between the 2 groups of ferrets. A significant difference was also identified between prestimulation T4 concentration (mean ± SD, 21.3 ± 6.1 nmol/L) and poststimulation T4 concentration (29.9 ± 8.2 nmol/L). All 25 ferrets had high poststimulation T4 concentrations (median difference, 7. 5 nmol/L; 10% to 90% interval, 3.26 to 17.70 nmol/L [0.25 to 1.38 μg/dL]; range, 2.50 to 20.70 nmol/L [0.19 to 1.61 μg/dL]); this represented a median increase in T4 concentration of 35% (10% to 90% interval, 18% to 81%; range, 8% to 126%).

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggested that rhTSH can be used for thyrotropin stimulation testing in ferrets when administered IM. According to the findings, a euthyroid ferret should have an increase of approximately 30% in plasma T4 concentration 4 hours after rhTSH injection.

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association