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  • Author or Editor: Mark Leonard x
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SUMMARY

The effects of single iv injections of sodium bicarbonate (0.5 mEq/kg of body weight, 1 mEq/kg, 2 mEq/kg, and 4 mEq/kg) on serum osmolality, serum sodium, chloride, and potassium concentrations, and venous blood gas tensions in 6 healthy cats were monitored for 180 minutes.

Serum osmolality increased and remained significantly (P < 0.05) increased for 120 minutes in cats given 4 mEq of sodium bicarbonate/kg. Serum sodium was increased significantly (P < 0.05) for 30 minutes in cats given 4 mEq of sodium bicarbonate/kg. Serum sodium decreased and remained significantly (P < 0.05) decreased for 120 minutes in cats given 1 g of 20% mannitol/kg, and serum osmolality was significantly (P < 0.05) decreased at 30 and 60 minutes. Serum chloride decreased significantly (P < 0.05) for 10 minutes in cats given 1 mEq of sodium bicarbonate/kg, and was significantly decreased for 30 minutes in cats given 2 mEq and 4 mEq of sodium bicarbonate/kg. Serum chloride decreased and remained significantly (P < 0.05) decreased for 30 minutes in cats given 1 g of 20% mannitol/kg. Serum sodium and serum osmolality did not change significantly (P < 0.05) in cats given 4 ml of 0.9% sodium chloride/kg.

Serum potassium decreased significantly (P < 0.05) for 10 minutes in cats given 1 mEq of sodium bicarbonate/kg, and for 120 minutes in cats given 2 mEq/kg or 4 mEq/kg. There was a significantly (P < 0.05) greater decrease in serum potassium that lasted for 30 minutes after giving sodium bicarbonate at the dosage of 4 mEq/kg, compared with other dosages given. Serum potassium did not change significantly in cats given 1 g of 20% mannitol/kg, but was significantly (P < 0.05) decreased 10 minutes following 4 ml of 0.9% sodium chloride/kg.

Sodium bicarbonate infusion significantly (P < 0.05) increased venous blood pH and plasma bicarbonate concentration in all cats. The magnitude and duration of these changes were significantly greater following administration of sodium bicarbonate at dosages of 2 mEq/kg and 4 mEq/kg. Significant (P < 0.05) increases in Pco2 were associated only with the highest dosage of sodium bicarbonate (4 mEq/kg). Base excess increased significantly (P < 0.05) in all cats following sodium bicarbonate infusion. There were significantly (P < 0.05) greater increases in base excess lasting 30 minutes following administration of sodium bicarbonate at dosages of 2 mEq/kg and 4 mEq/kg. Significant (P < 0.05) changes in venous blood pH, Pco2 , or bicarbonate were not observed in cats given 4 ml of 0.9% sodium chloride/kg, or in cats given 1 g of 20% mannitol/kg. Base excess was significantly (P < 0.05) increased for 10 minutes in cats given 1 g of 20% mannitol/kg.

As expected, 4 mEq of sodium bicarbonate/kg induced the most time- and dosage-related effects. Caution should be used when administering sodium bicarbonate iv to cats at dosages > 2 mEq/kg, because of the potential for important acid-base and electrolyte changes.

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research