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Abstract

Objective—To describe the clinicopathologic features of a cohort of dogs with adrenocortical masses that underwent laparoscopic adrenalectomy and to compare perioperative morbidity and mortality rates in these dogs with rates for dogs that underwent open adrenalectomy for resection of similarly sized (maximal diameter, ≤ 5 cm) adrenocortical masses.

Design—Retrospective case series.

Animals—48 client-owned dogs that underwent laparoscopic (n = 23) or open (25) adrenalectomy for noninvasive tumors (ie, tumors that did not invade the vena cava or other surrounding organs).

Procedures—Medical records were reviewed. History, clinical signs, physical examination findings, clinicopathologic findings, imaging results, and surgical variables were recorded. A 3- or 4-port approach was used for laparoscopic adrenalectomy. Surgical time, perioperative complications, postoperative and overall hospitalization times, and perioperative deaths were recorded and compared between groups.

Results—The surgical method for 1 dog was converted from a laparoscopic to an open approach. Perioperative death occurred in no dogs in the laparoscopic group and 2 dogs in the open adrenalectomy group. Surgical time was shorter for laparoscopic (median, 90 minutes; range, 40 to 150 minutes) than for open (median, 120 minutes; range, 75 to 195 minutes) adrenalectomy. Laparoscopic adrenalectomy was associated with shorter hospitalization time and more rapid discharge from the hospital after surgery, compared with the open procedure.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—With careful patient selection, laparoscopic adrenalectomy was associated with a low complication rate and low conversion rate for resection of adrenocortical masses as well as shorter surgical and hospitalization times, compared with open adrenalectomy.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To determine prevalence of the contralateral radiographic infrapatellar fat pad sign and contralateral radiographic degenerative sign (degenerative changes) and evaluate both signs as risk factors for subsequent contralateral cranial cruciate ligament (CrCL) rupture in dogs with unilateral CrCL rupture.

Design—Retrospective cohort study.

Animals—96 dogs with unilateral CrCL rupture and 22 dogs with bilateral CrCL rupture.

Procedures—Dogs with unilateral CrCL rupture were classified as having normal (n = 84) or abnormal (12) contralateral stifle joints on the basis of joint palpation. Associations between potential predictive variables and rates of subsequent contralateral CrCL rupture were evaluated.

Results—Of the 84 dogs with unilateral CrCL rupture in which the contralateral stifle joint was palpably normal, 29 (34.5%) had a contralateral fat pad sign and 31 (36.9%) had a degenerative sign. All dogs with unilateral CrCL rupture in which the contralateral stifle joint was palpably abnormal had a contralateral fat pad sign and degenerative sign. The contralateral fat pad sign was the most important risk factor for subsequent rupture of the contralateral CrCL. For dogs with unilateral CrCL rupture and palpably normal contralateral stifle joint with and without a contralateral fat pad sign, median time to subsequent rupture was 421 and 1,688 days, respectively, and the 3-year probability of subsequent rupture was 85.3% and 24.9%, respectively.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Bilateral stifle joint radiography should be performed for all dogs with CrCL rupture. Bilateral stifle joint arthroscopy should be considered for dogs with a contralateral fat pad sign.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To describe clinicopathologic features of dogs that underwent lung lobectomy for resection of primary lung tumors via video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) or open thoracotomy (OT) and to compare short-term outcomes for dogs following these procedures.

Design—Retrospective cohort study.

Animals—46 medium- to large-breed dogs with primary lung tumors.

Procedures—Medical records of dogs that underwent a lung lobectomy via VATS (n = 22) or OT (24) for resection of primary lung tumors between 2004 and 2012 were reviewed. Dogs were included if they weighed > 10 kg (22 lb) and resection of a primary lung tumor was confirmed histologically. Tumor volumes were calculated from preoperative CT scans where available. Surgical time, completeness of excision, time in the ICU, indwelling thoracic drain time, postoperative and total hospitalization time, incidence of major complications, and short-term survival rate were evaluated.

Results—VATS was performed with a 3-port (n = 12) or 4-port (10) technique and 1-lung ventilation (22). In 2 of 22 (9%) dogs, VATS was converted to OT. All dogs survived to discharge from the hospital. There were no significant differences between the VATS and OT groups with regard to most variables. Surgery time was significantly longer for VATS than for OT (median, 120 vs 95 minutes, respectively).

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—In medium- to large-breed dogs, short-term outcomes for dogs that underwent VATS for lung lobectomy were comparable to those of dogs that underwent OT. Further studies are required to evaluate the effects of surgical approach on indices of postoperative pain and long-term outcomes.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association