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Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To assess the pharmacokinetics and opioid effects of methadone after administration of multiple doses by means of 2 dosing regimens of methadone-fluconazole-naltrexone.

ANIMALS

12 healthy Beagles.

PROCEDURES

Dogs were randomly allocated (6 dogs/group) to receive 1 of 2 oral dosing regimens of methadone-fluconazole-naltrexone. Treatment 1 doses were administered at 0 (methadone-to-fluconazole-to-naltrexone ratio of 1:5:0.25 mg/kg), 14 (1:5:0.25), 24 (0.5:2.5:0.125), and 38 (0.5:2.5:0.125) hours. Treatment 2 doses were administered at 0 (1:5:0.25), 4 (0.5:2.5:0.125), 10 (0.5:2.5:0.125), and 24 (0.5:2.5:0.125) hours. Blood samples, rectal temperatures, and von Frey antinociceptive measurements were obtained at designated times.

RESULTS

Compared with baseline, temperatures significantly decreased for treatment 1 group dogs at 2 to ≥ 4 hours and from 16 to ≥ 50 hours (12 hours after last dose) and for treatment 2 group dogs at 2 to ≥ 36 hours (12 hours after last dose), when trough methadone concentrations were ≥ 21.3 ng/mL. Antinociception occurred after the first dose but was not maintained throughout the study. Lesions were noted in some dogs at the application site of the von Frey device. Naltrexone and β-naltrexol were sporadically detected in plasma, and naltrexone glucuronide was consistently detected.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Opioid effects were noted after oral administration of the first dose, and data suggested that administering a second dose 6 hours later and every 12 hours thereafter was necessary to maintain opioid effects. Antinociception may have been lost because dogs became averse or hyperalgesic to the von Frey device, such that the antinociception model used here may not be robust for repeated measurements in dogs.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To determine perioperative analgesia associated with oral administration of a novel methadone-fluconazole-naltrexone formulation in dogs undergoing routine ovariohysterectomy.

ANIMALS

43 healthy female dogs.

PROCEDURES

Dogs were randomly assigned to receive the methadone-fluconazole-naltrexone formulation at 1 of 2 dosages (0.5 mg/kg, 2.5 mg/kg, and 0.125 mg/kg, respectively, or 1.0 mg/kg, 5.0 mg/kg, and 0.25 mg/kg, respectively, PO, q 12 h, starting the evening before surgery; n = 15 each) or methadone alone (0.5 mg/kg, SC, q 4 h starting the morning of surgery; 13). Dogs were sedated with acepromazine, and anesthesia was induced with propofol and maintained with isoflurane. A standard ovariohysterectomy was performed by experienced surgeons. Sedation and pain severity (determined with the Glasgow Composite Pain Scale—short form [GCPS-SF]) were scored for 48 hours after surgery. Rescue analgesia was to be provided if the GCPS-SF score was > 6. Dogs also received carprofen starting the day after surgery.

RESULTS

None of the dogs required rescue analgesia. The highest recorded GCPS-SF score was 4. A significant difference in GCPS-SF score among groups was identified at 6:30 am the day after surgery, but not at any other time. The most common adverse effect was perioperative vomiting, which occurred in 11 of the 43 dogs.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Oral administration of a methadone-fluconazole-naltrexone formulation at either of 2 dosages every 12 hours (3 total doses) was as effective as SC administration of methadone alone every 4 hours (4 total doses) in dogs undergoing routine ovariohysterectomy. Incorporation of naltrexone in the novel formulation may provide a deterrent to human opioid abuse or misuse.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research