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  • Author or Editor: Marie K. Holowaychuk x
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Abstract

Objective—To determine whether the number, volume, or age of transfused packed RBC units; volume of other blood products; or pretransfusion PCV was a risk factor for transfusion-associated complications or nonsurvival in dogs.

Design—Retrospective case series.

Animals—211 client-owned dogs receiving stored packed RBC transfusions.

Procedures—Information collected or calculated from the medical record of each dog included the total number, volume, and dose of packed RBC units; mean age of packed RBC units; number of packed RBC units > 14 days old; age of oldest packed RBC unit; volume and dose of other blood products used; pretransfusion PCV; acute patient physiologic and laboratory evaluation score; transfusion-associated complications; and outcome.

Results—The dose (mL/kg) of other blood products transfused was a risk factor for transfusion-associated complications (OR, 1.03; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.01 to 1.05). The pretransfusion PCV (OR, 1.13; 95% CI, 1.06 to 1.21) and dose of packed RBCs administered (OR, 1.04; 95% CI, 1.02 to 1.07) were risk factors for nonsurvival. Age of transfused packed RBC units was not identified as a risk factor for transfusion-associated complications or nonsurvival, but the study was statistically underpowered to detect this finding.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Administration of larger doses of other non–packed RBC blood products was a risk factor for transfusion-associated complications, and a higher pretransfusion PCV and larger dose of packed RBCs administered were risk factors for nonsurvival. Prospective randomized studies are needed to determine whether conservative transfusion strategies will reduce transfusion-associated complications and improve outcome in dogs.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To determine hospital admission variables for dogs with trauma including values determined with scoring systems (animal trauma triage [ATT], modified Glasgow coma scale [MGCS], and acute patient physiologic and laboratory evaluation [APPLE] scores) and the usefulness of such variables for the prediction of outcome (death vs survival to hospital discharge).

Design—Prospective, multicenter, cohort study.

Animals—315 client-owned dogs.

Procedures—By use of a Web-based data capture system, trained personnel prospectively recorded admission ATT, MGCS, and APPLE scores; clinical and laboratory data; and outcome (death vs survival to discharge) for dogs with trauma at 4 veterinary teaching hospitals during an 8-week period.

Results—Cause of injury was most commonly blunt trauma (173/315 [54.9%]) followed by penetrating trauma (107/315 [34.0%]), or was unknown (35/315 [11.1%]). Of the 315 dogs, 285 (90.5%) survived to hospital discharge. When 16 dogs euthanized because of cost were excluded, dogs with blunt trauma were more likely to survive, compared with dogs with penetrating trauma (OR, 8.5). The ATT (OR, 2.0) and MGCS (OR, 0.47) scores and blood lactate concentration (OR, 1.5) at the time of hospital admission were predictive of outcome. Surgical procedures were performed for 157 (49.8%) dogs; surgery was associated with survival to discharge (OR, 7.1).

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results indicated ATT and MGCS scores were useful for prediction of outcome for dogs evaluated because of trauma. Penetrating trauma, low blood lactate concentration, and performance of surgical procedures were predictive of survival to hospital discharge. The methods enabled collection of data for a large number of dogs in a short time.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To evaluate peripheral blood and abdominal fluid variables as predictors of intestinal surgical site failure in dogs with septic peritonitis following celiotomy and closed-suction abdominal drain (CSAD) placement.

DESIGN Prospective study.

ANIMALS 26 dogs with septic peritonitis that underwent celiotomy and CSAD placement.

PROCEDURES Abdominal fluid and blood samples were collected prior to surgery and daily thereafter until CSAD removal. Abdominal fluid was collected through the CSAD. Analysis of all samples included pH, PCO2, PO2, PCV, WBC count, and total solids, glucose, lactate, and electrolyte concentrations. Abdominal fluid samples also underwent cytologic evaluation and bacterial culture, and the volume of fluid removed through the drain was recorded daily. The blood-to-fluid glucose and lactate differences, fluid-to-blood lactate ratio and blood-to-fluid WBC and neutrophil ratios were determined daily. Dogs were categorized into 2 groups on the basis of whether they had an uneventful recovery (UR) or developed postoperative septic peritonitis (POSP).

RESULTS 23 dogs had a UR and 3 developed POSP. On the third day after surgery, the abdominal fluid WBC count was significantly lower and the blood-to-fluid WBC and neutrophil ratios were significantly higher for dogs in the POSP group, compared with those for dogs in the UR group. None of the other blood and abdominal fluid variables assessed differed significantly between the 2 groups.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results failed to identify any objective predictive indicators for POSP in dogs with CSADs. Use of blood-to-fluid WBC and neutrophil ratios as predictive indicators for POSP requires further investigation.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association