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  • Author or Editor: Margret S. Thompson x
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Abstract

Case Description—An 8-year-old castrated male Boxer and a 10-year-old spayed female Yorkshire Terrier were evaluated because of dyspnea. In both dogs, the dyspnea persisted after elongated soft palate resection.

Clinical Findings—Laryngoscopic examination revealed caudal displacement of the epiglottis into the rima glottidis in both dogs. Excessive mobility of the epiglottis during respiration with episodic obstruction of the rima glottidis by the epiglottis was observed during fluoroscopic examination.

Treatment and Outcome—The epiglottis of both dogs was fixed in a horizontal plane by resection of a band of oral mucosa at the base of the epiglottis and closure of the mucosal defect with sutures. Fixation of the epiglottis resolved the dyspnea in both dogs.

Clinical Relevance—Excessive mobility of the epiglottis can predispose to glottic obstruction and cause dyspnea in dogs. Fixation of the epiglottis in a horizontal plane may resolve dyspnea caused by epiglottic retroversion in dogs.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To determine the complementary DNA (cDNA) sequence of interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1ra) in horses and compare messenger RNA (mRNA) expression of IL-1ra among horses of various breeds.

Sample Population—Blood samples from neonatal and adult horses examined for a variety of diseases.

Procedure—A polymerase chain reaction procedure was used to amplify a 220 base pair (bp) portion of the genomic DNA. The upstream and downstream regions of the cDNA sequence were determined by means of 5' and 3' rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) procedures. Northern blot hybridization was used to examine steady-state mRNA expression of IL- 1ra.

Results—The consensus sequence of the cDNA obtained with the 5'-RACE procedure and the sequence for the 220 bp portion of the genomic DNA represented the putative sequence for secreted IL- 1ra. The predicted secreted IL-1ra amino acid sequence contained 176 residues with an in-frame stop codon; the N-terminal 25 amino acid residues resembled the signal peptide reported for human secreted IL-1ra. An approximately 1.3 kilobase pair (kb) band that represented a portion of the 3' end of the coding region and the 3' untranslated region was obtained by use of the 3' -RACE procedure. Northern blot hybridization detected a 1.6 kb transcript in blood RNA from adult Arabian, Belgian, Thoroughbred, and Standardbred horses.

Conclusions—Results suggest that the DNA for equine secreted IL-1ra has a short (29 bp) 5' untranslated region, a 534 bp coding region, and a long (approximately 1,080 bp) untranslated region. (Am J Vet Res 2000;61:920–924)

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Case Description—An 8-year-old male red kangaroo (Macropus rufus) was evaluated with a 2-week history of vomiting and anorexia. Four days prior, the patient became refractory to medical management. The kangaroo was admitted for diagnostic testing and treatment including whole body CT, blood work, and emergency laparotomy.

Clinical Findings—CT findings of a severely enlarged stomach, splenic displacement, and a whirl sign were indicative of mesenteric volvulus with gastric dilatation-volvulus (GDV). Contrast enhancement of abdominal viscera suggested intact arterial blood supply; however, compression of the caudal vena cava and portal vein indicated venous obstruction. Results of preoperative blood work suggested biliary stasis without evidence of inflammation. Additionally, a tooth root abscess was diagnosed on the basis of results of CT.

Treatment and Outcome—Exploratory laparotomy confirmed the diagnosis of mesenteric volvulus and GDV. The volvuli were corrected by clockwise derotation, and a gastropexy was performed. Tissue samples were obtained from the spleen and liver for evaluation. The kangaroo recovered from surgery, and the abscessed tooth was extracted 6 days later. Eight days after initial evaluation, the kangaroo was discharged.

Clinical Relevance—In the present report, the CT whirl sign was used to diagnose volvulus of the abdominal viscera, which suggests that this diagnostic indicator has utility in veterinary patients. Mesenteric volvulus with GDV was successfully treated in a nondomestic species. The tooth root abscess, a common condition in macropods, may explain the historic episodes of anorexia reported by the owner and may have contributed to the development of mesenteric volvulus and GDV in this kangaroo.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To determine whether frontal-sinus size is associated with syringohydromyelia.

Sample Population—Medical records and magnetic resonance images of 62 small-breed dogs.

Procedures—Medical records and magnetic resonance images were reviewed retrospectively for evaluation of frontal-sinus size and syringohydromyelia. A Yates-corrected 2-tailed χ2 test was used to determine whether an association existed between absent or miniscule frontal sinuses and syringohydromyelia. The strength of the association was evaluated by means of prevalence and odds ratios.

Results—Absent or miniscule air-filled frontal sinuses were detected in 28 of 62 (45%) dogs, and syringohydromyelia was detected in 12 of 62 (19%) dogs. Syringohydromyelia was detected in 10 of 28 dogs with absent or miniscule frontal sinuses (prevalence, 36%; 95% confidence interval, 16% to 55%) and in 2 of 34 dogs with larger frontal sinuses (prevalence, 6%; confidence interval, 0% to 15%). The probability of detecting syringohy-dromyelia in dogs with absent or miniscule air-filled frontal sinuses was significantly greater than the probability of detecting it in dogs with larger frontal sinuses. The prevalence ratio was 6.1, and the odds ratio was 8.9.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—An association between frontal-sinus size and syringohydromyelia was identified in small-breed dogs, suggesting that the pathogenesis of syringohydromyelia in some instances may involve abnormal development of the entire or supratentorial part of the cranium, as opposed to being limited to the infratentorial part.

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research