Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 3 of 3 items for

  • Author or Editor: Margaret Patterson x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All Modify Search

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To determine the presentation, diagnosis, progression, and family risk of fibrotic myopathy, a disease with marked breed predisposition in the German Shepherd Dog (GSD).

ANIMALS

41 dogs prospectively recruited to the University of Wisconsin-Madison Comparative Genetics and Orthopedic Laboratory between November 2019 to August 2022.

METHODS

Medical records of dogs diagnosed with fibrotic myopathy were reviewed upon referral. The following data were recorded: sex, age, weight, regio interscapularis (withers) height, date of neutering, coat color and length, and age at fibrotic myopathy diagnosis. A pedigree was also obtained.

RESULTS

In the study population, breeds included 37 GSDs, a Belgian Malinois, a Belgian Malinois cross, and 2 dogs with a GSD phenotype and no pedigree. Mean age at fibrotic myopathy diagnosis was 5.9 ± 2.0 years, and duration of lameness before diagnosis was 5.6 months and ranged from 0.75 to 18 months. Males were overrepresented at 61% of the study population. Inherited familial risk for fibrotic myopathy in the GSD was supported by pedigree analysis.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

This was the largest case series of fibrotic myopathy to date, providing a more comprehensive look at presentation and progression of the disease. The longer duration of lameness in bilaterally affected dogs likely represents disease progression rather than a more severe phenotype. Family history data support a genetic contribution to fibrotic myopathy, suggesting that further genetic investigation is warranted.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate concordance among veterinary pathologists in the assessment of histologic findings in the pars intermedia of pituitary gland sections from aged horses with mild signs suggestive of pituitary pars intermedia dysfunction (PPID).

Sample Population—10 pituitary glands from aged horses.

Procedure—7 pathologists were provided with signalment, clinical signs, and a single H&E-stained pituitary gland section from 10 aged horses with mild signs suggestive of PPID. Pathologists described histologic findings for each section and stated whether findings were consistent with PPID. Agreement among pathologists and with antemortem diagnostic test results was calculated.

Results—Overall, only fair agreement was found among the pathologists as to which horses had histologic findings consistent with disease (mean ± SE kappa value, 0.34 ± 0.069). Interpretation of individual sections varied, with minimal agreement (4 or 5/7 pathologists) for 5 of 10 sections evaluated. Postmortem assessment was in agreement with an antemortem endocrine diagnostic test result 79% of the time.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Validation of antemortem diagnostic testing for PPID in horses often relies on the results of postmortem histologic evaluation. The lack of consensus in histologic interpretation of pituitary glands from aged horses with mild clinical signs in our study indicates that postmortem histologic evaluation of pituitary glands is an inappropriate standard in validation of antemortem diagnostic tests for detection of early PPID. Caution should be used when interpreting diagnostic test results in horses in which early PPID is suspected. (Am J Vet Res 2005;66:2055–2059)

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

The aim of this study was to investigate whether plasma neurofilament light chain (pNfL) concentration was altered in Labrador Retrievers with idiopathic laryngeal paralysis (ILP) compared to a control population. A secondary aim was to investigate relationships between age, height, weight, and body mass index in the populations studied.

ANIMALS

123 dogs: 62 purebred Labrador Retrievers with ILP (ILP Cases) and 61 age-matched healthy medium- to large-breed dogs (Controls).

METHODS

Dogs, recruited from August 1, 2016, to March 1, 2022, were categorized as case or control based on a combination of physical exam, neurologic exam, and history. Blood plasma was collected, and pNfL concentration was measured. pNfL concentrations were compared between ILP Cases and Controls. Covariables including age, height, and weight were collected. Relationships between pNfL and covariables were analyzed within and between groups. In dogs where 2 plasma samples were available from differing time points, pNfL concentrations were measured to evaluate alterations over time.

RESULTS

No significant difference in pNfL concentration was found between ILP Cases and Control (P = .36). pNfL concentrations had moderate negative correlations with weight and height in the Control group; other variables did not correlate with pNfL concentrations in ILP Case or Control groups. pNfL concentrations do not correlate with ILP disease status or duration in Labrador Retrievers.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

There is no evidence that pNfL levels are altered due to ILP disease duration or progression when compared with healthy controls. When evaluating pNfL concentrations in the dog, weight and height should be considered.

Open access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research