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  • Author or Editor: Marcus G. Doherr x
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Abstract

Objective—To determine the prevalence of spinal cord compression subsequent to traumatic intervertebral disk (IVD) extrusion in dogs, characterize factors associated with spinal cord compression in dogs with traumatic IVD extrusion, and evaluate the outcomes of dogs with traumatic IVD extrusion with or without spinal cord compression.

Design—Retrospective case series.

Animals—31 dogs with traumatic IVD extrusion.

Procedures—Medical records and MRI findings were reviewed for dogs with a history of trauma to the spinal region. Dogs were included in the study if a neurologic examination and MRI were performed and there was a description of clinical signs and MRI findings including identification of the spinal cord segment affected by IVD extrusion, presence or absence of spinal cord compression, treatment, and outcome available for review.

Results—31 of 50 (62%) dogs had traumatic IVD extrusions without any other detectable vertebral lesions; 9 (29%) and 22 (71%) of those 31 dogs did and did not have spinal cord compression, respectively. Dogs with spinal cord compression were significantly older and more likely to be chondrodystrophic and have evidence of generalized IVD degeneration, compared with dogs without spinal cord compression. The outcome for dogs with spinal cord compression was similar to that for dogs without spinal cord compression.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results indicated traumatic IVD extrusion was common and should be considered as a differential diagnosis for dogs with trauma to the spinal region, and spinal cord compression should be evaluated, especially in older or chondrodystrophic dogs.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To compare the cardiopulmonary effects of anesthesia maintained by continuous infusion of ketamine and propofol with anesthesia maintained by inhalation of sevoflurane in goats undergoing magnetic resonance imaging.

Animals—8 Saanen goats.

Procedures—Goats were anesthetized twice (1-month interval) following sedation with midazolam (0.4 mg/kg, IV). Anesthesia was induced via IV administration of ketamine (3 mg/kg) and propofol (1 mg/kg) and maintained with an IV infusion of ketamine (0.03 mg/kg/min) and propofol (0.3 mg/kg/min) and 100% inspired oxygen (K-P treatment) or induced via IV administration of propofol (4 mg/kg) and maintained via inhalation of sevoflurane in oxygen (end-expired concentration, 2.3%; 1X minimum alveolar concentration; SEVO treatment). Cardiopulmonary and blood gas variables were assessed at intervals after induction of anesthesia.

Results—Mean ± SD end-expired sevoflurane was 2.24 ± 0.2%; ketamine and propofol were infused at rates of 0.03 ± 0.002 mg/kg/min and 0.29 ± 0.02 mg/kg/min, respectively. Overall, administration of ketamine and propofol for total IV anesthesia was associated with a degree of immobility and effects on cardiopulmonary parameters that were comparable to those associated with anesthesia maintained by inhalation of sevoflurane. Compared with the K-P treatment group, mean and diastolic blood pressure values in the SEVO treatment group were significantly lower at most or all time points after induction of anesthesia. After both treatments, recovery from anesthesia was good or excellent.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggest that ketamine-propofol total IV anesthesia in goats breathing 100% oxygen is practical and safe for performance of magnetic resonance imaging procedures. (Am J Vet Res 2005;66:2135–2141)

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To compare severity of postoperative pain in dogs undergoing hemilaminectomy because of acute thoracolumbar intervertebral disk disease treated with a combination of conventional analgesics and electroacupuncture (EAP) or with conventional analgesics alone.

Design—Controlled clinical trial.

Animals—15 dogs undergoing surgery because of acute thoracolumbar disk disease.

Procedures—Dogs were alternately assigned to treatment (conventional analgesics and adjunct EAP) and control (conventional analgesics alone) groups. Analgesic treatment was adjusted as necessary by the attending clinician, who was not aware of group assignment. Pain scores were assigned 1, 3, and 12 hours after surgery and every 12 hours thereafter for 72 hours by the same individual who performed acupuncture treatments.

Results—Total dose of fentanyl administered during the first 12 hours after surgery was significantly lower in the treatment group than in the control group, but dosages of analgesics administered from 12 through 72 hours after surgery did not differ between groups. Pain score was significantly lower in the treatment group than in the control group 36 hours after surgery, but did not differ significantly between groups at any other time.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results provided equivocal evidence that adjunct EAP might provide some mild benefit in regard to severity of postoperative pain in dogs undergoing hemilaminectomy because of acute thoracolumbar intervertebral disk disease.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To determine whether lymphocyte apoptosis in intestinal mucosae is more common in healthy dogs than dogs with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and whether numbers of apoptotic cells increase after successful treatment of affected dogs.

Animals—8 dogs with IBD (IBD dogs) and 8 healthy control dogs.

Procedures—Biopsy specimens of the duodenum and colon were obtained via endoscopy from dogs with IBD before and after 10 weeks of standard treatment and compared with specimens obtained from control dogs. Expression of activated caspase 3 (Casp3), caspase-cleaved fragment p85 from poly-ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP), and B-cell leukemia/lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) was measured in the duodenal (villous tip and base) and colonic mucosae.

Results—Expression of Casp3 was greater in the duodenal villous tips of control dogs, compared with expression in similar tissues from dogs with IBD before or after treatment. Despite clinical improvement of dogs with IBD, expression of Casp3 did not increase after treatment. Expression of PARP did not differ between groups at any time point. Expression of Bcl-2 was greater at all 3 tissue sites in control dogs, compared with expression at the same sites in dogs with IBD. Furthermore, Bcl-2 expression in duodenal villous tips was higher in dogs with IBD after treatment but was not higher elsewhere. In control dogs, expression patterns for all 3 markers were similar between sites (villous tip > villous base > colon).

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Expression of Casp3 in lymphocytes in duodenal villous tips was significantly reduced in dogs with IBD, compared with expression in healthy dogs, but no increase was detected following successful treatment of IBD. Increased expression of Bcl-2 may be a potential marker of the success of treatment.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To compare oral administration of lomustine and prednisolone with oral administration of prednisolone alone as treatment for granulomatous meningoencephalomyelitis (GME) or necrotizing encephalitis (NE) in dogs.

Design—Retrospective cohort study.

Animals—25 dogs with GME and 18 dogs with NE (diagnosis confirmed in 8 and 5 dogs, respectively).

Procedures—Records of dogs with GME or NE were reviewed for results of initial neurologic assessments and clinicopathologic findings, treatment, follow-up clinicopathologic findings (for lomustine-treated dogs), and survival time. Dogs with GME or NE treated with lomustine and prednisolone were assigned to groups 1 (n = 14) and 3 (10), respectively; those treated with prednisolone alone were assigned to groups 2(11) and 4 (8), respectively.

Results—Prednisolone was administered orally every 12 hours to all dogs. In groups 1 and 3, mean lomustine dosage was 60.3 mg/m2, PO, every 6 weeks. Median survival times in groups 1 through 4 were 457, 329, 323, and 91 days, respectively (no significant difference between groups 1 and 2 or between groups 3 and 4). Within the initial 12 months of treatment, median prednisolone dosage was reduced in all groups; dosage reduction in group 1 was significantly larger than that in group 2 at 6, 9, and 12 months. Combination treatment most frequently caused leukopenia, but had no significant effect on liver enzyme activities.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—In dogs with GME and NE, oral administration of lomustine and prednisolone or prednisolone alone had similar efficacy. Inclusion of lomustine in the treatment regimen was generally tolerated well.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To describe the presence and amount of apoptotic ligamentous cells in different areas of partially ruptured canine cranial cruciate ligaments (prCCLs) and to compare these findings with apoptosis of ligamentous cells in totally ruptured cranial cruciate ligaments (trCCLs).

Animals—20 dogs with prCCLs and 14 dogs with trCCLs.

Procedures—Dogs with prCCLs or trCCLs were admitted to the veterinary hospital for stifle joint treatment. Biopsy specimens of the intact area of prCCLs (group A) and the ruptured area of prCCLs (group B) as well as specimens from trCCLs (group C) were harvested during arthroscopy. Caspase-3 and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) detection were used to detect apoptotic ligamentous cells by immunohistochemistry.

Results—No difference was found in the degree of synovitis or osteophytosis between prCCLs and trCCLs. No difference was found in degenerative changes in ligaments between groups A and B. A substantial amount of apoptotic cells could be found in > 90% of all stained slides. A correlation (rs = 0.71) was found between the number of caspase-3-and PARP-positive cells. No significant difference was found in the amount of apoptotic cells among the 3 groups. No significant correlation could be detected between the degree of synovitis and apoptotic cells or osteophyte production and apoptotic cells.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—The lack of difference between the 3 groups indicates that apoptosis could be a factor in the internal disease process leading to CCL rupture and is not primarily a consequence of the acute rupture of the ligament.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate pulsed-wave Doppler spectral parameters as a method for distinguishing between neoplastic and inflammatory peripheral lymphadenopathy in dogs.

Sample Population—40 superficial lymph nodes from 33 dogs with peripheral lymphadenopathy.

Procedures—3 Doppler spectral tracings were recorded from each node. Spectral Doppler analysis including assessment of the resistive index, peak systolic velocity-to-end diastolic velocity (S:D) ratio, diastolic notch velocity-to-peak systolic velocity (N:S) ratio, and end diastolic velocity-to-diastolic notch velocity ratio was performed for each tracing. Several calculation methods were used to determine the Doppler indices for each lymph node. After the ultrasonographic examination, fine needle aspirates or excisional biopsy specimens of the examined lymph nodes were obtained, and lymphadenopathy was classified as either inflammatory or neoplastic (lymphomatous or metastatic) via cytologic or histologic examination. Results of Doppler analysis were compared with cytologic or histopathologic findings.

Results—The Doppler index with the highest diagnostic accuracy was the S:D ratio calculated from the first recorded tracing; a cutoff value of 3.22 yielded sensitivity of 91%, specificity of 100%, and negative predictive value of 89% for detection of neoplasia. Overall diagnostic accuracy was 95%. At a sensitivity of 100%, the most accurate index was the N:S ratio calculated from the first recorded tracing; a cutoff value of 0.45 yielded specificity of 67%, positive predictive value of 81%, and overall diagnostic accuracy of 86.5%.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggested that noninvasive Doppler spectral analysis may be useful in the diagnosis of neoplastic versus inflammatory peripheral lymphadenopathy in dogs.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate serum concentrations of biochemical markers and survival time in dogs with protein-losing enteropathy (PLE).

Design—Prospective study.

Animals—29 dogs with PLE and 18 dogs with food-responsive diarrhea (FRD).

Procedures—Data regarding serum concentrations of various biochemical markers at the initial evaluation were available for 18 of the 29 dogs with PLE and compared with findings for dogs with FRD. Correlations between biochemical marker concentrations and survival time (interval between time of initial evaluation and death or euthanasia) for dogs with PLE were evaluated.

Results—Serum C-reactive protein concentration was high in 13 of 18 dogs with PLE and in 2 of 18 dogs with FRD. Serum concentration of canine pancreatic lipase immunoreactivity was high in 3 dogs with PLE but within the reference interval in all dogs with FRD. Serum α1-proteinase inhibitor concentration was less than the lower reference limit in 9 dogs with PLE and 1 dog with FRD. Compared with findings in dogs with FRD, values of those 3 variables in dogs with PLE were significantly different. Serum calprotectin (measured by radioimmunoassay and ELISA) and S100A12 concentrations were high but did not differ significantly between groups. Seventeen of the 29 dogs with PLE were euthanized owing to this disease; median survival time was 67 days (range, 2 to 2,551 days).

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Serum C-reactive protein, canine pancreatic lipase immunoreactivity, and α1-proteinase inhibitor concentrations differed significantly between dogs with PLE and FRD. Most initial biomarker concentrations were not predictive of survival time in dogs with PLE.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association