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  • Author or Editor: Man-Bok Jeong x
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Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the prevalence of and risk factors for development of corneal ulcers after nonocular surgery performed with general anesthesia in dogs.

Design—Retrospective case-control study.

Animals—14 dogs with development of corneal ulcers after nonocular surgery and 718 control dogs.

Procedures—Medical records of dogs evaluated at the Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital of Seoul National University from January 2009 to June 2011 were reviewed for assessment of risk factors for development of corneal ulcers.

Results—Among the 732 reviewed cases, 14 (1.9%) dogs of 6 breeds developed a corneal ulcer after nonocular surgery. Duration of anesthesia was significantly longer in dogs with ulcers than dogs without ulcers. The number of medications received and procedures performed were also significantly higher in dogs with ulcers than dogs without ulcers. Dogs with a small skull (OR, 8.59; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.04 to 70.90) and dogs that received neurosurgery (OR, 21.12; 95% CI, 5.77 to 77.25) were more susceptible to development of corneal ulcers. Also, postoperative application of a fentanyl patch was a risk factor for development of corneal ulcers (OR, 4.53; 95% CI, 1.05 to 19.60).

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Several risk factors were identified for development of corneal ulcers after nonocular surgery was performed with general anesthesia in dogs. Perioperative eye protection strategies and postoperative ophthalmic examination are needed to reduce the occurrence of corneal ulcers and their progression, especially for high-risk dogs and procedures.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the mydriatic effect of intracameral injection of preservative-free 1% and 2% lidocaine hydrochloride solutions and determine the onset and duration of mydriasis according to the concentration and volume of lidocaine administered in healthy dogs.

Animals—5 healthy adult Beagles weighing 7 to 10 kg, with no apparent ocular disease.

Procedures—A double-blind randomized 9-session crossover trial was designed. Both eyes were assigned to 9 treatments with a minimum 7-day washout period between treatments: 0.1, 0.2, and 0.3 mL of 2% lidocaine solution; 0.1, 0.2, and 0.3 mL of 1% lidocaine solution; and 0.1, 0.2, and 0.3 mL of balanced salt solution. Dogs were anesthetized, and the allocated treatment was injected intracamerally after aspiration of the same volume of aqueous humor from the anterior chamber of each eye. Two perpendicular pupil diameters were measured. Intraocular pressure, heart rate, respiratory rate, ECG readings, and end-tidal partial pressure of CO2 were monitored.

Results—Intracameral injection of 1% or 2% lidocaine solutions in volumes of 0.1 to 0.3 mL induced a significant degree of mydriasis, and the effect was maintained for 74 to 142 minutes. Lidocaine injection had no significant effect on intraocular pressure, heart rate, respiratory rate, ECG readings, or end-tidal partial pressure of CO2.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Intracameral lidocaine injection in healthy dogs induced mydriasis, the timing of which was affected by concentration and volume of lidocaine. This technique could serve as an alternative to topically administered mydriatics for intraocular surgery in dogs.

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research