Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 4 of 4 items for

  • Author or Editor: Malgorzata A. Pozor x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All Modify Search
History

A 12-year-old 500-kg (1,100-lb) nulliparous American Paint mare was admitted to the veterinary teaching hospital at the University of Florida College of Veterinary Medicine because of signs of colic following natural breeding. The farm manager reported that the mare had been bred 3 times over a 72-hour period during estrus. The breeding behavior of the stallion was unremarkable, but blood was detected on the stallion's penis at dismount following the final breeding. Colic-like behavior was detected in the mare approximately 30 minutes after the final breeding. The mare also postured to urinate and intermittently passed hemorrhagic vulvar discharge.

Two

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Case Description—A 4-year-old Thoroughbred mare was evaluated because of placental abnormalities and a retained placental remnant.

Clinical Findings—Microbial culture of the placenta yielded pure growth of Amycolatopsis spp. Histologic examination of the placenta revealed a focally expanding chorionitis with intralesional gram-positive filamentous bacilli and multifocal allantoic adenomatous hyperplasia on the apposing allantoic surface.

Treatment and Outcome—Treatment with lavage and oxytocin resulted in expulsion of the placental remnant within hours of parturition. The mare did not become pregnant again despite multiple breedings. The foal appeared healthy but died of complications during an elective surgical procedure at 7 weeks of age.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—To the author's knowledge, all previously confirmed cases of nocardioform placentitis have been in mares bred in the central Kentucky region. Indications that the pathogen in the mare reported here is a different species than that isolated in Kentucky suggest that this is an emerging disease. Mares with nocardioform placentitis usually do not have the same clinical signs as mares with placentitis resulting from an ascending pathogen.

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
History

A 16-year-old Quarter Horse stallion was examined to determine the cause for bilateral enlargement of the scrotum. The scrotum had gradually become enlarged during the preceding 12-month period, with enlargement most noticeable during the past 6 to 8 months. The stallion had signs of discomfort during the past 2 to 3 months.

The year prior to the scrotal enlargement, the stallion had been used for breeding. According to the owner, the stallion had normal fertility and impregnated numerous mares. During the 12 months prior to examination, the stallion was also used for breeding but did not successfully impregnate any

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
History

A 15-year-old Thoroughbred mare at 283 days of gestation was examined to determine the cause of frank, hemorrhagic vaginal discharge. The mare was from a large breeding farm and had been housed with other broodmares, none of which had any signs of reproductive problems. The mare had had 8 previous pregnancies, all with no complications.

The hemorrhagic discharge had been evident for 2 days and was believed to be increasing in quantity. The referring veterinarian had detected placental abnormalities during ultrasonography. The mare had no other outward signs of disease and did not appear to be in discomfort.

Results

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association