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  • Author or Editor: Maisie E. Dawes x
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Abstract

Objective—To determine the effect of timing of firstmilking colostrum collection on colostral IgG concentration.

Design—Prospective study.

Animals—13 healthy Holstein cows.

Procedures—All calvings were observed. After parturition, calves were not allowed to suckle and were separated from the dam. Colostrum was collected from a single randomly selected quarter at 2, 6, 10, and 14 hours after parturition until all 4 quarters were sampled. Colostral IgG concentration was determined via radial immunodiffusion.

Results—Mean colostral IgG concentration was 113, 94, 82, and 76 g/L at 2, 6, 10, and 14 hours after calving, respectively. Colostrum collected 6, 10, and 14 hours after calving had significantly lower IgG concentrations than did colostrum collected 2 hours after calving. Mean colostral IgG concentration at 14 hours after calving was significantly lower than that at 6 hours after calving. Cows in their third or greater lactation had mean colostral IgG concentrations 2 hours after calving (132 g/L) that were greater than the first and second lactation cows (mean, 95 and 100 g/L, respectively).

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results indicate that early or immediate colostrum collection from dairy cows will maximize colostral IgG concentration. Adjustment of routine dairy farm management procedures may be required to maximize colostrum quality and minimize prevalence of failure of passive transfer in dairy calves. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2005;226:1375–1377)

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate diagnostic utility of a commercially available immunoassay for assessing adequacy of passive transfer of immunity in neonatal calves.

Design—Prospective study.

Animals—123 calves.

Procedure—Blood and serum samples were obtained from the calves prior to 2 weeks of age. The immunoassay was performed, along with refractometry and an 18% sodium sulfite turbidity test. Serum IgG concentration was determined with a radial immunodiffusion assay. Sensitivity and specificity of the immunoassay, refractometry, and the sodium sulfite test were calculated by comparing results with results of the radial immunodiffusion assay.

Results—Sensitivity and specificity of the blood IgG immunoassay were 0.93 and 0.88, respectively, compared with 1.00 and 0.53 for the sodium sulfite test. For refractometry, sensitivity and specificity were 0.71 and 0.83, respectively, when a serum total solids concentration of 5.2 g/dl was used as the cutoff between positive and negative test results.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggest that the immunoassayperforms well in detecting calves with inadequate passive transfer of immunity. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2002;220:791–793)

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the effect of lactoferrin on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced proliferation of bovine peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), gene expression of inflammatory mediators, and production of prostanoids in vitro.

Sample Population—PBMCs isolated from 15 Holstein bull calves.

Procedures—Mixed populations of PBMCs were isolated by differential centrifugation. Proliferation assays were conducted in 96-well plates designed to allow addition of lactoferrin (200 ng/mL) with and without LPS (1 μg/mL) in a checkerboard design. Incorporation of 3H-thymidine was used to determine proliferation of PBMCs. Prostaglandin E2 production was determined in culture-conditioned medium by use of enzyme immunoassay. Effects of lactoferrin on LPS-induced gene expression of cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 were monitored by use of PCR assays.

Results—Lactoferrin supplementation significantly reduced LPS-induced incorporation of 3H-thymidine and production of prostaglandin E2 by PBMCs. Lactoferrin reduced LPS-induced expression of COX-2 and MMP-9 mRNA.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Lactoferrin reduced LPS-induced cellular proliferation, inflammatory mediator gene expression, and prostaglandin E2 production by bovine PBMCs in vitro. These effects may be beneficial in reducing the impact of endotoxemia in neonates.

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To determine sensitivity and specificity of a cow-side immunoassay kit for assessing IgG concentration in colostrum.

Design—Prospective study.

Animals—76 dairy and 11 beef cows of various parities.

Procedure—Colostrum from first, second, and third milkings and milk samples were collected, and IgG concentration was determined by means of radial immunodiffusion. The immunoassay was performed according to the manufacturer’s instructions, and sensitivity and specificity were calculated by comparing results of the immunoassay (positive vs negative) with results of immunodiffusion (< 50 g/L vs ≥ 50 g/L).

Results—135 colostrum or milk samples were collected. Mean ± SD colostral IgG concentrations, determined by means of radial immunodiffusion for dairy and beef cows were 65.4 ± 51.4 g/L and 114.8 ± 42.7 g/L, respectively. Mean IgG concentrations for first-, second-, and third-milking colostrum samples and for milk samples were 92 ± 49.0 g/L, 74.6 ± 45.1 g/L, 47.5 ± 32 g/L, and 6.8 ± 3.8 g/L, respectively. Sensitivity of the immunoassay (ie, percentage of samples with IgG concentration < 50 g/L with a positive immunoassay result) was 93%, and specificity (ie, percentage of samples with IgG concentration ± 50 g/L with a negative immunoassay result) was 76%.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggested that the immunoassay kit was an acceptable cow-side test to identify colostrum samples with IgG concentrations < 50 g/L. The immunoassay kit should be useful in screening colostrum for adequate IgG concentration before feeding to calves or storage. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2005;227:129–131)

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
History

A 7-day-old 40-kg mixed-breed beef heifer calf was presented for recheck evaluation because of persistent signs of inspiratory dyspnea. Four days earlier, the calf had been examined because of labored breathing with marked abdominal effort that developed after the calf (unwitnessed birth) had been kicked and appeared rejected by its dam; was deemed to have had a clinically normal body temperature, pulse, and behavior and no obvious signs of dysmaturity or congenital defects; and then tube fed 2 L of colostrum harvested from its dam. During the initial examination 4 days earlier, the calf was febrile (rectal temperature unknown),

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association