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Abstract

Objective—To determine the response rate after administration of a single dose of doxorubicin in dogs with B-cell or T-cell multicentric or thymic lymphoma.

Design—Retrospective case series.

Animals—41 client-owned dogs with lymphoma.

Procedures—Medical records of dogs in which lymphoma was diagnosed between February 2006 and October 2008 were reviewed. Entry criteria included that dogs had a confirmed lymphoma that was immunophenotyped to be of B-cell or T-cell origin. Only dogs that received doxorubicin alone as their first chemotherapy treatment and were evaluated 1 week later were included in the study. Dogs were excluded when they had received prior treatment with corticosteroids. Medical records were reviewed to obtain signalment, stage and substage of lymphoma, and immunophenotype and to determine whether the dog had hypercalcemia at the time of diagnosis.

Results—Dogs with T-cell lymphoma had a significantly lower response rate to doxorubicin than did dogs with B-cell lymphoma. Twenty-five of 29 (86.2%) dogs with B-cell lymphoma had a complete response, compared with 2 of 12 dogs in the T-cell group that had a complete response. The overall response rate of dogs with B-cell lymphoma was 100%, compared with a response rate of 50% in dogs with T-cell lymphoma.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Standard-of-care chemotherapy protocols for the treatment of dogs with lymphoma include doxorubicin. Many dogs with T-cell lymphoma did not respond to doxorubicin; therefore, multiagent protocols containing doxorubicin may not be optimal. Alternative protocols should be considered for dogs with T-cell lymphoma that do not respond to doxorubicin.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Summary

Nine dogs with intermediate- or high-grade lymphoma were prospectively entered into a protocol to be given a total of 15 weekly doses of doxorubicin (10 mg/m2 of body surface, iv) in an attempt to eliminate all clinical evidence of neoplasia, with minimal risk of drug toxicity. Eight of these dogs did not complete the protocol because of progression of the disease. The median number of doses administered to dogs that developed progressive disease before the regimen was completed was 5 (range, 2 to 9). Seven dogs achieved partial (n = 5) or complete (n = 2) remission, with median duration of 14 days (range, 7 to 231 days). The dog that was given all 15 weekly treatments remained in complete remission for 231 days. Complete remission that lasted for 14 days was observed in another dog. Toxicosis developed in 3 dogs; signs of toxicosis were generally mild and included colitis (n = 1), vomiting (n = 1), neutropenia (n = 1), and lethargy (n = 1). The lowest neutrophil count (1,876 cells/μl) was seen in one dog after 7 doses of doxorubicin were given. Doxorubicin at dosage of 10 mg/m2/wk appears to be safe, but is generally ineffective for treatment of lymphoma.

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To assess whether dogs with blastomycosis produce antibodies against the WI-1 and A-antigens of Blastomyces dermatitidis and whether the antibodies are useful in serodiagnosis.

Sample Population—359 serum samples obtained from 245 dogs.

Procedure—233 samples from 122 dogs with blastomycosis, and 1 sample each from 24 dogs with suspected blastomycosis, 51 control dogs without infection, and 48 healthy dogs from an enzootic region were obtained. Antibodies against WI-1 antigen were detected by radioimmunoassay (RIA). Serum samples were tested in parallel for antibodies against the Aantigen of B dermatitidis by commercial agar-gel immunodiffusion (AGID) in a reference laboratory.

Results—Antibodies were detected in 92% of infected dogs by RIA and in 41% by AGID. For 29 serum samples that were obtained 11 to 1,545 days after diagnosis, antibodies were detected in 92% of samples by RIA and 7% by AGID. For 93 serial serum samples from 29 dogs with blastomycosis, the mean anti-WI-1 titer was 1:18,761 at the time of diagnosis, and decreased to a mean of 1:1,338 by 210 days after treatment was initiated. Of 24 dogs with suspected infection, antibodies were detected in 67% by RIA and 33% by AGID. Control dogs without blastomycosis had no detectable antibodies in either assay. Thus, sensitivity was 92% for RIA and 41% for AGID, and specificity was 100% for both tests.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Anti-WI-1 antibodies are readily detected by RIA in dogs with blastomycosis. Titers become high, decline during treatment, and persist for months. Anti-A antibodies are sometimes detected with AGID, but these decrease quickly. (Am J Vet Res 2000;61:554–558)

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To describe the pool-raft recovery system protocol and to evaluate the clinical outcome inhorses that underwent recovery from general anes-thesia using this system.

Design—Retrospective study.

Animals—393 horses that underwent recovery fromgeneral anesthesia in the pool-raft system.

Procedure—Anesthetic records were examined fromhorses recovered from anesthesia in the pool-raft sys-tem between January 1984 and December 2000.Complete medical records of horses were examinedwhen available. Information regarding the anestheticand recovery period was recorded. Horses first recov-ered from general anesthesia in the pool-raft and,once awake, were transported to a recovery stall andlowered to the floor in a standing position.

Results—351 horses underwent 1 pool-raft recovery,and 42 horses underwent multiple pool-raft recover-ies. Most horses were recovered from general anes-thesia within the pool-raft system to safeguard repairof a major orthopedic injury. During 471 pool-raftrecoveries, 34 (7%) horses had complications withinthe recovery pool and 62 (13%) had complicationswithin the recovery stall. Deaths resulted from complete failure of internal fixation, pulmonary dysfunc-tion, or a combination of pulmonary dysfunction andfixation failure in 2% (10/471) of horses that under-went pool-raft recoveries.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—The pool-raftsystem is a good option for recovery from generalanesthesia. Although not a fail-safe system, itappears to decrease the complications of recoveringhorses in a high-risk category. Potential disadvan-tages of this system are added expense and man-power necessary in building, maintenance, andusage, as well as size limitations of the raft itself. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2002;221:1014–1018)

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Summary

Of 82 dogs with thyroid carcinoma seen between January 1981 and October 1989, 20 had freely movable tumors without evidence of metastasis and were treated with surgical excision alone. Uncensored mean and median survival times for these 20 dogs were both 20.5 months. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis, which censors for nontumor-related deaths and dogs lost to follow-up, indicated that median survival time was greater than 36 months. Seven dogs died of tumor-related causes: 2 died because of metastasis or local recurrence of the tumor, 5 died of treatment-related complications (eg, laryngeal paralysis, hypocalcemia, tracheostomy complications). Eight dogs died of unrelated causes; 1 dog was lost to follow-up at 26 months after surgery; 3 dogs were alive 19, 24, and 26 months after surgery. Cause of death could not be determined in the remaining dog. Long-term survival is possible following surgical removal of mobile thyroid carcinomas in dogs.

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Summary:

Eighty-seven cats with histologically confirmed malignant tumors were used in a prospective study to determine the toxicity of mitoxantrone, a dihydroxyquinone derivative of anthracene, which was administered at 21-day intervals at dosages ranging from 2.5 to 6.5 mg/m2 of body surface, iv. Eleven of these cats were treated concurrently with radiation but were evaluated separately. Each cat was evaluated for signs of toxicosis for 3 weeks after each dose was administered or until the cat developed progressive disease, or until the cat's quality of life diminished to an unacceptable level as determined by the owner or attending veterinarian. Although the primary purpose of this study was to determine a clinically useful dosage and to characterize the toxicoses associated with mitoxantrone administration, each cat was monitored for response to treatment. Forty-nine cats had been refractory to 1 or more treatment modalities prior to inclusion in this study.

The most common signs of toxicosis after treatment with mitoxantrone were vomiting, anorexia, diarrhea, lethargy, sepsis secondary to myelosuppression, and seizures. Two cats died of complications that may have been attributed to mitoxantrone: 1 of cardiomyopathy and the other of pulmonary edema of an undetermined cause. Older cats were more likely to develop signs of toxicosis after the third or fourth mitoxantrone treatment than younger cats (P ≤ 0.05). Cats with signs of toxicosis during the 21-day interval after administration of the first dose of mitoxantrone were significantly (P ≤ 0.05) more likely to develop signs of toxicosis during the 21-day interval between the second and third doses of mitoxantrone. Similarly, cats that became toxic during the 21-day interval between the second and third doses were significantly (P ≤ 0.05) more likely to become toxic during the 21-day interval between the third and fourth doses. Controlling for age, breed, and dose of mitoxantrone, cats that became toxic after the first treatment were 2.4 times more likely to have poor performance status than the non toxic cats. Tumor-bearing cats had some degree of myelosuppression 7 days after they were given mitoxantrone at 6.5 mg/m2, iv (median neutrophil count, 2,440 cells/μl; range, 1,595 to 6,300 cells/μl).

Complete or partial remission (> 50% reduction volume reduction) was obtained in 18.4% (14/76) of cats given mitoxantrone alone. Remission was recorded in 17.6% (9/51) of cats with carcinoma, 11.8% (2/17) of the cats with lymphoma, and 37.5% (3/8) of the cats with sarcoma.

Because the cats with squamous cell carcinoma had a poor response to mitoxantrone, an additional 11 cats with squamous cell carcinoma were treated concurrently with radiation (44 to 65 Gy, 10 to 15 fractions) over a 3-week period beginning at the time the first dose of mitoxantrone (2.5 to 6 mg/m2) was given. None of these 11 cats had any signs of toxicosis attributable to mitoxantrone chemotherapy. Eight cats had a complete remission (median, 170 days; range, 28 to 485 days), and 1 had a partial remission that lasted 60 days.

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association