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  • Author or Editor: M. Julia B. F. Flaminio x
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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective

To determine cytologic changes in horses with recurrent airway obstruction (heaves) after administration of aerosolized beclomethasone dipropionate and dexamethasone parenterally.

Animals

6 horses with inducible and reversible heaves.

Procedure

Episodes of heaves were induced by exposure to moldy hay and straw for 7 days. Horses were assigned to treatment groups (aerosolized beclomethasone, parenterally administered dexamethasone, aerosolized propellant), and pulmonary inflammation was evaluated by serial cytologic examination of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid samples obtained on days 0, 7, 10, 14, and 21. Total and differential cell counting and phenotypic analysis of lymphocyte subpopulations in BAL fluid were performed.

Results

7 days of natural challenge induced neutrophilic inflammation. Neutrophil counts in BAL fluid were reduced in beclomethasone- and dexamethasone-treated horses on days 10 and 14 but rebounded to pretreatment values on day 21. The proportion of proinflammatory lymphocyte subpopulations (CD4+ and B+) and MHC class-II antigen expression were increased on days 14 and 21 in propellant-treated horses, compared with beclomethasone- and dexamethasone-treated horses.

Conclusions

Aerosolized beclomethasone attenuated neutrophilic pulmonary inflammation and prevented alteration in lymphocyte subpopulations in horses with heaves. Results were similar to the response associated with parenterally administered dexamethasone. Short-term administration of aerosolized beclomethasone without minimizing environmental allergen exposure is not expected to provide prolonged anti-inflammatory benefit for horses with heaves. (Am J Vet Res 1998;59:1033–1038)

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective

To determine alteration in adrenocortical function in horses with recurrent airway obstruction (heaves) after aerosol and parenteral administration of beclomethasone dipropionate and dexamethasone, respectively.

Animals

6 horses with inducible and reversible heaves.

Procedure

Episodes of heaves were induced by exposure to moldy hay and straw for 7 days (natural challenge). Horses then underwent treatment (aerosolized beclomethasone, parenterally administered dexamethasone, and aerosolized propellant) for 7 days. Horses remained in the mold-contaminated environment for 7 days after discontinuation of drugs. Adrenocortical function was determined by serial evaluation of Cortisol concentration in serum obtained on days 0, 7, 9, 12, 14, 16, 19, and 21. Adrenocorticotropic hormone stimulation testing was performed in 4 horses/treatment group on days 0, 7, 14, and 21.

Results

Endogenous Cortisol production was suppressed in beclomethasone- and dexamethasone-treated horses within 2 days of treatment but recovered to values similar to those in propellant-treated horses approximately 2 and 4 days after discontinuation of drugs. Serum Cortisol concentration in propellant-treated horses gradually decreased during the study and was significantly lower than baseline on days 14, 16, 19, and 21. Mean increase in serum Cortisol concentration in response to ACTH stimulation testing after beclomethasone and dexamethasone administration did not differ significantly from the response observed in propellant-treated horses.

Conclusions

Aerosol and parenteral administration of beclomethasone and dexamethasone, respectively, suppressed adrenocortical function; however, endogenous cortisol production resumed approximately 2 and 4 days after discontinuation of drugs. Responsiveness to ACTH stimulation testing was not affected by the 7-day treatment period. (Am J Vet Res 1998;59:1044–1047)

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective

To determine changes in clinical signs of disease and response to pulmonary function testing in horses with recurrent airway obstruction (heaves) after aerosol and parenteral administration of beclomethasone dipropionate and dexamethasone, respectively.

Animals

6 horses with inducible and reversible heaves.

Procedure

Episodes of heaves were induced by exposure (challenge) to moldy hay and straw for 7 days. Horses were assigned to treatment groups (aerosolized beclomethasone dipropionate, parenterally administered dexamethasone, aerosolized propellant [control]), and respiratory frequency and subjective assessment of respiratory effort were determined twice daily. Maximal change in pleural pressure (ΔPplmax), pulmonary resistance (RL), and dynamic compliance (Cdyn) was determined on days 0, 7, 10, 14, and 21.

Results

The RL and ΔPplmax were increased, and Cdyn was decreased in all horses in response to natural challenge. Beclomethasone reduced RL on day 10, reduced ΔPplmax on days 14 and 21 and increased Cdyn on day 14. Dexamethasone reduced RL and ΔPplmax on days 10, 14, and 21 and increased Cdyn on days 10 and 14. Respiratory effort (subjective assessment) improved after 2 and 3 days of beclomethasone and dexamethasone administration but rebounded to pretreatment values 1 and 3 days after discontinuation of drugs.

Conclusions

Pulmonary function testing responses and clinical signs of airway obstruction were improved by administration of beclomethasone. The magnitude of response to aerosolized beclomethasone generally was less marked than the response to parenterally administered dexamethasone. Higher or more frequent dosing of aerosolized beclomethasone may be necessary to achieve the anti-inflammatory response to parenterally administered dexamethasone. (Am J Vet Res 1998;59:1039–1043)

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research