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  • Author or Editor: M. Joy Weinstein x
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Summary

Thirty-five dogs with appendicular osteosarcoma were treated with 5 doses of doxorubicin (30 mg/m2 of body surface, IV, every 2 weeks). Surgical excision of the primary tumor was performed 13 days after the second (n = 18) or third (n = 17) treatment, and the subsequent doxorubicin treatment was given the day following surgery. Resected tumors were evaluated histologically to determine response to preoperative chemotherapy (ie, percentage of the tumor that was necrotic). Survival data for the 35 dogs were compared with survival data for a historical control group, consisting of 162 dogs with appendicular osteosarcoma treated by amputation alone.

Administration of doxorubicin at 2 week intervals was well tolerated. Three dogs were alive and did not have evidence of disease at the time of reporting. Of the remaining 32 dogs, 3 died or were euthanatized because of cardiomyopathy presumably caused by doxorubicin; 1 died suddenly 116 weeks after initiation of treatment; and the remaining 28 were euthanatized because of problems documented to be related to distant metastases. Thirteen dogs (40.6%) were euthanatized because of pulmonary metastases, 10 dogs (31.3%) were euthanatized because of bone metastases, and 5 dogs (15.6%) were euthanatized because of metastases in other sites. The proportion of dogs euthanatized because of bone metastases was significantly (P < 0.001) higher for the study group than for the control group.

Median survival time for the 35 dogs that received doxorubicin was estimated to be 52.3 weeks, and 1- and 2-year survival rates were estimated to be 50.5 and 9.7%, respectively. Survival time was significantly (P < 0.0001) longer for these dogs than for control dogs. Percentage of the resected primary tumor that was necrotic ranged from 0 to 87% (mean, 24.9%). There was a significant (r = 0.39; P < 0.05) direct correlation between survival time and percentage of the tumor that was necrotic.

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Summary

Twenty-two dogs with appendicular osteosarcoma were treated by amputation (n = 17) or limb-sparing surgery (n = 5). All dogs were given cisplatin (60 mg/m2 of body surface, iv) at 3-week inervals, beginning 1 week after surgery. Number of cisplatin treatments ranged from 1 to 6. Survival data for the 22 dogs were compared with survival data from a historical control group consisting of 162 dogs with appendicular osteosarcoma treated by amputation alone.

Median survival time for the 22 dogs given cisplatin was estimated to be 46.4 weeks, and 1- and 2-year survival rates were estimated to be 45.5 and 20.9%, respectively. Survival time was significantly (P < 0.0001) longer for treated dogs than for control dogs. Statistically significant relation was not found between survival time and number of cisplatin treatments.

Three dogs were alive with no evidence of disease at the time of reporting. Of the remaining 19 dogs, 14 (73.4%) were euthanatized for problems documented to be related to metastases. Nine (47.4%) dogs were euthanatized because of bone metastases, and 5 (26.3%) were euthanatized because of pulmonary metastases. The proportion of dogs euthanatized because of bone metastases was significantly (P < 0.0001) higher for treated than for control dogs. Median survival times for dogs developing bone and lung metastases were estimated to be 51.2 weeks and 21.2 weeks, respectively; however, this difference was not statistically significant.

One local tumor recurrence was observed among dogs that had limb-sparing surgery. Significant difference in survival time was not observed between dogs that had limb-sparing surgery and dogs that underwent amputation.

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

SUMMARY

A rapid, simple chemosensitivity assay, assessing tumor cell nuclear uptake of doxorubicin hydrochloride, was evaluated in 16 dogs with appendicular osteosarcoma. Doxorubicin was administered to dogs in 5 biweekly treatments, and surgical resection was performed after the second or third treatment. The chemosensitivity assay was performed on biopsy specimens from all dogs before chemotherapy. It was repeated on tissue from resected tumors, and tumors were evaluated histologically to determine the degree of necrosis resulting from chemotherapy. Disease-free and total survival time correlated significantly (P < 0.05 in both cases) with the degree of postchemotherapy necrosis of the primary tumors. Significant correlation was not apparent between the percentage of tumor cells with nuclear uptake of doxorubicin (in either biopsy or resection samples) and disease-free or total survival time. The percentage of cells with nuclear uptake of doxorubicin in surgically resected tumors correlated significantly (P < 0.05) with percentage of necrosis.

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research