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  • Author or Editor: M. Christine Zink x
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Abstract

OBJECTIVE To determine rate of and factors associated with return to agility competition for dogs with cranial cruciate ligament (CrCL) rupture treated with tibial plateau leveling osteotomy (TPLO).

DESIGN Retrospective case series with nested case-control study.

ANIMALS 31 dogs involved in agility competition with CrCL tears treated by TPLO at a private veterinary clinic from 2007 through 2013.

PROCEDURES Medical records were reviewed to collect information on dog signalment, lesion characteristics, and surgical data. Owners completed a survey regarding whether and when their dog returned to agility competition after TPLO and, if so, how the dog performed. Performance data before and after TPLO were compared.

RESULTS 20 of 31 (65%) dogs returned to agility competition after TPLO, 16 (80%) of which returned within 9 months after TPLO. The mean convalescent period for returning dogs was 7.5 months (range, 3 to 12 months). No dog that returned to competition sustained an injury to the affected limb during the follow-up period. No significant difference was identified between dogs that returned or did not return to agility competition regarding severity of osteoarthritis or proportions with meniscal injury or partial (vs complete) CrCL tears.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE These data suggested that the prognosis for returning to agility competition was good for dogs undergoing TPLO. None of the evaluated lesion characteristics were associated with return to competition. Rate of return to competition and duration of the convalescent period may be useful outcome variables for future investigations involving orthopedic procedures in dogs.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To investigate associations between age at gonadectomy and estimated risk or age at diagnosis of neoplastic and behavioral disorders in Vizslas.

Design—Retrospective cohort study.

Animals—2,505 Vizslas born between 1992 and 2008.

Procedures—Data on demographics, gonadectomy status, and age at diagnosis of disease or disorder were obtained with an anonymous online survey and analyzed.

Results—Dogs gonadectomized at ≤ 6 months, between 7 and 12 months, or at > 12 months of age had significantly increased odds of developing mast cell cancer, lymphoma, all other cancers, all cancers combined, and fear of storms, compared with the odds for sexually intact dogs. Females gonadectomized at ≤ 12 months of age and males and females gonadectomized at > 12 months of age had significantly increased odds of developing hemangiosarcoma, compared with the odds for sexually intact dogs. Dogs gonadectomized at ≤ 6 months of age had significantly increased odds of developing a behavioral disorder. The younger the age at gonadectomy, the earlier the mean age at diagnosis of mast cell cancer, cancers other than mast cell, hemangiosarcoma, lymphoma, all cancers combined, a behavioral disorder, or fear of storms.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Additional studies are needed on the biological effects of removing gonadal hormones and on methods to render dogs infertile that do not involve gonadectomy. Veterinarians should discuss the benefits and possible adverse effects of gonadectomy with clients, giving consideration to the breed of dog, the owner's circumstances, and the anticipated use of the dog.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association