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Objective

To determine the prevalence of Mycoplasma spp in herds that were members of a milk cooperative.

Design

Epidemiologic study.

Sample Population

267 dairy herds that were members of a milk cooperative.

Procedure

Bulk-tank milk samples were collected monthly during a 6-year period from all dairies in the cooperative. Samples were submitted to the cooperative's laboratory for bacterial culture for Mycoplasma spp, using direct plating. Milk samples positive for Mycoplasma organisms were speciated.

Results

Prevalence of positive samples varied from 1.8 to 5.8% for all species of Mycoplasma and from 1.2 to 3.1% for Mycoplasma spp known to be mastitis pathogens. One mycoplasmal species was isolated initially on 99 of 198 (50.0%) dairies, but 68 of 198 (34.3%) dairies had 2 species isolated. Mycoplasma bovis, M californicum, and M bovigenitalium were consistently isolated, but M bovis (243/499; 48.6%) was the most commonly isolated species. Acholeplasma laidlawii was more prevalent in 1989 and 1995 than other years. Mycoplasma bovigenitalium and M californicum had a seasonal distribution. Less than 50 colonies per plate were isolated for most (317/500; 63.4%) bulk-tank samples. Of the milk samples with > 100 colonies/plate, Mycoplasma bovis was isolated most frequently (73/243; 30.0%).

Clinical Implications

Distribution of Mycoplasma spp varied by year, number of colonies isolated per sample, season, and herd. Therefore, it may be necessary to routinely sample bulk-tank milk, and all isolates should be speciated. Culture results from milk cooperatives should be used with other monitoring information to determine the Mycoplasma status of herds. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 1997;211:1036–1038)

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the performance of a next-generation sequencing-based liquid biopsy test for cancer monitoring in dogs.

SAMPLES

Pre- and postoperative blood samples were collected from dogs with confirmed cancer diagnoses originally enrolled in the CANcer Detection in Dogs (CANDiD) study. A subset of dogs also had longitudinal blood samples collected for recurrence monitoring.

METHODS

All cancer-diagnosed patients had a preoperative blood sample in which a cancer signal was detected and had at least 1 postoperative sample collected. Clinical data were used to assign a clinical disease status for each follow-up visit.

RESULTS

Following excisional surgery, in the absence of clinical residual disease at the postoperative visit, patients with Cancer Signal Detected results at that visit were 1.94 times as likely (95% CI, 1.21 to 3.12; P = .013) to have clinical recurrence within 6 months compared to patients with Cancer Signal Not Detected results. In the subset of patients with longitudinal liquid biopsy samples that had clinical recurrence documented during the study period, 82% (9/11; 95% CI, 48% to 97%) had Cancer Signal Detected in blood prior to or concomitant with clinical recurrence; in the 6 patients where molecular recurrence was detected prior to clinical recurrence, the median lead time was 168 days (range, 47 to 238).

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Next-generation sequencing-based liquid biopsy is a noninvasive tool that may offer utility as an adjunct to current standard-of-care clinical assessment for cancer monitoring; further studies are needed to confirm diagnostic accuracy in a larger population.

Open access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To validate the performance of a novel, integrated test for canine cancer screening that combines cell-free DNA quantification with next-generation sequencing (NGS) analysis.

SAMPLE

Retrospective data from a total of 1,947 cancer-diagnosed and presumably cancer-free dogs were used to validate test performance for the detection of 7 predefined cancer types (lymphoma, hemangiosarcoma, osteosarcoma, leukemia, histiocytic sarcoma, primary lung tumors, and urothelial carcinoma), using independent training and testing sets.

METHODS

Cell-free DNA quantification data from all samples were analyzed using a proprietary machine learning algorithm to determine a Cancer Probability Index (High, Moderate, or Low). High and Low Probability of Cancer were final result classifications. Moderate cases were additionally analyzed by NGS to arrive at a final classification of High Probability of Cancer (Cancer Signal Detected) or Low Probability of Cancer (Cancer Signal Not Detected).

RESULTS

Of the 595 dogs in the testing set, 89% (n = 530) received a High or Low Probability result based on the machine learning algorithm; 11% (65) were Moderate Probability, and NGS results were used to assign a final classification. Overall, 87 of 122 dogs with the 7 predefined cancer types were classified as High Probability and 467 of 473 presumably cancer-free dogs were classified as Low Probability, corresponding to a sensitivity of 71.3% for the predefined cancer types at a specificity of 98.7%.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

This integrated test offers a novel option to screen for cancer types that may be difficult to detect by physical examination at a dog’s wellness visit.

Open access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association