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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Summary:

Medical records of 11 adult horses with jejunal intussusception examined at 5 veterinary teaching hospitals between 1981 and 1991 were reviewed. Nine of 11 horses had signs of acute abdominal discomfort for <24 hours, whereas 2 horses had a history of chronic signs. Five of 11 horses had an intraluminal or intramural mass associated with the jejunal intussusception.

Two horses died or were euthanatized prior to surgery. Partial jejunal resection and jejunojejunal anastomosis were performed in 9 horses. One horse died during surgery and 2 were euthanatized prior to hospital discharge because of postoperative complications. Four of the 6 horses that were discharged from the hospital survived from 16 months to 6 years and returned to their previous level of performance. One horse died 3 months after surgery from unknown causes, and 1 horse was lost to long-term follow-up evaluation.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Summary

The medical records of 20 horses admitted to the veterinary medical center with a diagnosis of brachygnathia over a 10-year period (1979 to 1989) were reviewed. The study included 18 foals and 2 adult horses. Males were affected 5.7 times more frequently than females. The amount of disparity between the mandible and premaxilla varied between 0.75 and 3 cm. Sixteen foals were treated surgically with the temporary application of premaxillary tension band devices. Thirteen of the 16 surgical cases were available for follow-up evaluation. All of the surgically treated animals had improved incisive occlusion, and 6 foals had complete resolution of the deformity with corrections ranging from 0.75 to 2.5 cm. Complete correction of the malocclusion was more likely to occur if foals were treated when they were ≤ 6 months old. The average amount of correction achieved in foals treated when they were ≤ 6 months old was 1.5 cm. (range, 0.75 to 2.5 cm). Foals treated, when they were 7 to 12 months old, had an average of 0.6 cm of reduction in the malocclusion (range, 0.25 to 1 cm). Implant failure was the most common complication and occurred in 9 of the 13 foals treated surgically.

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association