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Abstract

Objective—To determine reference values, intertest correlations, and test-retest repeatability of Schirmer tear test 1 (STT-1), phenol red thread test (PRTT), tear film breakup time (TFBUT), tear osmolarity, and meibometry in healthy cats.

Design—Evaluation study.

Animals—135 healthy domestic cats aged 0.5 to 12.8 years.

Procedures—Each test was performed once in 120 cats and repeated in 40. Pearson correlation was used to assess correlation among tests. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) and 95% limits of agreement (LOA) were used to evaluate test-retest repeatability.

Results—Median (95% central range) values were 18 mm/min (9 to 34 mm/min) for STT-1, 29 mm/15 s (15 to 37 mm/15 s) for PRTT, 12.4 seconds (9.1 to 17.7 seconds) for TFBUT, 322 mOsm/L (297 to 364 mOsm/L) for osmolarity, and 32 meibometry units (MU; 11 to 114 MU) for peak meibometry value. The STT-1 and PRTT values were positively correlated. Age was weakly associated with TFBUT and osmolarity. Meibometry measurements were higher for strips that contacted the tear film (285 MU) than for those that touched the eyelid margin only (32 MU). All ICCs were < 0.75, and 95% LOA were wide.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Tear deficiency should be suspected in cats with STT-1 < 9 mm/min, PRTT < 15 mm/15 s, or TFBUT < 9 to 10 seconds. Generally poor correlation among tests suggested that thorough tear film analysis requires performance of multiple tests in concert. Relatively poor test-retest repeatability should be considered when repeated tests are used to monitor tear film dysfunction and response to treatment.

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To compare the efficacy of 0.05% difluprednate ophthalmic emulsion and 1% prednisolone acetate ophthalmic suspension for controlling aqueocentesis-induced breakdown of the blood-aqueous barrier in healthy dogs.

ANIMALS

34 healthy dogs.

PROCEDURES

Dogs were allocated to 5 groups (6 to 8 dogs/group) to receive 0.05% difluprednate, 1% prednisolone acetate, or saline (0.9% NaCl) solution (control treatment) in both eyes 2 or 4 times daily. Eye drops were administered topically for 5 consecutive days. Anterior chamber paracentesis (aqueocentesis) was performed in 1 eye on the third day. Automated fluorophotometry was performed immediately before and 20 minutes and 24 and 48 hours after aqueocentesis. Relative fluorescence (RF), defined as fluorescence of the eye that had undergone aqueocentesis divided by fluorescence of the contralateral eye, was calculated to help control for variation among dogs.

RESULTS

Mean RF was significantly lower at 24 hours after aqueocentesis in dogs treated twice daily with 0.05% difluprednate or 4 times daily with 1% prednisolone acetate than in dogs receiving the control treatment. At 48 hours after aqueocentesis, mean RF was significantly lower in dogs treated 4 times daily with 1% prednisolone acetate than in control dogs. Mean RF differed over time in dogs treated 4 times daily with 0.05% difluprednate but did not differ over time for any of the other treatments.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

All 4 treatments were effective for reducing aqueocentesis-induced anterior uveitis in healthy dogs regardless of the drug or frequency of administration. Topical ophthalmic administration of 0.05% difluprednate may be a viable treatment option for dogs with anterior uveitis and warrants further study.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To assess inhibitory effects of orally administered anti-inflammatory medications on paracentesis-induced intraocular inflammation in clinically normal cats.

Animals—30 clinically normal domestic shorthair cats.

Procedures—Cats were randomly assigned to a control group and 4 treatment groups. Cats in the treatment groups received an anti-inflammatory medication orally once daily at 7 am (acetylsalicylic acid [40.5 mg/cat], meloxicam [0.1 mg/kg], prednisone [5 mg/cat], or prednisolone [5 mg/cat]) for 5 days beginning 2 days before paracentesis-induced breakdown of the blood-aqueous barrier (BAB) and continuing until 2 days after paracentesis. Paracentesis of the anterior chamber was performed in 1 randomly selected eye of each cat. Fluorophotometry was performed in both eyes of each cat immediately before (time 0) and 6, 24, and 48 hours after paracentesis.

Results—At 24 and 48 hours after paracentesis, fluorescein concentration in the eye subjected to paracentesis in the cats receiving prednisolone was decreased, compared with that in the control cats. At 48 hours, a decrease in the fluorescein concentration was also apparent in the eye subjected to paracentesis in the cats receiving meloxicam, compared with that in the control cats. There was no evidence of treatment effects for acetylsalicylic acid or prednisone. There was no evidence of treatment effects in eyes not subjected to paracentesis.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Orally administered prednisolone and meloxicam significantly decreased intraocular inflammation in clinically normal cats with paracentesis-induced BAB breakdown. Oral administration of prednisolone or meloxicam may be an effective treatment for cats with uveitis.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVES To determine, following oral administration of famciclovir, pharmacokinetic (PK) parameters for 2 of its metabolites (penciclovir and BRL42359) in plasma and tears of healthy cats so that famciclovir dosage recommendations for the treatment of herpetic disease can be optimized.

ANIMALS 7 male domestic shorthair cats.

PROCEDURES In a crossover study, each of 3 doses of famciclovir (30, 40, or 90 mg/kg) was administered every 8 or 12 hours for 3 days. Six cats were randomly assigned to each dosage regimen. Plasma and tear samples were obtained at predetermined times after famciclovir administration. Pharmacokinetic parameters were determined for BRL42359 and penciclovir by compartmental and noncompartmental methods. Pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK-PD) indices were determined for penciclovir and compared among all dosage regimens.

RESULTS Compared with penciclovir concentrations, BRL42359 concentrations were 5- to 11-fold greater in plasma and 4- to 7-fold greater in tears. Pharmacokinetic parameters and PK-PD indices for the 90 mg/kg regimens were superior to those for the 30 and 40 mg/kg regimens, regardless of dosing frequency. Penciclovir concentrations in tears ranged from 18% to 25% of those in plasma. Administration of 30 or 40 mg/kg every 8 hours achieved penciclovir concentrations likely to be therapeutic in plasma but not in tears. Penciclovir concentrations likely to be therapeutic in tears were achieved only with the two 90 mg/kg regimens.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE In cats, famciclovir absorption is variable and its metabolism saturable. Conversion of BRL42359 to penciclovir is rate limiting. The recommended dosage of famciclovir is 90 mg/kg every 12 hours for cats infected with feline herpesvirus.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

CASE DESCRIPTION

A 9-month-old miniature Hereford heifer was evaluated for a mass on the right inferior eyelid that had progressed in size over 3 months.

CLINICAL FINDINGS

Physical examination revealed a firm, ulcerated, pedunculated mass on the right inferior eyelid that extended from the medial quarter to beyond the lateral canthus of the eye. The base of the mass measured 7.4 × 6.7 cm, and the dorsal margin of the base of the mass was approximately 3 mm ventral to the inferior eyelid margin. Histologic evaluation of incisional biopsy specimens from the mass was consistent with fibrosarcoma.

TREATMENT AND OUTCOME

The mass was surgically resected with care taken to preserve the eyelid margin. The resulting 10 × 8.5-cm surgical wound was treated with adjunct CO2 laser therapy and closed by primary closure at its medial and central aspects and placement of a 4.6 × 2.6-cm lyophilized equine amnion multilayer graft and 2 sheets of 4-ply porcine small intestinal submucosa at its lateral aspect. The grafts were kept moist by alternating topical antimicrobial and artificial tear ointments for 3 weeks. The wound healed without complications, resulting in a functional and aesthetically pleasing outcome despite the development of moderate ectropion at the lateral aspect of the inferior eyelid.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Results suggested that a combination of extracellular matrix scaffolds may be an alternative to extensive skin flaps for management of large dermal wounds, particularly wounds resulting from blepharoplasty where preservation of an eyelid margin is desired.

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To assess reliability of the Schirmer tear test-1 (STT-1) for measurement of tear production in cats in various environments, investigate whether sympathetic stimulation impacts measurements, and determine whether meaningful conclusions regarding lacrimation in cats can be drawn from STT-1 measurements obtained with STT strip placement for < 1 minute.

ANIMALS

176 cats examined in a private practice (n = 100), a feral cat clinic (56), or a veterinary teaching hospital (20).

PROCEDURES

The STT-1 was performed in both eyes of each cat. Measurements were recorded at 10− or 30-second intervals for 1 minute. Cats at the teaching hospital were tested once in a quiet examination room (unstimulated conditions) and once in the same room with loud prerecorded noises (stimulated conditions), with a 30-minute interval between tests and evaluation of cats’ heart rates before and after STT-1. Data were analyzed with parametric statistical tools and a nonlinear mixed-effect model.

RESULTS

30− and 60-second STT-1 measurements were significantly correlated (r = 0.94). The STT-1 measurements did not differ under nonstimulated versus stimulated conditions, despite significant changes in heart rates that indicated sympathetic stimulation. A hyperbolic model of STT-1 kinetics was validated, allowing for extrapolation of measurements obtained in < 60 seconds and generation of reference values (95% predictive intervals) for various test durations. Median (95% predictive interval) 30− and 60-second STT-1 measurements were 9.1 mm (4.8 to 15.6 mm) and 14.3 mm (8.2 to 22.3 mm), respectively.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

The STT-1 was a reliable diagnostic test in all settings; results were not affected by sympathetic stimulation, and a shorter duration of testing could be considered in selected cases.

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association