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Authors Amy Webb and Linden Craig

Abstract

In collaboration with the American College of Veterinary Pathologists

Open access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
History

A 37-year-old 2.0-kg (4.4-lb) sexually intact female African penguin (Spheniscus demersus) was found dead following a 2-day period of isolation from its exhibit mates as a consequence of recent conspecific-induced trauma that resulted in abrasions around its beak and forehead. The penguin had a history of degenerative joint disease, respiratory tract issues, and wounds inflicted by other penguins, but had not had any health issues during the preceding 2 to 3 years. The penguin had no other obvious problems and none of its exhibit mates had signs of illness.

Gross Necropsy Findings

Necropsy revealed marked pectoral muscle

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
History

A 3-year-old hen with a 1-month history of a mass on the left naris that bled intermittently was euthanized and submitted for necropsy to the University of Tennessee College of Veterinary Medicine.

Clinical and Gross Findings

At necropsy, there was a 15 × 15 × 5-mm, firm, raised, crusted, dark brown-black mass on the skin of the left side of the face between the left naris and the left eye (Figure 1). On cut section, the mass extended into the maxilla and filled the left and right nasal cavities. Multiple black nodules ranging from 1 mm to

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
History

A 30-year-old 468-kg (1,030-lb) American Paint gelding was evaluated at the University of Tennessee Veterinary Medical Center because of signs of colic. The horse had no previous history of colic. The owner reported that the horse had no clinical signs the night before, but was found sweating and shaking in its stall the next morning. There were signs that the horse had been rolling on the ground and had inflicted head trauma. The owner had administered flunixin meglumine a (10 mL, IV), but when the horse's condition failed to improve, it was brought to the hospital.

Clinical and
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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
History

A 4.5-week-old 5.7-kg (12.5-lb) Yorkshire-Berkshire crossbred piglet was submitted for necropsy after it died on a farm. The piglet had a brief history of lethargy, dyspnea, decreased appetite, and loose feces (exact duration of clinical signs not provided). The piglet came from a farm that had 17 other pigs. Two piglets had previously died, and 2 others were sick.

Gross Findings

The piglet was in good nutritional condition, with a body condition score of 3/5. The liver was orange and flaccid with mottled red and black areas (Figure 1). The liver weighed 101.5 g (1.79% of body

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
History

Four approximately 6-week-old bobwhite quail (Colinus virginianus) were submitted for necropsy. The quail were from a production flock of approximately 30,000 in which there had been 15 deaths over 2 weeks. The quail were confined to an open barn, where the flock colony grazed and was fed a game bird maintenance feed. The quail did not have a history of vaccinations, and there was no known exposure to any toxins.

Gross Findings

All 4 quail had similar gross findings that consisted of tan to yellow, pinpoint to 4-mm-diameter, raised rough plaques on the mucosa of the small

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
History

A 10-year-old 67.5-kg (148.5-lb; body condition score, 4/9) castrated male Mastiff was evaluated by a primary care veterinarian because of perianal ulcers and generalized muscle wasting with subsequent weight loss of several months' duration. A presumptive diagnosis of perianal fistulas was made, and prednisone, a topical antibacterial and antifungal ointment, a and cephalexin were prescribed. The lesion in the perianal skin was reported to improve with medical treatment, but the dog became hyporexic at this time. Because of continued hyporexia and weight loss, the prednisone was changed to cyclosporine capsules. b After no improvement in hyporexia or

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
History

An 11-year-old 4.5-kg (9.9-lb) neutered male domestic shorthair cat was referred to the ophthalmology department at VCA Veterinary Care Animal Hospital and Referral Center because of superior eyelid entropion and a corneal ulcer in the left eye of several weeks' duration.

Clinical and Gross Findings

Ophthalmic examination findings included positive pupillary light reflexes, positive menace responses, and normal intraocular pressures in both eyes. The remainder of the examination findings for the right eye were unremarkable. In the left eye, the superior eyelid had severe entropion with trichiasis. The eyelids were restricted such that the palpebral reflex was absent and

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
History

A 7-year-old 5.31-kg (11.68-lb) castrated male American Shorthair was admitted to the College of Veterinary Medicine at the University of Tennessee for evaluation of vomiting, lethargy, and anorexia of 3 days' duration. The cat was allowed indoor and outdoor access, and its vaccination status was current. The cat regularly received heartworm and flea preventatives. Previous history included urinary tract infections, but none had developed in the preceding 4 years.

Clinical and Gross Findings

The cat had a body condition score of 7 (scale of 9), and the remainder of the physical examination findings were considered normal. A CBC revealed

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
History

A captive 13-year-old castrated male African lion (Panthera leo) housed at a large cat sanctuary for the previous 5 years was found dead within its enclosure, and the carcass was submitted to the University of Tennessee Veterinary Medical Center for autopsy. This animal seemed to be healthy in the days preceding its death and had no notable medical history.

Gross Findings

At autopsy, the lion weighed 208.5 kg (458.7 lb) and was obese (body condition score, 5/5) with abundant subcutaneous and visceral adipose tissue. The pericardial sac contained 350 mL of thin, clear, pale yellow fluid. Affecting

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association