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  • Author or Editor: Linda A. Ross x
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Abstract

Objective—To examine changes between 1996 and 2004 in regard to numbers of animals handled, medical care provided, expenses, numbers of employees, and agency policies for animal care and control agencies in Ohio.

Design—Cross-sectional survey.

Sample Population—223 animal care and control agencies.

Procedures—A questionnaire was mailed to animal care and control agencies in Ohio to collect information for 2004; results were compared with published results of a similar survey.

Results—165 of the 223 (74%) agencies responded. Estimated total number of animals handled in 2004 was 315,519, which represented a decrease of 7% compared with 1996. However, although number of dogs taken in decreased 17%, number of cats taken in increased 20%. Between 1996 and 2004, the euthanasia rate decreased from 65.3% to 56.8%, and the adoption rate increased from 24.5% to 33.6%. Number of dogs euthanatized decreased 39%, but number of cats euthanatized increased 14%. The proportion of agencies with a spay-neuter policy increased from 56% to 71%, and the proportion that maintained an association with a veterinarian increased from 39% to 80%. For dogs handled by county dog warden agencies, the odds of euthanasia were higher if the agency did not have a spay-neuter policy (odds ratio, 1.36).

Conclusions—Results suggest that the status of dogs handled by animal care and control agencies in Ohio improved between 1996 and 2004, but that the status of cats deteriorated.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate use of gadolinium diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA) to estimate glomerular filtration rate (GFR) by plasma clearance and use of an ELISA as the method of Gd-DTPA quantification.

Animals—16 dogs of various sexes and breeds (12 dogs were clinically normal, and 4 dogs were polyuric and polydipsic with no other clinical or biochemical abnormalities).

Procedures—GFR was estimated by measuring the plasma clearance of Gd-DTPA and iohexol by use of an ELISA and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), respectively. The GFR was determined by use of a 1-compartment model for both methods. The GFRs obtained by Gd-DTPA plasma clearance were compared with those obtained by iohexol plasma clearance by use of correlation analysis, paired t tests, and limits of agreement analysis. A paired t test was used to evaluate differences between the 2 plasma clearance methods.

Results—A strong linear correlation (r 2 = 0.90) was found between GFRs derived from the plasma clearance of Gd-DTPA and those derived from the plasma clearance of iohexol. By use of limits of agreement analysis, almost all (13/14) dogs had Gd-DTPA GFRs that were within 12% of iohexol GFRs. The remaining dog had a Gd-DTPA GFR that was 45% higher than the iohexol GFR. There was no significant difference between Gd-DTPA GFRs and those obtained with iohexol.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—This study revealed that plasma clearance of Gd-DTPA measured by use of an ELISA is an effective method to estimate GFR in dogs because it compared favorably with results for the iohexol-HPLC method.

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To develop a method for determining the concentration of the third component of complement (C3) in canine serum, to establish a reference range for C3 in healthy dogs, and to evaluate dogs with protein-losing nephropathy (PLN) to determine whether PLN is associated with decreased serum C3 concentrations.

Animals—30 healthy dogs and 49 dogs with PLN.

Procedures—Serum samples were obtained from healthy dogs at the time of examination, whereas serum samples were obtained from dogs with PLN at the time of diagnosis. All samples were frozen at −70°C until analyzed. Serum C3 concentrations were determined by use of a sandwich ELISA. Concentrations were expressed as the number of dilutions in which C3 could be detected.

Results—C3 was detectable in healthy control dogs (range, 1,920,000 to 15,400,000 dilutions; median, 9,600,000 dilutions). This represented a range of four 2-fold serum dilutions. In addition, C3 was detectable in dogs with PLN (range, 1,460,000 to 30,070,000 dilutions; median, 7,680,000 dilutions), which represented a range of six 2-fold serum dilutions. There was no significant difference in C3 concentrations between the 2 groups.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—C3 is a critical part of the immune defense system that has not been extensively examined in veterinary medicine. An ELISA was developed for measuring C3 concentrations, and a reference range for healthy dogs was established. Significant decreases in C3 concentrations were not detected in any dog with PLN. Additional studies will be required to definitively determine the importance of serum C3 concentrations in PLN.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association